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Texans random thought of the day

Double Barrel

Clown Hunter
Staff member
Contributor's Club
OK, I had not read the article from The Athletic. Here's the title.

Josh McCown may jump from former NFL QB to head coach, but he’s not jumping the line

Um, that's exactly what McCown would be doing. There has been a lot of talk about how a black player would never be considered to go from the field directly to head coach. True. But neither would a white player. Not in the past 60 years, anyway. It's not about race. It's about something else.

I thought originally this was strictly about a certain someone pushing McCown in this direction. But in this quote from McNown, he seems totally behind the idea of becoming a NFL head coach without being one at any level.

Is it going to happen for some guy? McCown seems pretty confident.

Here are some positive quotes on McCown becoming an NFL coach:

No one can make that jump. When your inexperience shows, you lose the team. From players to coaches. That's what happened to Urban Meyer, who had decades of coaching experience. Get a job in the NFL as an assistant and kick a$$. Until then, no more puff pieces about jumping the line.

So you say. As long as Jack is in the building, McCown as the head coach is very real.
The Texans are one of the few organizations capable of doing something so abjectly and spectacularly stupid that I fully expect it to happen.

I hate to see it but I have a gut feeling that this season is becoming another controlled tank…
On the bright side, it might be the one thing this franchise is good at! lol

I think I'll market a Texans t-shirt with their logo and "Embrace The Suck" on it.
 

TexansBull

Hall of Fame
The Texans are one of the few organizations capable of doing something so abjectly and spectacularly stupid that I fully expect it to happen.



On the bright side, it might be the one thing this franchise is good at! lol

I think I'll market a Texans t-shirt with their logo and "Embrace The Suck" on it.
Can a person sell NFL themed merchandise and use images that aren’t copyrighted? I am thinking of towels and shirts…

Does anyone know how that works and not get sued by the NFL or the Houston Texans?
 

steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
The Texans are one of the few organizations capable of doing something so abjectly and spectacularly stupid that I fully expect it to happen.



On the bright side, it might be the one thing this franchise is good at! lol

I think I'll market a Texans t-shirt with their logo and "Embrace The Suck" on it.
Seems to have worked out well for the Stros. Hopefully Cal is much more patient than posters on this MB are.

I think Caserio can be like Luhnow.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
After turning fans off with 2 years of dysfunction, Texans brass intent on wooing them back
Brooks Kubena, Staff writer
Sep. 7, 2022Updated: Sep. 7, 2022 9:15 a.m.


There was so much to be said. At last, there was a place to say it. The original Texans season-ticket holders filed into the NRG Center, nearly 500 of them, and rode the escalator toward a conference room stocked with food, beer and two long sections of chairs bracketed by two microphones on stands.

Two lines began to form. It was a town hall-style meeting. Predetermined questions had been ditched. The two faces of year two of the franchise’s rebuild — general manager Nick Caserio and head coach Lovie Smith — sat at the front of the room, hands pointing to the microphones. Ask anything. Unfiltered. No limits.

It was an emotional 90 minutes, those who attended the June meeting say. Questions that had festered for two miserable seasons finally found a source, the kind of questions that had been aired out only in private conversations, call-in radio shows and comment sections.

Some people just spoke their mind. These were the franchise’s most loyal supporters, the ones who’d kept their season tickets after the controversial DeAndre Hopkins trade; after the city’s long-awaited franchise quarterback, Deshaun Watson, left in a lewd legal battle; after observing front office enigma Jack Easterby roam the sideline too tightly; after watching the one-and-done David Culley coach a 4-13 season while sitting on their couches at home because that was the only leverage against the Texans they had.

There’s a fallacy in an empty stadium. The network cameras didn’t pan away from Kirby Drive last season, flow in an Indiana Jones-style line for a few miles and zoom in on the house of Larry Stafford, a 54-year-old original Texans season-ticket holder who screamed at his television, slammed the front door shut, and took his dog for a walk to try to calm down.

There wasn’t a parabolic microphone directed at Stafford and his football friends of two decades, who’d witnessed the Texans come agonizingly close to their first AFC title game berth in 2019 only to dive into disaster, who’d watched their tailgating group split up, who’d learned season-ticket holders in their section gave up their seats and knew it was too late for them to do the same.

“We just had to make the choice about not showing up,” Stafford says. “Even though I’ve committed to my tickets, it was just money that I was throwing away, because the product on the field and the way that the organization was making the fans feel like we didn’t matter … it was just too much for us to bear.”

Why not give up the tickets now? Why tax emotions any further? Part of it is familial legacy, Stafford says. He wants to give his 16-year-old son something Stafford’s own parents were unable to pass down. Part of it is because he still believes a Houstonian self-identifies with his city and that a city’s identity is intrinsically tied to its pro football team. Part of it is because he’s seeing that Texans leadership is starting to show they believe this too.

So as Stafford joined the others in line at the town hall, he began crafting the question he felt ultimately mattered. He thought about being a kid and watching Earl Campbell’s Monday Night Football run against the Dolphins in 1978, the sort of national attention the Texans recaptured with Watson, Hopkins and J.J. Watt. He thought of Texans season-ticket holders who’ve died in the last 20 years. He thought about how Houstonians are still staring at a decades-old door that former Oilers coach Bum Phillips once famously said they’d kick in.

Complexities formed into a simple question. Stafford approached the microphone.
“When are we going to win the Super Bowl?”

Extreme makeover

Pardon the hammers and electric drills. The construction of the Texans’ new business office isn’t quite done yet. This conference room will have to do, but please mind the plastic covering billowing from the third wall’s incomplete paneling.

There’s Cal McNair and his wife, Hannah, on one side of a conference table. Down the hall is an open and sleek office space, a nearly complete renovation project that temporarily displaced the Texans’ business operations staff to a rented unit in the Galleria district.

Now, Texans employees are back. It’s a modernized work environment. Everyone and everything is within view. Soon, a mannequin football player will stand on one end of the room next to a small billboard that has on it Cal’s personal mantra, a phrase that people who’ve worked with the franchise’s CEO and chairman say defines his gradual but persistent process since taking over the day-to-day operations after his father, Bob McNair, died in November 2018.
“I want to challenge us to be great,” Cal says. “I want us to take that next step and challenge everyone, empower them and give them what they need to go there.”

It’s a foundational philosophy rooted in his family. Cal was one of his father’s first employees at Cogen Technologies, where he helped oversee the construction of the three major power plants that made the fortune that enabled the late McNair to front the $700 million expansion fee in 1999 to bring another NFL franchise to Houston.

Cal officially joined the Texans as the organization’s vice chairman in 2008, and his responsibilities increased as his father’s battle against skin cancer intensified. Bob had built a contender by the time of his death, and Cal adopted his father’s low-key approach to trust his general manager and head coach to make decisions related to the football team.

Bill O’Brien was a winning coach, albeit a power-hungry executive. He jockeyed about personnel decisions even with his close friend Brian Gaine, whose one-year tenure as general manager ended in a surprise firing in June 2019 after his relationship with O’Brien boiled over. The coach’s influence filled the void unofficially in a season that produced a deep playoff run, which followed Houston’s backed-off pursuit of Caserio when the Patriots filed tampering charges against the Texans.

McNair had two realistic options: Empower O’Brien or fire him. The latter would have been bold. The Texans were back-to-back AFC South champions at the time, and even in the wake of Houston’s divisional-round meltdown to the Chiefs, firing O’Brien would have carried risks, particularly considering his relationship as a play-caller with Watson, who had two years remaining on his rookie contract.

So McNair officially named O’Brien general manager. Easterby, hired months before Gaine’s departure, had worked closely with O’Brien on personnel decisions, and the trades and contracts they executed over their two seasons together spiraled the Texans into a disastrous cap space and draft capital situation that could not address the roster’s eventual deficiencies.

McNair fired O’Brien after an 0-4 start in 2020, hired Caserio, whom the Texans unsuccessfully had attempted to lure away from New England twice before, then transferred his trust to a tenured football executive who requested the patience and financial support for a massive overhaul.

That capital was granted. McNair is still paying substantial sums for players Caserio cut loose. The 2022 dead money hits from former linebacker Zach Cunningham ($12.8 million), defensive end Whitney Mercilus ($7 million), cornerback Bradley Roby ($4.6 million) and wide receiver Randall Cobb ($3.5 million) exceed all but 12 of the cap hits associated with players actually on this season’s 53-man roster.

Caserio secured six draft picks, including three first-rounders, by trading Watson to the Browns in March, but the former quarterback’s dead money hit ($16.2 million) won’t clear the books until next offseason. Only then can the Texans become big spenders in free agency.

For now, Houston’s roster again embodies frugality. All nine drafted rookies plus three undrafted free agents make up just under a fourth of the team, which underlines just how swiftly new players can overtake the old.

“The McNair family has been supportive from the beginning of what we’re doing from a football perspective,” Caserio says. “So we have a fiduciary responsibility to try and make the right decisions, try to make smart decisions. And certainly grateful for the opportunity to do that.”

Meanwhile, season-ticket holders kept at bay in 2020 by mandated stadium restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic returned a year later to a dreadful on-field product still associated with Watson, who’d issued a trade demand, then was sued by 24 women who alleged he sexually assaulted them in massage therapy sessions.

The Texans were later added to the lawsuits, which alleged the franchise enabled Watson, and the McNair family settled claims with 30 women in mid-July, calling the action “a clear stand against any form of sexual assault and misconduct.”

Watson’s 11-game suspension marks Cleveland’s Dec. 4 game at NRG Stadium as the quarterback’s debut, a reminder to Houstonians of a situation Stafford says “really almost broke me.” Add that to a 2021 season Stafford called “complete misery,” and he says several season-ticket holders were wondering how much longer their support could last.
 

steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
After turning fans off with 2 years of dysfunction, Texans brass intent on wooing them back
Brooks Kubena, Staff writer
Sep. 7, 2022Updated: Sep. 7, 2022 9:15 a.m.


There was so much to be said. At last, there was a place to say it. The original Texans season-ticket holders filed into the NRG Center, nearly 500 of them, and rode the escalator toward a conference room stocked with food, beer and two long sections of chairs bracketed by two microphones on stands.

Two lines began to form. It was a town hall-style meeting. Predetermined questions had been ditched. The two faces of year two of the franchise’s rebuild — general manager Nick Caserio and head coach Lovie Smith — sat at the front of the room, hands pointing to the microphones. Ask anything. Unfiltered. No limits.

It was an emotional 90 minutes, those who attended the June meeting say. Questions that had festered for two miserable seasons finally found a source, the kind of questions that had been aired out only in private conversations, call-in radio shows and comment sections.

Some people just spoke their mind. These were the franchise’s most loyal supporters, the ones who’d kept their season tickets after the controversial DeAndre Hopkins trade; after the city’s long-awaited franchise quarterback, Deshaun Watson, left in a lewd legal battle; after observing front office enigma Jack Easterby roam the sideline too tightly; after watching the one-and-done David Culley coach a 4-13 season while sitting on their couches at home because that was the only leverage against the Texans they had.

There’s a fallacy in an empty stadium. The network cameras didn’t pan away from Kirby Drive last season, flow in an Indiana Jones-style line for a few miles and zoom in on the house of Larry Stafford, a 54-year-old original Texans season-ticket holder who screamed at his television, slammed the front door shut, and took his dog for a walk to try to calm down.

There wasn’t a parabolic microphone directed at Stafford and his football friends of two decades, who’d witnessed the Texans come agonizingly close to their first AFC title game berth in 2019 only to dive into disaster, who’d watched their tailgating group split up, who’d learned season-ticket holders in their section gave up their seats and knew it was too late for them to do the same.

“We just had to make the choice about not showing up,” Stafford says. “Even though I’ve committed to my tickets, it was just money that I was throwing away, because the product on the field and the way that the organization was making the fans feel like we didn’t matter … it was just too much for us to bear.”

Why not give up the tickets now? Why tax emotions any further? Part of it is familial legacy, Stafford says. He wants to give his 16-year-old son something Stafford’s own parents were unable to pass down. Part of it is because he still believes a Houstonian self-identifies with his city and that a city’s identity is intrinsically tied to its pro football team. Part of it is because he’s seeing that Texans leadership is starting to show they believe this too.

So as Stafford joined the others in line at the town hall, he began crafting the question he felt ultimately mattered. He thought about being a kid and watching Earl Campbell’s Monday Night Football run against the Dolphins in 1978, the sort of national attention the Texans recaptured with Watson, Hopkins and J.J. Watt. He thought of Texans season-ticket holders who’ve died in the last 20 years. He thought about how Houstonians are still staring at a decades-old door that former Oilers coach Bum Phillips once famously said they’d kick in.

Complexities formed into a simple question. Stafford approached the microphone.
“When are we going to win the Super Bowl?”

Extreme makeover

Pardon the hammers and electric drills. The construction of the Texans’ new business office isn’t quite done yet. This conference room will have to do, but please mind the plastic covering billowing from the third wall’s incomplete paneling.

There’s Cal McNair and his wife, Hannah, on one side of a conference table. Down the hall is an open and sleek office space, a nearly complete renovation project that temporarily displaced the Texans’ business operations staff to a rented unit in the Galleria district.

Now, Texans employees are back. It’s a modernized work environment. Everyone and everything is within view. Soon, a mannequin football player will stand on one end of the room next to a small billboard that has on it Cal’s personal mantra, a phrase that people who’ve worked with the franchise’s CEO and chairman say defines his gradual but persistent process since taking over the day-to-day operations after his father, Bob McNair, died in November 2018.
“I want to challenge us to be great,” Cal says. “I want us to take that next step and challenge everyone, empower them and give them what they need to go there.”

It’s a foundational philosophy rooted in his family. Cal was one of his father’s first employees at Cogen Technologies, where he helped oversee the construction of the three major power plants that made the fortune that enabled the late McNair to front the $700 million expansion fee in 1999 to bring another NFL franchise to Houston.

Cal officially joined the Texans as the organization’s vice chairman in 2008, and his responsibilities increased as his father’s battle against skin cancer intensified. Bob had built a contender by the time of his death, and Cal adopted his father’s low-key approach to trust his general manager and head coach to make decisions related to the football team.

Bill O’Brien was a winning coach, albeit a power-hungry executive. He jockeyed about personnel decisions even with his close friend Brian Gaine, whose one-year tenure as general manager ended in a surprise firing in June 2019 after his relationship with O’Brien boiled over. The coach’s influence filled the void unofficially in a season that produced a deep playoff run, which followed Houston’s backed-off pursuit of Caserio when the Patriots filed tampering charges against the Texans.

McNair had two realistic options: Empower O’Brien or fire him. The latter would have been bold. The Texans were back-to-back AFC South champions at the time, and even in the wake of Houston’s divisional-round meltdown to the Chiefs, firing O’Brien would have carried risks, particularly considering his relationship as a play-caller with Watson, who had two years remaining on his rookie contract.

So McNair officially named O’Brien general manager. Easterby, hired months before Gaine’s departure, had worked closely with O’Brien on personnel decisions, and the trades and contracts they executed over their two seasons together spiraled the Texans into a disastrous cap space and draft capital situation that could not address the roster’s eventual deficiencies.

McNair fired O’Brien after an 0-4 start in 2020, hired Caserio, whom the Texans unsuccessfully had attempted to lure away from New England twice before, then transferred his trust to a tenured football executive who requested the patience and financial support for a massive overhaul.

That capital was granted. McNair is still paying substantial sums for players Caserio cut loose. The 2022 dead money hits from former linebacker Zach Cunningham ($12.8 million), defensive end Whitney Mercilus ($7 million), cornerback Bradley Roby ($4.6 million) and wide receiver Randall Cobb ($3.5 million) exceed all but 12 of the cap hits associated with players actually on this season’s 53-man roster.

Caserio secured six draft picks, including three first-rounders, by trading Watson to the Browns in March, but the former quarterback’s dead money hit ($16.2 million) won’t clear the books until next offseason. Only then can the Texans become big spenders in free agency.

For now, Houston’s roster again embodies frugality. All nine drafted rookies plus three undrafted free agents make up just under a fourth of the team, which underlines just how swiftly new players can overtake the old.

“The McNair family has been supportive from the beginning of what we’re doing from a football perspective,” Caserio says. “So we have a fiduciary responsibility to try and make the right decisions, try to make smart decisions. And certainly grateful for the opportunity to do that.”

Meanwhile, season-ticket holders kept at bay in 2020 by mandated stadium restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic returned a year later to a dreadful on-field product still associated with Watson, who’d issued a trade demand, then was sued by 24 women who alleged he sexually assaulted them in massage therapy sessions.

The Texans were later added to the lawsuits, which alleged the franchise enabled Watson, and the McNair family settled claims with 30 women in mid-July, calling the action “a clear stand against any form of sexual assault and misconduct.”

Watson’s 11-game suspension marks Cleveland’s Dec. 4 game at NRG Stadium as the quarterback’s debut, a reminder to Houstonians of a situation Stafford says “really almost broke me.” Add that to a 2021 season Stafford called “complete misery,” and he says several season-ticket holders were wondering how much longer their support could last.
Hopefully Cal can stay patient and let Caserio build the team before Caserio adds his QB. Unlike what Cal's dad did when Carr was the pick for PR reasons over Peppers. That single decision charted the course for the franchise for the next 20 yrs. This decision by Cal will chart the direction for the Texans org for the next 20 yrs.
 

Earl34

All Pro
Can a person sell NFL themed merchandise and use images that aren’t copyrighted? I am thinking of towels and shirts…

Does anyone know how that works and not get sued by the NFL or the Houston Texans?
You should go for it. If you get sued, your defense can be, "the Texans have been selling stuff for decades and many of those years, they barely qualified as an NFL team".
 
Last edited:

Lucky

Trust Me. I Know What I'm Doing.
Staff member
That capital was granted. McNair is still paying substantial sums for players Caserio cut loose. The 2022 dead money hits from former linebacker Zach Cunningham ($12.8 million), defensive end Whitney Mercilus ($7 million), cornerback Bradley Roby ($4.6 million) and wide receiver Randall Cobb ($3.5 million) exceed all but 12 of the cap hits associated with players actually on this season’s 53-man roster.
That's not correct. The Texans don't owe the players listed any money. Dead money is the amount of cap space that can't be used due to allocated bonus cap hits becoming due on players no longer with the team. It doesn't come out of McNair's pocket this year. It's already been spent.

And the Chronic expects my $$$ to read their stuff. Hire decent writers and editors that know something about what they're reporting on. Then, maybe. I don't even know what this article is trying to tell me. Cal McNair is over his head? Wow, who knew?
 

Texansballer74

The Marine
After turning fans off with 2 years of dysfunction, Texans brass intent on wooing them back
Brooks Kubena, Staff writer
Sep. 7, 2022Updated: Sep. 7, 2022 9:15 a.m.


There was so much to be said. At last, there was a place to say it. The original Texans season-ticket holders filed into the NRG Center, nearly 500 of them, and rode the escalator toward a conference room stocked with food, beer and two long sections of chairs bracketed by two microphones on stands.

Two lines began to form. It was a town hall-style meeting. Predetermined questions had been ditched. The two faces of year two of the franchise’s rebuild — general manager Nick Caserio and head coach Lovie Smith — sat at the front of the room, hands pointing to the microphones. Ask anything. Unfiltered. No limits.

It was an emotional 90 minutes, those who attended the June meeting say. Questions that had festered for two miserable seasons finally found a source, the kind of questions that had been aired out only in private conversations, call-in radio shows and comment sections.

Some people just spoke their mind. These were the franchise’s most loyal supporters, the ones who’d kept their season tickets after the controversial DeAndre Hopkins trade; after the city’s long-awaited franchise quarterback, Deshaun Watson, left in a lewd legal battle; after observing front office enigma Jack Easterby roam the sideline too tightly; after watching the one-and-done David Culley coach a 4-13 season while sitting on their couches at home because that was the only leverage against the Texans they had.

There’s a fallacy in an empty stadium. The network cameras didn’t pan away from Kirby Drive last season, flow in an Indiana Jones-style line for a few miles and zoom in on the house of Larry Stafford, a 54-year-old original Texans season-ticket holder who screamed at his television, slammed the front door shut, and took his dog for a walk to try to calm down.

There wasn’t a parabolic microphone directed at Stafford and his football friends of two decades, who’d witnessed the Texans come agonizingly close to their first AFC title game berth in 2019 only to dive into disaster, who’d watched their tailgating group split up, who’d learned season-ticket holders in their section gave up their seats and knew it was too late for them to do the same.

“We just had to make the choice about not showing up,” Stafford says. “Even though I’ve committed to my tickets, it was just money that I was throwing away, because the product on the field and the way that the organization was making the fans feel like we didn’t matter … it was just too much for us to bear.”

Why not give up the tickets now? Why tax emotions any further? Part of it is familial legacy, Stafford says. He wants to give his 16-year-old son something Stafford’s own parents were unable to pass down. Part of it is because he still believes a Houstonian self-identifies with his city and that a city’s identity is intrinsically tied to its pro football team. Part of it is because he’s seeing that Texans leadership is starting to show they believe this too.

So as Stafford joined the others in line at the town hall, he began crafting the question he felt ultimately mattered. He thought about being a kid and watching Earl Campbell’s Monday Night Football run against the Dolphins in 1978, the sort of national attention the Texans recaptured with Watson, Hopkins and J.J. Watt. He thought of Texans season-ticket holders who’ve died in the last 20 years. He thought about how Houstonians are still staring at a decades-old door that former Oilers coach Bum Phillips once famously said they’d kick in.

Complexities formed into a simple question. Stafford approached the microphone.
“When are we going to win the Super Bowl?”

Extreme makeover

Pardon the hammers and electric drills. The construction of the Texans’ new business office isn’t quite done yet. This conference room will have to do, but please mind the plastic covering billowing from the third wall’s incomplete paneling.

There’s Cal McNair and his wife, Hannah, on one side of a conference table. Down the hall is an open and sleek office space, a nearly complete renovation project that temporarily displaced the Texans’ business operations staff to a rented unit in the Galleria district.

Now, Texans employees are back. It’s a modernized work environment. Everyone and everything is within view. Soon, a mannequin football player will stand on one end of the room next to a small billboard that has on it Cal’s personal mantra, a phrase that people who’ve worked with the franchise’s CEO and chairman say defines his gradual but persistent process since taking over the day-to-day operations after his father, Bob McNair, died in November 2018.
“I want to challenge us to be great,” Cal says. “I want us to take that next step and challenge everyone, empower them and give them what they need to go there.”

It’s a foundational philosophy rooted in his family. Cal was one of his father’s first employees at Cogen Technologies, where he helped oversee the construction of the three major power plants that made the fortune that enabled the late McNair to front the $700 million expansion fee in 1999 to bring another NFL franchise to Houston.

Cal officially joined the Texans as the organization’s vice chairman in 2008, and his responsibilities increased as his father’s battle against skin cancer intensified. Bob had built a contender by the time of his death, and Cal adopted his father’s low-key approach to trust his general manager and head coach to make decisions related to the football team.

Bill O’Brien was a winning coach, albeit a power-hungry executive. He jockeyed about personnel decisions even with his close friend Brian Gaine, whose one-year tenure as general manager ended in a surprise firing in June 2019 after his relationship with O’Brien boiled over. The coach’s influence filled the void unofficially in a season that produced a deep playoff run, which followed Houston’s backed-off pursuit of Caserio when the Patriots filed tampering charges against the Texans.

McNair had two realistic options: Empower O’Brien or fire him. The latter would have been bold. The Texans were back-to-back AFC South champions at the time, and even in the wake of Houston’s divisional-round meltdown to the Chiefs, firing O’Brien would have carried risks, particularly considering his relationship as a play-caller with Watson, who had two years remaining on his rookie contract.

So McNair officially named O’Brien general manager. Easterby, hired months before Gaine’s departure, had worked closely with O’Brien on personnel decisions, and the trades and contracts they executed over their two seasons together spiraled the Texans into a disastrous cap space and draft capital situation that could not address the roster’s eventual deficiencies.

McNair fired O’Brien after an 0-4 start in 2020, hired Caserio, whom the Texans unsuccessfully had attempted to lure away from New England twice before, then transferred his trust to a tenured football executive who requested the patience and financial support for a massive overhaul.

That capital was granted. McNair is still paying substantial sums for players Caserio cut loose. The 2022 dead money hits from former linebacker Zach Cunningham ($12.8 million), defensive end Whitney Mercilus ($7 million), cornerback Bradley Roby ($4.6 million) and wide receiver Randall Cobb ($3.5 million) exceed all but 12 of the cap hits associated with players actually on this season’s 53-man roster.

Caserio secured six draft picks, including three first-rounders, by trading Watson to the Browns in March, but the former quarterback’s dead money hit ($16.2 million) won’t clear the books until next offseason. Only then can the Texans become big spenders in free agency.

For now, Houston’s roster again embodies frugality. All nine drafted rookies plus three undrafted free agents make up just under a fourth of the team, which underlines just how swiftly new players can overtake the old.

“The McNair family has been supportive from the beginning of what we’re doing from a football perspective,” Caserio says. “So we have a fiduciary responsibility to try and make the right decisions, try to make smart decisions. And certainly grateful for the opportunity to do that.”

Meanwhile, season-ticket holders kept at bay in 2020 by mandated stadium restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic returned a year later to a dreadful on-field product still associated with Watson, who’d issued a trade demand, then was sued by 24 women who alleged he sexually assaulted them in massage therapy sessions.

The Texans were later added to the lawsuits, which alleged the franchise enabled Watson, and the McNair family settled claims with 30 women in mid-July, calling the action “a clear stand against any form of sexual assault and misconduct.”

Watson’s 11-game suspension marks Cleveland’s Dec. 4 game at NRG Stadium as the quarterback’s debut, a reminder to Houstonians of a situation Stafford says “really almost broke me.” Add that to a 2021 season Stafford called “complete misery,” and he says several season-ticket holders were wondering how much longer their support could last.
It doesn’t seem like it right now especially when they should be 3-0.
 

thunderkyss

Just win baby!!!
Staff member
Contributor's Club
It doesn’t seem like it right now especially when they should be 3-0.
No way this team should be 3-0. That’s a delusion. Like trying to cash in on fool’s gold.

I understand, I saw the same thing you did. Situations this team could not cash in on. 0-4 in 3-1 situations. That’s the reality. Longest drive this season probably under 60 yards. That QB you’re talking about that can’t hit the broad side of a barn.

No doubt, I saw the bad teams we played, playing poorly. But I also saw our team playing worse.
 

Thorn

Dirty Old Man
No way this team should be 3-0. That’s a delusion. Like trying to cash in on fool’s gold.

I understand, I saw the same thing you did. Situations this team could not cash in on. 0-4 in 3-1 situations. That’s the reality. Longest drive this season probably under 60 yards. That QB you’re talking about that can’t hit the broad side of a barn.

No doubt, I saw the bad teams we played, playing poorly. But I also saw our team playing worse.
Texans show good spark, but no ignition.
 

TheRealJoker

Hall of Fame
No way this team should be 3-0. That’s a delusion. Like trying to cash in on fool’s gold.

I understand, I saw the same thing you did. Situations this team could not cash in on. 0-4 in 3-1 situations. That’s the reality. Longest drive this season probably under 60 yards. That QB you’re talking about that can’t hit the broad side of a barn.

No doubt, I saw the bad teams we played, playing poorly. But I also saw our team playing worse.
Best drive this season has been 4 play 41 yards all handoffs to Pierce last week imo.
 

Texansballer74

The Marine
No way this team should be 3-0. That’s a delusion. Like trying to cash in on fool’s gold.

I understand, I saw the same thing you did. Situations this team could not cash in on. 0-4 in 3-1 situations. That’s the reality. Longest drive this season probably under 60 yards. That QB you’re talking about that can’t hit the broad side of a barn.

No doubt, I saw the bad teams we played, playing poorly. But I also saw our team playing worse.
Not really, they were leading in all three games going into the 4th quarter. They played three solid quarters in all three games. In the 4th they just couldn’t close the deal because of coaching went conservative in the fourth on both sides of the ball. Lovie again went to that weak soft cover two/ prevent defense and Pep went away from what got him the lead. And finally Mills showing he just doesn’t have the clutch gem.
 

thunderkyss

Just win baby!!!
Staff member
Contributor's Club
Not really, they were leading in all three games going into the 4th quarter. They played three solid quarters in all three games.
This is the banana in the tail pipe thing. Don't fall for it.

Defense gifts our offense the ball inside the opponents 50. Offense score 3 points more often than not.

There was a time or two when we did a little trickeration & got down field, but for the most part our offense is broke. Remember the complaints you have for our QB. You're not making those things up.

I don't know where the "we get a lead & then go conservative." thing is coming from. Without the defense or ST, we're barely getting into scoring position.

What I'm seeing is the other team wakes up in the 3rd qtr & our defense isn't able to spot the offense in the red zone
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Texans on quarterback Davis Mills: ‘He’s still learning on the job’

HOUSTON – Davis Mills was rifling passes and finding a rhythm against the Chicago Bears, connecting on intermediate throws to wide receivers Brandin Cooks and Nico Collins.
It was enough to get the Texans into the red zone in the first quarter a week ago. That’s when things unraveled as Mills forced a throw into traffic intended for Cooks, his favorite downfield target, and the deflected pass was intercepted by Bears safety Eddie Jackson in the end zone.

Within that drive and other key sequences at Soldier Field, Mills displayed a troubling tendency to commit critical mistakes as he uncorked the first of his two tipped interceptions during a 23-20 road loss. He also showed some subtle signs of improvement and boldness after playing conservatively in the first two games of the season.

Heading into the fourth game of the season Sunday against the Los Angeles Chargers at NRG Stadium, Mills remains a work in progress as a young quarterback still developing and polishing his game.

He has displayed some flashes of potential, but he has also had his share of struggles for the 0-2-1 Texans as he has completed 57.9 percent of his throws, down from 66.8 percent as a rookie, for 662 yards, three touchdowns, and two interceptions for a pedestrian 77.7 quarterback rating.

It’s not as if Mills is the only player having issues. However, it’s the fourth quarter where the Texans have been outscored by a combined margin of 30-0 where he has really unraveled, completing just 13 of 25 passes for 124 yards, no touchdowns, and one interception for a 46.1 passer rating an average of 5.0 yards per attempt while being sacked four times with one lost fumble.

As the Texans evaluate whether Mills, a strong-armed former third-round draft pick from Stanford who had an encouraging rookie season, is their long-term answer at quarterback, he’s not consumed with the big picture. He’s focused on the next pass, the next practice, the next game. Thoughts of whether he’s doing enough to convince general manager Nick Caserio to not pursue a quarterback in free agency or a first-round draft pick on Ohio State quarterback C.J. Stroud or Alabama standout Bryce Young isn’t how Mills spends his time.

“There are pressures in being the starting quarterback,” Mills said. “I’m not looking that far ahead of it. I’m taking this really one practice at a time, one week at a time right now. I’m just going out there, putting my best foot forward each day for my teammates and trying to win games.”

Mills is 2-13-1 overall since his arrival in Houston, completing 64.87 percent of his career throws for 19 touchdowns and 12 interceptions for an 86.5 passer rating.
He’s a much different player altogether in home games than he is on the road.

In eight career games at NRG Stadium, Mills has completed 68.63 percent of his throws for 1,965 yards, 14 touchdowns, and one interception for a 108.0 passer rating.
On the road, in eight games, Mills has completed just 60.98 percent of his throws for 1,361 yards, five touchdowns, and 11 interceptions for a 64.1 passer rating.

“Not too much into that,” Texans coach Lovie Smith said when asked about the difference in Mills’ performances home and away. “For us, he’s played one home game and we as a team didn’t get the job done. There are some good things he did during that.

“I think it’s a small body of work to start writing things in ink right now. I’m anxious to see his second game at home and feed off of the energy from his home crowd. He made improvements this past week and I expect him to take another jump this week.”

The Texans decided not to draft a quarterback on the heels of Mills’ impressive finish to last season. He had a passer rating of 102.4 with 1,258 passing yards, nine touchdowns, and two interceptions in the final five games of his rookie year.

Mills wasn’t aware of the differential between home and road games.

“The biggest thing is that you’re you comfortable at home, you’ve played here before,” Mills said. “Don’t have to deal with the crowd noise on offense and that’s a big thing on the away games, just being able to communicate pre-snap and handle everything.

“You’re not surprised as much. I don’t think really the philosophy changes, obviously, we still have to protect the football. I didn’t know that stat was so lopsided, home and away, interception rate. My job stays the same, just got to execute at a high level regardless.”

That included engineering a victory over the Chargers as he completed a career-high 77.78 percent of his passes for 254 yards, two touchdowns, and zero interceptions for a season-best 130.6 passer rating. He completed 21 of 27 passes.

“They certainly had opportunities to go in a different direction with that position,” Chargers coach Brandon Staley said in a Zoom video call. “That they have really invested in their quarterback shows they have confidence in him. I think he’s definitely earning it. I think he’s an improving player in the league.

“I think he has good stature physically, he’s got poise. When I think of his game, he plays with a really good pace. He can see the game post-snap, which is something you must be able to do to be a good quarterback in this league. I think he’s accurate with the football. I think he can process the snap. He has a strong enough arm to access different parts of the field. I think he’s a guy who has command at the line of scrimmage. I think he’s an improving player and I think that’s evident on the field.”
THE REST OF THE STORY
 

IDEXAN

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Herbert is so good and Eklor is also a very talented back plus their receivers are good it just seemed that the Texans defense was very overmatched today, just not enough talent to compete with the better teams and I dunno but I think the Chargers are the best team we've played to date.
 

Carr Bombed

Hall of Fame
Herbert is so good and Eklor is also a very talented back plus their receivers are good it just seemed that the Texans defense was very overmatched today, just not enough talent to compete with the better teams and I dunno but I think the Chargers are the best team we've played to date.
It's talent and scheme.. both suck. Might as well throw play calling in there as well, trifecta of suck.
 

OptimisticTexan

2022 Rebuilding Block 2 / Go Texans
Herbert is so good and Eklor is also a very talented back plus their receivers are good it just seemed that the Texans defense was very overmatched today, just not enough talent to compete with the better teams and I dunno but I think the Chargers are the best team we've played to date.
I think this falls on Lovie.....his defense seemed "consistently" out of position.
 

vtech9

All Pro
I said it in the game day thread, and I said it last season. Davis Mills is a much better QB when we go up tempo. For the short time we went up tempo against the Chargers, Mills looked great. Pep slowed it down again after that, and Mills went back to meh. If Pep can't see that, he should be replaced right now.
 

Texansballer74

The Marine
I said it in the game day thread, and I said it last season. Davis Mills is a much better QB when we go up tempo. For the short time we went up tempo against the Chargers, Mills looked great. Pep slowed it down again after that, and Mills went back to meh. If Pep can't see that, he should be replaced right now.
Can’t go uptempo all game and almost every quarterback looks good when they do employ that tactic. Brock and O’Brien got into it because OB wouldn’t go uptempo all game.
 

vtech9

All Pro
Can’t go uptempo all game and almost every quarterback looks good when they do employ that tactic. Brock and O’Brien got into it because OB wouldn’t go uptempo all game.
There are many advantages to going up-tempo. It gives the Defense less time to react and adjust to the formation. It keeps the Defense off balance, which opens up both the running game and passing game. It lets the QB react faster, instead of thinking about what the defense is doing.

The longer it takes to snap the ball, the more the defense can jump around and confuse the QB. The longer it takes to snap the ball, the longer those big OLinemen have to stay down in their stances, which makes it more likely to have a false start.

You can always slow it down later to run clock, but like ole Herm Edwards said, you play to win the game. I hate going conservative. We've all seen our teams be successful until they decided to try and slow things down. Oiler's vs Bills ring a bell? Texans vs Chiefs? Yeah, I'd rather keep doing what is working than slowing it down, losing momentum, and ultimately the game.

AND STOP PUTTING BURKHEAD IN ON SHORT YARDAGE PLAYS. The 4th and 1 play with the rollout sack by Mack...everyone knew that was going to be a pass. Pierce should have been in for that play. At least there would have been a threat to run, which should have opened up the FB for the 1st. Burkhead should have at least chipped Mack. However, that was just a poorly designed play from the start, and was doomed to fail.

I need the fire Pep soap.
 

Texansballer74

The Marine
There are many advantages to going up-tempo. It gives the Defense less time to react and adjust to the formation. It keeps the Defense off balance, which opens up both the running game and passing game. It lets the QB react faster, instead of thinking about what the defense is doing.

The longer it takes to snap the ball, the more the defense can jump around and confuse the QB. The longer it takes to snap the ball, the longer those big OLinemen have to stay down in their stances, which makes it more likely to have a false start.

You can always slow it down later to run clock, but like ole Herm Edwards said, you play to win the game. I hate going conservative. We've all seen our teams be successful until they decided to try and slow things down. Oiler's vs Bills ring a bell? Texans vs Chiefs? Yeah, I'd rather keep doing what is working than slowing it down, losing momentum, and ultimately the game.

AND STOP PUTTING BURKHEAD IN ON SHORT YARDAGE PLAYS. The 4th and 1 play with the rollout sack by Mack...everyone knew that was going to be a pass. Pierce should have been in for that play. At least there would have been a threat to run, which should have opened up the FB for the 1st. Burkhead should have at least chipped Mack. However, that was just a poorly designed play from the start, and was doomed to fail.

I need the fire Pep soap.
Chip Kelly tried to employ that tactic the entire game. He wore his offensive players out and it flamed out when it matter the most. Chip was eventually fired.
I fully understand the reason behind going uptempo. But no team is doing that at a high percentage of the game.

Agreed on Burkhead, no way he should be in on every third down play.
 
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steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
Chip Kelly tried to employ that tactic the entire game. He wore his offensive players out and it flamed out when it matter the most. Chip was eventually fired.
I fully understand the reason behind going uptempo. But no team is doing that at high percentage of the game.

Agreed on Burkhead, no way he should be in on every third down play.
Agreed but you can't do worse than the Texans offense is doing now. Up tempo doesn't mean hurry up offense.

Didn't Kelly's team make the playoffs once in his I believe 3 yr tenure I'm Philly.
 

Double Barrel

Clown Hunter
Staff member
Contributor's Club
Seems to have worked out well for the Stros. Hopefully Cal is much more patient than posters on this MB are.

I think Caserio can be like Luhnow.
Jim Crane >>>> McNair family.

And comparing a sport with a minor league system to a sport without one is comparing oranges to tires. Yeah, both are round objects, but both are completely different beyond that comparison.

Unless you're suggesting that Caserio cold ultimately get fired for a cheating scandal. . . :thinking:
 
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vtech9

All Pro
Chip Kelly tried to employ that tactic the entire game. He wore his offensive players out and it flamed out when it matter the most. Chip was eventually fired.
I fully understand the reason behind going uptempo. But no team is doing that at high percentage of the game.

Agreed on Burkhead, no way he should be in on every third down play.
Chip Kelly was fired because he didn't get along with management.
 


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