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Injury Thread

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
This practice session began with a drill requiring forceful acute push off from a standstill to beat a medicine ball that was thrown into the air before it hit the ground. No warm ups were performed. I've written repeatedly that the old approach of stretching exercises prior to other workouts should never be done............and has been abandoned by most every legitimate trainer. The blood needs to be pumped throughout the body to all the muscles before any attempt to perform any exercises that stretch them. In this case the athletes were mostly dormant for the past year, and just now trying to get back into shape. Of all muscles that are affected by dormancy, it is the calf muscles (which are attached to the Achilles tendon )..............they go through greatest shortening with extended dormancy. Therefore, athletes must have a great awareness when it comes to trying to stretch the calf muscles to normal length too quickly........it must be done over days to weeks. The strength and conditioning trainer who oversaw this activity should be shown the door.............to the nearest training school.

On the same day, 2 other CFL players suffered the same fate...........details of those Achilles ruptures are not released yet. But I assure you that dormancy plus quick stretch were the main factors.


CFL players union alarmed after 4 Roughriders suffer torn Achilles tendons in 6 minutes

The Canadian Football League did not play at all last season because of the COVID-19 pandemic, which means the CFL needs to be particularly cautious about players easing themselves back into football shape. The players union says that did not happen at team workouts this week.

Incredibly, four different players on the Saskatchewan Roughriders suffered torn Achilles tendons during a six-minute stretch during one workout on Thursday, and two different players on other teams suffered torn Achilles tendons on the same day. The CFL players union is putting the blame squarely on league and team officials.

THE REST OF THE STORY
 
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Mangler

All Pro
This practice session began with a drill requiring forceful acute push off from a standstill to beat a medicine ball that was thrown into the air before it hit the ground. No warm ups were performed. I've written repeatedly that the old approach of stretching exercises prior to other workouts should never be done............and has been abandoned by most every legitimate trainer. The blood needs to be pumped throughout the body to all the muscles before any attempt to perform any exercises that stretch them. In this case the athletes were mostly dormant for the past year, and just now trying to get back into shape. Of all muscles that are affected by dormancy, it is the calf muscles (which are attached to the Achilles tendon )..............they go through greatest shortening with extended dormancy. Therefore, athletes must have a great awareness when it comes to trying to stretch the calf muscles to normal length too quickly........it must be done over days to weeks. The strength and conditioning trainer who oversaw this activity should be shown the door.............to the nearest training school.

On the same day, 2 other CFL players suffered the same fate...........details of those Achilles ruptures are not released yet. But I assure you that dormancy plus quick stretch were the main factors.


CFL players union alarmed after 4 Roughriders suffer torn Achilles tendons in 6 minutes

The Canadian Football League did not play at all last season because of the COVID-19 pandemic, which means the CFL needs to be particularly cautious about players easing themselves back into football shape. The players union says that did not happen at team workouts this week.

Incredibly, four different players on the Saskatchewan Roughriders suffered torn Achilles tendons during a six-minute stretch during one workout on Thursday, and two different players on other teams suffered torn Achilles tendons on the same day. The CFL players union is putting the blame squarely on league and team officials.

THE REST OF THE STORY
That is just horrible! You’d think professional trainers would know better, but I guess not.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Remember, the NFL Injury Report system was supposedly established for the the purpose of

The policy requires that teams provide credible, accurate and specific information about injured players to the league office, their opponents, local and national media, and the league’s broadcast partners each week during the regular season and postseason.

The reporting process is of paramount importance in maintaining the integrity of the game.
It has always been a facade...........little more than a joke. It's main purpose has always been the "unwritten major source" for the establishment of Vegas gambling odds.

Now that legalized gambling on games has been opened, the system already with sadly compromised integrity will undoubtedly deteriorate giving way to gross corruption.

The return of Elliot Ness becomes a strong eventual probability.

*************************************************************************************

NFL knows it must reconsider accountability for hiding and faking injuries
July 19, 2021, 5:11 PM EDT

The NFL publicly has had nothing to say about the news that quarterback Tom Brady played the entire 2020 season with a torn MCL in his knee without the Buccaneers ever disclosing the injury. Privately, the NFL recognizes the potential problems that can arise from teams violating the injury report.

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, the league realizes that it must reconsider the degree of accountability when it comes to the hiding and/or faking of injuries. Last year, the league had a handful of situations involving failure to report injuries, and at least two situations where the league identified the faking of an injury during games.

The league has approached these matters with less and less transparency, refraining from making it known to the world that its teams lie and cheat when it comes to injuries. Put simply, the league doesn’t want those who may regulate (or prosecute) responsible persons to realize how widespread the problem is. The league nevertheless knows that it must insist on greater compliance in order to prevent future problems with politicians or prosecutors, and that could result (sooner or later) in the league-imposed penalties increasing for violations — along with a more aggressive effort by the league to enforce infractions.

Flipping widespread violations to uniform compliance will require a dramatic shift in the culture of secrecy that prompts teams to keep opponents in the dark when it comes to the true health or lack thereof of its players. The Buccaneers understandably hid Brady’s knee injury to keep defensive players from “testing” the knee. One hit, intentional or accidental (or “accidental”), could have ended the season for Brady and, in turn, for the team.
Thus, it won’t be easy to get teams to embrace the importance of transparency and accuracy regarding injury information. It’s nevertheless critical to do so. Without compliance, inside information exists. Gamblers will try to find it. Persons who have it could be contacted and potentially corrupted for it. Those relationships could grow, and what began as an effort to obtain inside information regarding the health of a given player could expand. Eventually, depending on the role of the person involved, efforts could be undertaken to shave points or rig a prop bet.
THE REST OF THE STORY
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
Remember, the NFL Injury Report system was supposedly established for the the purpose of



It has always been a facade...........little more than a joke. It's main purpose has always been the "unwritten major source" for the establishment of Vegas gambling odds.

Now that legalized gambling on games has been opened, the system already with sadly compromised integrity will undoubtedly deteriorate giving way to gross corruption.

The return of Elliot Ness becomes a strong eventual probability.

*************************************************************************************

NFL knows it must reconsider accountability for hiding and faking injuries
July 19, 2021, 5:11 PM EDT

The NFL publicly has had nothing to say about the news that quarterback Tom Brady played the entire 2020 season with a torn MCL in his knee without the Buccaneers ever disclosing the injury. Privately, the NFL recognizes the potential problems that can arise from teams violating the injury report.

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, the league realizes that it must reconsider the degree of accountability when it comes to the hiding and/or faking of injuries. Last year, the league had a handful of situations involving failure to report injuries, and at least two situations where the league identified the faking of an injury during games.

The league has approached these matters with less and less transparency, refraining from making it known to the world that its teams lie and cheat when it comes to injuries. Put simply, the league doesn’t want those who may regulate (or prosecute) responsible persons to realize how widespread the problem is. The league nevertheless knows that it must insist on greater compliance in order to prevent future problems with politicians or prosecutors, and that could result (sooner or later) in the league-imposed penalties increasing for violations — along with a more aggressive effort by the league to enforce infractions.

Flipping widespread violations to uniform compliance will require a dramatic shift in the culture of secrecy that prompts teams to keep opponents in the dark when it comes to the true health or lack thereof of its players. The Buccaneers understandably hid Brady’s knee injury to keep defensive players from “testing” the knee. One hit, intentional or accidental (or “accidental”), could have ended the season for Brady and, in turn, for the team.
Thus, it won’t be easy to get teams to embrace the importance of transparency and accuracy regarding injury information. It’s nevertheless critical to do so. Without compliance, inside information exists. Gamblers will try to find it. Persons who have it could be contacted and potentially corrupted for it. Those relationships could grow, and what began as an effort to obtain inside information regarding the health of a given player could expand. Eventually, depending on the role of the person involved, efforts could be undertaken to shave points or rig a prop bet.
THE REST OF THE STORY
this is why I don’t feel any kind of way about these new players crying about concussions & pain and how their bodies have fallen apart once they stop playing…everyone knows these dudes hide injuries. At some point you just have to consider your long term Health & in no other sport except maybe MMA do guys just willing disregard sound medical advice like players do in the NFL.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Marcus Canon underwent a "minor" knee cleanout surgery. He has been placed on the PUP active list. He is supposedly to be ready to return in a couple of weeks. But I expect that he may miss most if not all of the preseason.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Tuesday, during his conditioning test, JJ Watt was said to have a sore hamstring, nothing to worry about, he would be back in a couple of days. After Wednesday, he was placed on PUP. Not reported, but he has a grade II tear. This injury could very well follow him for a long time into this season. With his history of core and specifically back issues, would not be surprised to see the hamstring tear to lead to any one of a number of compensatory injury issues.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame

As it turns out this may be something that could affect Prescott longer than anticipated. An MRI revealed that this was not a classic shoulder injury....not a labrum or rotator cuff injury, but a tear of the latissimus dorsi muscle. This tear may seem like a relatively benign injury. However, on the throwing side, this muscle has much to do with power delivery of the football by a QB. I would not consider this injury a "a day to day" injury. These tend to be nagging injuries that can easily be re-injured, especially if not given adequate time to fully rehab. There is a good chance that Prescott's major ankle injury is still not allowing him to gain maximum throw velocity.......leading him to compensate power from his latissimus dorsi..........leading to its tear.

Although this article is about pitchers, most of the basic principles are quite similar.:

Latissimus Tears: The Newest Injury for Throwing Athletes (Part I)
02/22/2019
Just when you thought rehabbing pitchers was hard enough, a new injury has emerged in the throwing population

With Spring Training underway, baseball is officially back! As a fan, I am more than excited. As a medical professional and a PT who spends a lot of time treating the baseball population, I know my schedule is about to ramp up. As Posner, et al (2011) found, April is the month with the highest injury rates for MLB players, with pitchers having a 34% higher injury than position players. One of the injuries we are seeing more often than in years past in our professional pitchers are latissimus injuries. For a lot of reasons, we will discuss below, it seems that latissimus injuries are being diagnosed more frequently than they were in decades past. It was not until 2010 that the first lat repair surgery was performed on a professional baseball player, when Jake Peavy went under the knife. Since then, many of the game’s biggest stars, including Stephen Strasburg, Fernando Rodriguez, Clayton Kershaw, Noah Syndergaard, and Cardinals top prospect Alex Reyes have sustained lat injuries. In a systematic review of 30 professional baseball pitchers, Mehdi, Frangiamore, & Schickendantz (2016) found that the average time required to return to pitching was 99.8 days for the non-operative group and 140 days for the surgically treated group. As you can see, once you sustain a lat injury, the recovery is slow.

THE REST OF THE STORY
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Is that consistent with possibly “playing through it” like it’s being reported Wentz is considering?
Not unless they're removing the sesamoid bone instead of repairing it. This would be unusual without prior conservative treatment. Although this is the NFL and all things are possible. Not necessarily smart. I have a very strong suspicion that he has been dealing with sesamoid problem for quite a while. Looking at some of his film from last year, he would supinate his plant foot on push off, something commonly seen with pain under the great toe area where the sesamoid bones reside..... And something that is commonly seen in compensatory injuries to the back and hip which he had been dealing with.
 
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CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Not unless they're removing the sesamoid bone instead of repairing it. This would be unusual without prior conservative treatment. Although this is the NFL and all things are possible. Not necessarily smart. I have a very strong suspicion that he has been dealing with sesamoid problem for quite a while. Looking at some of his film from last year, he would supinate his plant foot on push off, something commonly seen with pain under the great toe area where the sesamoid bones reside..... And something that is commonly seen in compensatory injuries to the back and hip which he had been dealing with.
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Just to clarify my feelings re. if it is a sesamoid excision that is being considered, my experience has been at least a 3-4 month recovery, and playing through it (with or without surgery) would not be a reasonable consideration. You would essentially need to keep the area numbed up to control the pain during play, which would introduce its own set of potential problems.
 


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