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Prospects you like

zshawn10

All Pro
Brugler: Pre-Combine NFL Draft Rankings: SEC cornerbacks lead the way in a deep class




1. Greedy Williams, LSU (6-1, 189, 4.47) Shreveport, La. (Calvary Baptist), RS Sophomore, 12/3/1997 (age 21.41)
Strengths: Tall, long athlete … balanced lower body to stay on the same plane vertically … excellent long speed, backpedal and transition skills to stay on top of routes … above average judgment and ball skills downfield (28 passes defended and eight interceptions in 25 starts) … keeps an eye in the backfield with quick click-and-close skills … natural reading in and out breaking routes … rarely bites on double-moves or ball fakes … physical in press and uses the sideline well … always mixing it up and takes pride in frustrating receivers … active hands to create route leverage … displays the confidence and mental toughness required for the position … only missed one game the last two seasons, choosing to sit out the 2018 Fiesta Bowl.
Weaknesses: Skinny frame with wiry muscle tone … lack of play strength shows vs. physical receivers and in the run game … not an eager tackler and often resorts to throwing his shoulder … will bounce off ball carriers mid-tackle … too easily occupied by blockers and doesn’t power through bodies in the screen game … hands-on in coverage and still learning what he can and can’t get away with downfield … has some lazy tendencies with his spacing and receivers can lull him to sleep … late at times turning to find the football … will leave some production on the field … lack of body armor leads to durability concerns.
Summary: A two-year starter at LSU, Williams played both left and right cornerback in Dave Aranda’s 3-4 base scheme, primarily playing press-man and off-man coverages with some zone concepts worked in (also played on punt coverages). He is rarely out of position on tape with the length and sink-and-flow athleticism to mirror receivers’ movements. Williams is highly competitive and tough, but his struggles shedding blocks or consistently finishing in the run game showed on each of his game tapes. Overall, Williams lacks ideal bulk and play strength, but his athleticism, length and play personality allow him to blanket receivers in man coverage, projecting as a starting NFL cornerback with Pro Bowl upside.

2. Byron Murphy, Washington (5-10, 185, 4.48) Scottsdale, Ariz. (Saguaro), RS Sophomore, 1/18/1998 (age 21.28)
Strengths: Excellent space athlete … flips his hips without gearing down, staying balanced mid-transition … shows the foot speed to match receivers vertically or jump routes with closing burst … above-average read/react processor and situational awareness … understands route concepts, peeling off his man to make plays … elite ball skills with 27 passes defended and seven interceptions in 20 collegiate games … averaged 13.6 yards per interception return with one score (7/95/1) … times his hits to separate man from ball … physical in run support and quick to trigger downhill … outstanding mental and physical toughness (also a gunner on punt coverage).
Weaknesses: Slender frame and undersized by NFL standards … not a long-armed player … doesn’t play sudden with only average recovery speed … not a bully in coverage and needs to better disrupt routes … resorts to grabbing vs. speedy receivers and will attract holding penalties … only 20 career games played … missed seven games as a redshirt freshman after fracturing the fifth metatarsal in his foot during practice (September 2017), requiring surgery and a three-inch screw.
Summary: A two-year starter at Washington, Murphy played left cornerback for the Huskies, using mostly bail coverage in man. With a loaded cornerback depth chart when he arrived, he redshirted behind Sidney Jones and Kevin King in 2016 before quickly earning the top spot on the depth chart (and the coveted No. 1 jersey), starting all 20 games he played the last two years. Murphy keeps the weight on the balls of his feet, not his heels, to keep his lower body loose, staying balanced mid-transition to pattern match. Although he doesn’t have the most extensive college resume in terms of experience, his instincts and recognition skills are advanced for his age. Overall, Murphy doesn’t offer elite size, length or speed for the NFL level, but his mental processing, transition technique, ball skills and competitive toughness are all above average, projecting as a scheme-versatile NFL starter.

3. Deandre Baker, Georgia (5-11, 186, 4.53) Miami, Fla. (Northwestern), Senior, 9/4/1996 (age 22.65)
Strengths: Coordinated movement skills at the snap and downfield … stays a step ahead due to his above average instincts and route recognition … sits on patterns and stays dialed in to click-and-close or carry receivers vertically … aggressively uses the sideline and gets physical in coverage … uses his length to work around receivers and fight through their hands … coaches will love what he brings in run support, arriving with thump and competing with terrific finish … doesn’t allow himself to be bullied by blockers … quiet and introverted by nature, but plays confident and grew as a leader in college (former Georgia defensive coordinator Mel Tucker: "He works really hard in practice, he’s developed in the meeting room, he’s emerged as a leader for us.")
Weaknesses: Only average long speed for the position, lacking secondary jets to easily recover … desire to bait can lead to spacing issues … will attract attention from officials for his grabbing downfield … has a few personal foul penalties on his tape for late hits … tackling technique comes and goes, occasionally using his shoulder or attempting to hug and throw … prematurely opens his hips, giving up inside position too easily … lacks much jam experience … doesn’t have extensive experience as an inside cornerback.
Summary: A three-year starter at Georgia, Baker lined up at right cornerback and put together a strong senior season, becoming the first UGA player to win the Jim Thorpe Award as the nation’s top defensive back. He is attempting to be the first Georgia cornerback drafted in the first round since 1999 (Champ Bailey). Baker’s tape shows the quickness, fluidity and instincts to play in both zone and man coverage, along with the toughness to make plays in run support. His hands-on approach is one of his best qualities, but you must live with the other side of the sword as his aggressive nature will lead to penalties or mistakes. Overall, Baker isn’t an elite size/speed prospect, but he shows the innate ability to diagnose routes and put himself in position to make plays, projecting as an NFL starter, ideally suited in off-man or Cover-2 zone schemes.

4. Joejuan Williams, Vanderbilt (6-2, 211, 4.55) Nashville, Tenn. (Hendersonville), Junior, 12/6/1997 (age 21.40)
Strengths: Giant-sized for the position with outstanding height and length … quick-footed and flexible … smoothly opens his gait to stay attached to receivers in his transition … stays busy as a run defender, understanding field leverage and flashing a closing burst to drive and finish … hard-nosed, hug tackler … uses his physicality to pin receivers, post up and clobber at the catch point … uses his length to crowd targets, leading the SEC in passes defended (18) in 2018 … started every game the last two seasons.
Weaknesses: Only average speed and will lose foot races on vertical routes … messy mechanics and savvy route runners force his hips the wrong way … impatient in press, giving up inside position with hard outside sets … driven off the top of routes due to his sidesaddle technique, opening up stop/comeback patterns … plays nose to nose in press, but shows inconsistent jam skills and doesn’t use enough contact to disrupt the infancy of routes … inconsistent ball awareness with his back turned to the football … too many "almost" tackles on his resume.
Summary: A two-year starter at Vanderbilt, Williams was the Commodores boundary cornerback the last two seasons, playing primarily press and off-man coverage. Few cornerbacks tower over wideouts like Williams, who has imposing size and length for the position, with the athleticism to pattern-match. His natural talent and aggressive mentality immediately pop on tape, but so does his lack of technical skills and spatial awareness, leaving him unbalanced downfield and out of position – the 2018 Georgia tape specifically shows the reasons to be both excited and concerned about his talent. Overall, Williams is underdeveloped mechanically and mentally, but he is a large-framed, scheme-specific cornerback with the length/athleticism combination that will be enticing to press-man teams who covet his skill set.

5. Rock Ya-Sin, Temple (6-0, 189, 4.53) Decatur, Ga. (Southwest Dekalb), Senior, 5/23/1996 (age 22.94)
Strengths: Rocked-up, muscular frame … coordinated body control to quickly find his balance when changing directions … quiet, agile feet to stay square and on top of routes … patient in press with the speed to turn and match strides vertically … above average eye discipline and quick to read route combinations … excellent body positioning downfield, getting his head turned and finding the football … excellent ball skills, locating and using his length to disrupt the catch point … strong off-hand … active in the run game with a closing burst downhill … excellent work and preparation habits, which comes from his wrestling background … productive starting experience.
Weaknesses: Only average long-speed for the position … short-stepper … physical nature downfield will draw flags … inconsistent jam technique and timing in press-man … needs to better finish interceptions when the opportunity is there … eager tackler and drops his pads, but wrap-up technique is inconsistent, allowing runners out of his grasp … only one season of experience at the FBS level and didn’t put on his first football helmet until his junior year in high school in 2013.
Summary: A one-year starter at Temple, Ya-Sin lined up in press-man and zone in the Owls’ scheme, also playing on special teams coverages. The FCS transfer joined the Owls in January 2018 and quickly earned the respect of his teammates and coaches, becoming the first player in Temple history to earn a single-digit jersey in his first year with the program (former Temple head coach Geoff Collins: "He has a chip on his shoulder and wants to prove he belongs…he is the embodiment of what Temple tough is"). Ya-Sin is one of the best corner prospects in this draft class with his back to the line of scrimmage, finding the football and playing through the hands of the receiver. Out of players targeted 50 times or more in 2018, he was the only defensive back in the country to not allow a reception of 20-plus yards, leading the team with 14 passes defended. Overall, Ya-Sin is a late bloomer and doesn’t have elite long-speed for the position, but he stays dialed in with his eyes in the right place and outstanding competitive toughness, projecting best in a zone-heavy scheme.

6. Trayvon Mullen, Clemson (6-1, 192, 4.49) Fort Lauderdale, Fla. (Coconut Creek), Junior, 9/20/1997 (age 21.61)
Strengths: Tall and long … easy-striding speed and stays attached to receivers vertically … flexible hips/joints to maintain shadow position and play overtop routes … track-and-drive style player, collecting his momentum to close … understands how to use his length downfield to shield the catch point … quick to forget and has a short memory … lowers his pads to ground ball carriers in run defense.
Weaknesses: Unbalanced pedal and translation, even on linear routes … undeveloped route recognition and field awareness, especially with his back to the ball … plays flat-footed in off-coverage, causing him to be late reacting to underneath patterns … drive angles require sharpening … experienced playing nose to nose at the line of scrimmage, but rarely used his length to jam … below-average ball production (only five passes defended in 15 games in 2018) … missed one game as a sophomore due to a concussion (September 2017).
Summary: A two-year starter at Clemson, Mullen lined up at right cornerback in Brett Venables’ scheme, playing press, off-man and zone coverages. It would be hard to get excited about him by box score scouting, but there wasn’t a ton of action to his side of the field on tape, which certainly contributed to his unimpressive ball production. Mullen is a tall, leggy corner and moves with the fluidity to stay attached with any type of receiver. He is still a novice fundamentally, both with his transition and diagnose skills, and needs to develop a better feel for route breaks. Overall, Mullen has an elite combination of athleticism and length, but he is more of an athlete than technically refined cover man and must improve his understanding of play indicators to take the next step in his development, projecting as a high-ceiling developmental corner.
 
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zshawn10

All Pro
^continued

7. Julian Love, Notre Dame (5-10, 191, 4.48) Westchester, Ill. (Nazareth), Junior, 3/19/1998 (age 21.12)
Strengths: Outstanding agility … coordinated pedal to smoothly transition and stay on the same plane vertically … quick to diagnose routes and sort out what he sees … unlocks his hips to drive on throws … instinctively tracks the ball downfield … trustworthy to compete when the ball is in the air … outstanding ball production with 44 passes defended in 34 career starts … accurately reads the eyes/movements of receivers to make plays with his back to the ball … doesn’t lack for toughness as a run defender … offensive background shows with the ball in his hands, averaging 31.8 yards per interception return (5/159/2) … his extensive film study and detailed preparation are clear on game day.
Weaknesses: Questionable long-speed for the position, struggling to close the gap once receivers gain a step … lacks burst in his movements, struggling to easily recover after a misstep … undersized by NFL standards and his lack of inches are obvious vs. bigger receivers (see 2018 Stanford tape) … inexperienced jamming or disrupting routes … too easily moved by blockers and removed from the run game … too many shoe-string tackle attempts on his film … missed most of the Cotton Bowl after failing the concussion protocol (December 2018).
Summary: A three-year starter at Notre Dame, Love played primarily in the boundary in the Irish’s man-heavy scheme, moving inside in nickel situations. He was among the FBS leaders in passes defended each of the last two seasons, breaking the school record with 44 career passes defended. Although his recovery athleticism is a concern, Love plays with balanced footwork to mirror routes, gain positioning and make plays with his elite-level ball skills. He trusts his eyes and instincts and won’t panic, but his lack of length is evident vs. large-framed targets. Overall, Love’s lack of ideal size, speed and suddenness will be tougher to mask vs. NFL receivers, but his velvet feet, intelligence and ball skills are the type of traits worth betting on, projecting best in the nickel.

8. Justin Layne, Michigan State (6-2, 188, 4.52) Cleveland, Ohio (Benedictine), Junior, 1/12/1998 (age 21.30)
Strengths: Tall, long frame … accelerates to his top speed to stay on top of routes or quickly recover … maintains his balance out of his transition to mirror different types of receivers … natural timing and ball skills and reacts to the ball like a former wide receiver … fearless jumping routes … better feel for getting his head turned to track the football … improved instincts as a junior with a better understanding of route concepts … extends well in press … competitive tackler and gets his man on the ground … tied for the most passes defended (16) in the Big Ten in 2018.
Weaknesses: Leggy gait … tends to play on his heels, causing him to be a tick late driving on in-breaking or underneath routes … not at the point of his development where he fully trusts his technique … has some man-cover limitations as sudden route runners will be able to create separation … questionable play strength and spends too much time attached to blockers.
Summary: A three-year starter at Michigan State, Layne played primarily in the boundary in press-man and zone coverage for the Spartans. He arrived in East Lansing as a wideout, but made the move to defense early in his true freshman season and played both ways at different points in his MSU career, catching one pass for 11 yards. Layne took a sizable step with his key-and-diagnose skills this past season, aiding his innate ability to judge and disrupt the catch point. He has the calm feet and athletic movements to shadow routes, but inconsistent footwork forces him to surrender separation at the break point. Overall, Layne needs continued reps at corner to improve his technique and spacing, but he can mirror and match from press coverage and has outstanding ball skills, projecting as an eventual NFL starter.

9. Saivion Smith, Alabama (6-0, 201, 4.47) St. Petersburg, Fla. (IMG Academy), Junior, 11/5/1997 (age 21.48)
Strengths: Above-average height for the position … light-footed athlete with smooth redirection skills … quickness to mirror and stay on top of routes when he stays disciplined … uses field leverage to his advantage in coverage … plays the ball well once he locates – led Alabama with three interceptions in 2018 (two came against Missouri’s Drew Lock) … playmaker with the ball in his hands, averaging 23.7 yards per interception return with one score (3/71/1) … looks to stab in press … quick to key the run and rally to the football … competes with an edge and uses a sharp punch to keep blockers off him … stays loose in space to break down and chop down ball carriers.
Weaknesses: Good-enough speed for the position, but doesn’t have secondary wheels to recover once beat (see first play on 2018 Ole Miss tape) … undisciplined footwork and technique at the snap, often playing from behind … slight hitch in his transition, creating balance issues … underdeveloped pattern recognition … quick to open his hips in retreat … tends to grab jersey when he hits the brakes instead of gearing down … late to get his head turned to find the football … attended six schools over the last six years, which will be interpreted differently by each club.
Summary: A one-year starter at Alabama, Smith started the first three games of 2018 before he was benched (in favor of true freshman Patrick Surtain) after giving up a 75-yard touchdown to D.K. Metcalf on the first play of the Ole Miss game. However, he returned to the starting lineup when Trevon Diggs was injured and saw snaps at both left and right cornerback, playing mostly press-man. It is no surprise to learn that Smith played a lot of quarterback growing up because he is more of an athlete right now than technically sound cornerback. His lack of transition burst will lead to spacing issues, but he is a physical player who is equipped to jam and likes mixing it up with receivers. Overall, Smith has the size, quickness and competitive mentality required to play the position in the NFL, but he isn’t a burst player and his technical breakdowns will lead to chunk plays for the offense.

10. Jamel Dean, Auburn (6-1, 212, 4.38) Cocoa, Fla. (Cocoa), RS Junior, 10/15/1996 (age 22.54)
Strengths: Impressively built for the position with outstanding length … accelerates well and finds his top speed quickly … maintains his speed vertically and won’t lose any foot races … patient feet in press and looks smooth in reverse … stays attached at the top of routes … alertly uses the sideline to pin receivers and crowd passing windows … soft hands to take advantage of passes thrown in his direction … physical hitter in the run game, bringing his hips … graduated with a degree in Liberal Arts (May 2018) … made SEC Academic Honor Roll the past two years … made plays as a gunner on special teams coverages.
Weaknesses: Speedy but doesn’t play explosive … looks to press but is too soft with his punch and receivers can shake him before he connects … owns an impulsive reaction to grab downfield and will attract yellow laundry … doesn’t play as powerful as he looks and too easily removed by blockers … needs to be more aggressive downhill, often waiting for blockers to get to him on screens … needs to play with better "want to" and urgency … durability is a strong concern with three major knee injuries: suffered a torn ACL and meniscus (December 2013) as a junior in high school; tore the same meniscus as a senior in high school in the season finale (November 2014); suffered an injury to the opposite knee (August 2015) and required surgery; missed one game as a junior at Auburn with a shoulder injury (October 2018).
Summary: A two-year starter at Auburn, Dean battled back from injuries to start the last two seasons as the Tigers’ boundary cornerback. He suffered three major knee injuries prior to his first collegiate game, but the only contest he missed the last two seasons was due to a shoulder issue. Although not a sudden player, Dean is balanced in his transition with above-average speed to match the vertical stretch of receivers. He needs to improve his decisiveness from zone coverage and doesn’t play with the desired competitive mean streak for press-man work. Overall, Dean has elite size, length and speed for the position, but the absence of burst causes him to labor vs. savvy route runners and his long-term durability is a concern.
 

IDEXAN

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Where is Brugler getting the 40 times before the combine?
For these lists, I use the 40-yard dash times that teams have on file for the player. For some, it is a time from spring practice and for others, it is only an estimation. It will be interesting to compare the 40-yard times on file to the “official” results at the combine in Indianapolis. Cornerback is a stopwatch position and drastically different times could change the outlook on a few of these prospects.
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Based on estimation, OK so that's petty damn lame.
As we know 40 times mean little for many if not most position groups. For example: # of 225 lb reps are meaningful for lineman (both offensive and defensive, particularly the latter), but 40 times I'd venture to say mean squat for offensive linemen.
But 40 times are big,very, very big and meaningful for corners. For example if a CB estimated to be a 3rd round pick who's recorded a 4.5 40 but improves to sub 4.4 in the combine he may now be elevated to a 2nd round pick.
 

Lucky

Moderator
Staff member
For these lists, I use the 40-yard dash times that teams have on file for the player. For some, it is a time from spring practice and for others, it is only an estimation. It will be interesting to compare the 40-yard times on file to the “official” results at the combine in Indianapolis. Cornerback is a stopwatch position and drastically different times could change the outlook on a few of these prospects.
&&&&
Based on estimation, OK so that's petty damn lame.
As we know 40 times mean little for many if not most position groups. For example: # of 225 lb reps are meaningful for lineman (both offensive and defensive, particularly the latter), but 40 times I'd venture to say mean squat for offensive linemen.
But 40 times are big,very, very big and meaningful for corners. For example if a CB estimated to be a 3rd round pick who's recorded a 4.5 40 but improves to sub 4.4 in the combine he may now be elevated to a 2nd round pick.
Guess I should have read the article. The teams may have timed these guys during the spring or something. I think some college coaches let scouts come in to see practice, just can't talk to the underclassmen. Could be legit numbers. Just don't know which is real and which is a guess.

I hear you and agree pretty much on some of the testing. But, even a 40 time on an o-lineman can help a bit in scouting. Is the guy a complete athletic slug? Does he have a lingering injury? Does he just not like to stay in shape? It's a piece of the puzzle.
 

IDEXAN

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Guess I should have read the article. The teams may have timed these guys during the spring or something. I think some college coaches let scouts come in to see practice, just can't talk to the underclassmen. Could be legit numbers. Just don't know which is real and which is a guess.
Too often IMO the reliabilty of hand-timed 40s at the prospects school/training facilities are questionable because of conflicts of interest vs the Indy Combine and then manual hand-timed sprints are obviously of slower reactions (resulting in quicker times) than electronic equipment is.
In all of the years that I've been a fan of the Combine & Pro-days I've rarely, hardly ever heard of a prospect having a better time at the combine vs his Pro-Day.
I hear you and agree pretty much on some of the testing. But, even a 40 time on an o-lineman can help a bit in scouting. Is the guy a complete athletic slug? Does he have a lingering injury? Does he just not like to stay in shape? It's a piece of the puzzle.
OK I'll buy that because there's never an issue about having too much info on a prospect but often there is a problem with too little intel.
 

Texansphan

All Pro
Guess I should have read the article. The teams may have timed these guys during the spring or something. I think some college coaches let scouts come in to see practice, just can't talk to the underclassmen. Could be legit numbers. Just don't know which is real and which is a guess.

I hear you and agree pretty much on some of the testing. But, even a 40 time on an o-lineman can help a bit in scouting. Is the guy a complete athletic slug? Does he have a lingering injury? Does he just not like to stay in shape? It's a piece of the puzzle.
I'm more interested in his shuttle and cone drills - shows how agile and good on their feet they are.
 

Shishkabob

All Pro
Guess I should have read the article. The teams may have timed these guys during the spring or something. I think some college coaches let scouts come in to see practice, just can't talk to the underclassmen. Could be legit numbers. Just don't know which is real and which is a guess.

I hear you and agree pretty much on some of the testing. But, even a 40 time on an o-lineman can help a bit in scouting. Is the guy a complete athletic slug? Does he have a lingering injury? Does he just not like to stay in shape? It's a piece of the puzzle.
I'd say the only real importance for running a 40 for a lineman is the 10 second split. That's what shows how fast they can fire off the ball, you don't need a lineman for his top end speed. I'd rather draft the guy who ran a 5.4 over the guy who ran a 5.0 if his 10 second split was better
 

gs27

Veteran
I find the 40 yard times valuable for lineman. Validates perceptions based on athleticism. Look at every linemans online scouting reports and they will mention plus or limited athleticism. IMO all that is bullshit until the combine. If a lineman who was perceived to be athletic but struggles with consistency runs a 5.4 then he should be downgraded, vice versa the guy who is very consistent but knocked as limited athletically comes out and runs a 5.1 should eliminate his athleticism concerns. 40 time is oddly enough more of a predictor of NFL success in tackles than other speed positions. Research 40 times for tackles and corners and look at the top 10% of times. I think you will be surprised.
 

srrono

All Pro
What do you guys think about Dexter Lawrence if CB or LT not there.
Is there a chance of him slipping to 2nd round with his ped controversy.
 

Texansphan

All Pro
What do you guys think about Dexter Lawrence if CB or LT not there.
Is there a chance of him slipping to 2nd round with his ped controversy.
Lawrence has legit promise. And he can play in a 3-4 or 4-3 front. Ran a 5:05 at the combine at 342 lbs! 36 reps on the bench.
Tremendous size and power but his rush leaves a little to be desired - most likely attributed to inadequate technique. Will likely grow under a good DL coach like RAC.
 
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Question to everyone, if... (and this happened in that mock machine app)

- Christian Wilkins Clemson
- Ed Oliver Houston
- Greedy Williams LSU

Are all there at 23, who would you take?

Only available 1st round OL is Garrett Bradbury.

Other fallers: Josh Jacobs and Noah Fant.

I feel like Wilkins would be great but so would Oliver but then so would Greedy.
 

JB

Old Curmudgeon
Contributor's Club
Question to everyone, if... (and this happened in that mock machine app)

- Christian Wilkins Clemson
- Ed Oliver Houston
- Greedy Williams LSU

Are all there at 23, who would you take?

Only available 1st round OL is Garrett Bradbury.

Other fallers: Josh Jacobs and Noah Fant.

I feel like Wilkins would be great but so would Oliver but then so would Greedy.
Oliver for my opinion because he's Houston. Wilkins over Greedy
 

Texansphan

All Pro
Question to everyone, if... (and this happened in that mock machine app)

- Christian Wilkins Clemson
- Ed Oliver Houston
- Greedy Williams LSU

Are all there at 23, who would you take?

Only available 1st round OL is Garrett Bradbury.

Other fallers: Josh Jacobs and Noah Fant.

I feel like Wilkins would be great but so would Oliver but then so would Greedy.
Oliver.
Doubt he makes it to #23.
Wilkins could but so could Greedy. In that scenario, then it's Greedy.
 

JB

Old Curmudgeon
Contributor's Club
Oliver.
Doubt he makes it to #23.
Wilkins could but so could Greedy. In that scenario, then it's Greedy.
That's what the Texans will do... I think they should go Wilkins over Greedy. IDL is a big of need as CB imo and I've read negative reports on Greedy but none on Wilkins... though I'm disappointed in the las Clemson DT drafted. In the case that all 3 are there, trade down if possible, if not take Oliver
 
If Mecole Hardman is there at pick 86, would you do it?
Fuller hasn't shown he can stay healthy, I definitely would.

Same speed as Fuller, a game changer who can also play special teams. I doubt he will be there at 86. He's undersized but a game changer.
 

zshawn10

All Pro
Murphy after hearing this:

https://twitter.com/CharlesRobinson/status/1108022505850261504

2. A number of #NFL evaluators remarked that they had to go back to the tape more than usual after this last combine. Due to both negative and positive assessments. There seems to be a feeling this is a draft with a lot of bust potential – even with the strong defensive class.

3. The #NFL evals on the QB class are all over the map. Not wildly unusual, but even the top guys (#Sooners Kyler Murray, #Buckeyes Dwayne Haskins, #Missouri’s Drew Lock) carry some strong conflicting opinions. Don’t be surprised if either Haskins or Lock experience a mini slide.

4. With the QBs, several #NFL evaluators feel confident one of the middle-to-late round "development" guys will end up better than advertised. #WVU’s Will Grier has some fans (but also strong doubters). #NDSU’s Easton Stick got some love that some will strongly disagree with.

5. More on QBs, two #NFL evaluators pointed me toward what they thought was a worthwhile read on the blind spots when drafting at the position. Figured it was worth passing it along: https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-nfl-is-drafting-quarterbacks-all-wrong/

6. More on QBs: "Fit, fit, fit" … maybe moreso than usual, one #NFL evaluator said this is a class that will be defined by the right fit. That seems typical, frankly, but he said this is a class where there are "very few" guys who can be molded into different offensive systems.

7. Several went back to the tape on #Georgia CB Deandre Baker after the combine. Some concern about his speed and drill work. Once considered a potential high first round #NFL draft pick who seems to be slipping a bit in the process.

8. Conversely at cornerback, #Washington’s Byron Murphy had teams going back to the tape after the combine for good reasons. His drill work was called the best in years by one #NFL evaluator. Definitely stuck out to a number of teams.

9. Per evals, rising in #NFL draft process-
#AlabamaState OT Tytus Howard,
#TexasA&M OL Erik McCoy,
#WakeForest OL Phil Haynes,
#WestVirginia TE Trevon Wesco,
#OhioState WR Terry McLaurin,
#WestVirginia WR Gary Jennings,
#Massachusetts WR Andy Isabella,
#Minnesota LB Blake Cashman
"If you let the fans dictate your choices, you'll end up sit
 

Texansphan

All Pro
Found this one on "Draft Diamonds".
Bruce Anderson, RB - North Dakota State. 6'0" 220lbs.
It is astounding this guy could be an UDFA.
He started life as a WR and it shows.
Has some wheels, excellent vision to spot openings and an uncanny ability to stay on his feet.
Read the link - you too will be astounded at his low ranking.
Of course he is not perfect - his one weakness is his pass pro, but he is willing and has a strong work ethic and should learn at the next level.
Also plays special teams and returns punts. Sounds too good to be true so see for yourself.
 

cuppacoffee

Resident Grouch
Found this one on "Draft Diamonds".
Bruce Anderson, RB - North Dakota State. 6'0" 220lbs.
It is astounding this guy could be an UDFA.
He started life as a WR and it shows.
Has some wheels, excellent vision to spot openings and an uncanny ability to stay on his feet.
Read the link - you too will be astounded at his low ranking.
Of course he is not perfect - his one weakness is his pass pro, but he is willing and has a strong work ethic and should learn at the next level.
Also plays special teams and returns punts. Sounds too good to be true so see for yourself.
I expect Gaine to bring in several promising players from the smaller conferences. If not drafted at least as free agents.

Gil Brandt, the Dallas personnel man in the early 60's when they were a good team, was proficient in bringing in un-heralded players that produced. They are out there.

:coffee:
 

steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
As I've said before, if Oliver is there you pick him.

If Greedy is there you pick him

Oliver > Greedy

If both are gone take best LT available. There should be a good one available.
 

OptimisticTexan

Hall of Fame
Found this one on "Draft Diamonds".
Bruce Anderson, RB - North Dakota State. 6'0" 220lbs.
It is astounding this guy could be an UDFA.
He started life as a WR and it shows.
Has some wheels, excellent vision to spot openings and an uncanny ability to stay on his feet.
Read the link - you too will be astounded at his low ranking.
Of course he is not perfect - his one weakness is his pass pro, but he is willing and has a strong work ethic and should learn at the next level.
Also plays special teams and returns punts. Sounds too good to be true so see for yourself.
Nice find! I'd like to see his 40 time whenever their Pro Day happens. This guy looks good enough to avoid competing for him in the UDFA pool, I'd select him in RD7 if he's still looking for a new home at 222.
 
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OptimisticTexan

Hall of Fame
I don't view any player as a reach if the team needs fit that player. The Texans are at 23 but if the player they want is forecasted to be an early RD2.....then there could be a better chance than not, that this player is gone before 54. So how is it a reach if the Texans take that player at 23? Now, if they don't have a better option at 23, they could try to trade back and obtain another pick which isn't a bad idea so long as they think their target will remain in play.
 
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Texansphan

All Pro
I don't view any player as a reach if the team needs fit that player. The Texans are at 23 but if the player they want is forecasted to be an early RD2.....then there could be a better chance than not, that this player is gone before 54. So how is it a reach if the Texans take that player at 23? Now, if they don't have a better option at 23, they could try to trade back and obtain another pick which isn't a bad idea so long as they think their target will remain in play.
Especially when different boards vary wildly about where he projects.
The best indicator of whether a player is a reach or not is how well he plays after a season or two in the NFL. If he turns into a pro bowler, then he obviously was not a reach.
 

OptimisticTexan

Hall of Fame
My sleeper if he falls is WR, Jazz Ferguson of Northwestern State (LA). He originally played for LSU. He's 6-5 @ 227 lbs and possesses 34.25" arms and 9.25" hands. He popped a 4.45-40, a 37" vertical and 123" broad jump. If the Texans take care of primary needs early, Jazz could be a heck of a pick up in RD6.

I wouldn't mind the Texans RD5, RD6 and RD7 picks being:

RD5: OT- Mitch Hyatt, Clemson
RD6: WR- Jazz Ferguson, Northwestern State (LA)
RD7: RB- Bruce Anderson, North Dakota State
 

beerlover

Hall of Fame
Greedy is durability concerns and not sure he has technique to hold up as press corner. Would take Murphy in heartbeat over him.

Oliver is a 4-3 DT. Unless Texans switch systems and yeah I know they use 4-3 alignment a lot but it’s not really same thing, so he would be more of a specialist here. Which is ok just think other needs like offensive lineman more pressing.
 

steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
Greedy is durability concerns and not sure he has technique to hold up as press corner. Would take Murphy in heartbeat over him.

Oliver is a 4-3 DT. Unless Texans switch systems and yeah I know they use 4-3 alignment a lot but it’s not really same thing, so he would be more of a specialist here. Which is ok just think other needs like offensive lineman more pressing.
I get what you're saying about Greedy but would happily take him at 23

Oliver isn't scheme specific. Imho

He's just a playmaker. He was like the lone ranger on the UH defense, drawing double and triple teams but still making plays.
 
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beerlover

Hall of Fame
I get what you're saying about Greedy but would happily take him at 23

Oliver isn't scheme specific. Imho

HesH just a playmaker. He was like the lone ranger on the UH defense, drawing double and triple teams but still making plays.
Was open to both until really did evaluation and neither is a fit to scheme on Kirby. That’s main thing. Really think free agency signings so far suggest if either player is available they would trade back with another team who wants one or the other. Texans have yet to address OL so Draft looks to be best option and need says two quality OT’s min.
 

justmy2cents

Rookie
Contributor's Club
Which is ok just think other needs like offensive lineman more pressing.


This is the issue that keeps plaguing me. In this particular draft, with our particular situation, I hate being at #23. Technically, I suppose there is no one who is a true "can't miss" prospect. But, with enough homework, in many cases, I feel like you can pretty much nail it down. In my opinion, there are 2 - nearly guaranteed sure shots for left tackle .... Williams and Dillard. I have this feeling that Watson is a true franchise quarterback. Without him, I don't think we have prayer of making it to the playoffs. We saw, despite his high level of elusiveness, just how real the threat of injury is. I don't think Vince Lombardi and Paul Brown together, could coach him out of his heroic mentality on the field. That is just who he is .... probably beginning when he was about 5 years old. We've got to protect him, or start over - searching for a franchise QB. I fear that we will have to trade up ! I hate losing picks .... I mean, I really hate losing them ! I hate it that we don't have a 4th rounder. I'm not yet quite over the Osweiller fiasco, and subsequent loss of pick. I believe either (Steel or Opto), recently mentioned trading Clowney for a 1st and a mid round choice. My response is .... HELL YES !!
 

OptimisticTexan

Hall of Fame
Does anyone think there is a shot at all of Dillard making it to 23?

His feet are fantastic
Defensive athletes could push several of the OL prospects down the board. Let the Texans have an opportunity to land LT- Dillard, RT- Risner, C- McCoy, and CB- Isaiah Johnson with the first 4 picks and I would see a big upside for the Texans.
 
Does anyone think there is a shot at all of Dillard making it to 23?

His feet are fantastic
Zero chance but we can dream.

Just for the sake of possibility..

I did the mock draft machine (which is just an application so it holds no weight) and I ran the simulation 25 times.

Dillard was available for the Texans zero of those times.

The furthest he got was 12 to the Packers. He hardly ever made it past the Bengals at 11.
 
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steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
Defensive athletes could push several of the OL prospects down the board. Let the Texans have an opportunity to land LT- Dillard, RT- Risner, C- McCoy, and CB- Isaiah Johnson with the first 4 picks and I would see a big upside for the Texans.
Gotta use one of those 2nd's to move up to the 10-15 range if you want Dillard/Williams. IMHO
 

IDEXAN

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Gotta use one of those 2nd's to move up to the 10-15 range if you want Dillard/Williams. IMHO
That's gonna be the big question for the Texans going into this Draft: will GM Gaine pull the trigger if we are at pick 14 or 15 and decide to kick in a second round pick to go for Dillard (or another player) and according to the Draft Value charts that's about as high as we can go unless Gaine kicks in a third pick along with the one & he two.
I dunno who know how much Gaine likes Dillard, could there's another tackle or two he likes more ?
 

TheRealJoker

Hall of Fame
That's gonna be the big question for the Texans going into this Draft: will GM Gaine pull the trigger if we are at pick 14 or 15 and decide to kick in a second round pick to go for Dillard (or another player) and according to the Draft Value charts that's about as high as we can go unless Gaine kicks in a third pick along with the one & he two.
I dunno who know how much Gaine likes Dillard, could there's another tackle or two he likes more ?
Gaine strikes me as a GM who values picks over players. Wants more swings at the plate rather than trading up for a high probability success prospect because he knows the draft can be a crapshoot.

I bet we trade down in the 1st. Especially if we have a bunch of similarly rated prospects.

Unless we move Clowney...
 

steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
Gaine strikes me as a GM who values picks over players. Wants more swings at the plate rather than trading up for a high probability success prospect because he knows the draft can be a crapshoot.

I bet we trade down in the 1st. Especially if we have a bunch of similarly rated prospects.

Unless we move Clowney...
I bet they dont solve the LT issue with this theory
 

IDEXAN

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Gaine strikes me as a GM who values picks over players. Wants more swings at the plate rather than trading up for a high probability success prospect because he knows the draft can be a crapshoot.
Agree with that, well said R-Joker ! I've got faith in his judgment, his deliberate demeanor and I also like his approach in free agency.
Some folks on this Board who shall go unnamed seem to want Gaine to be a spendthrift and go thru the McNair families fortune at a rapid pace.
If he sees a real value I'm inclined to think he'll pull the trigger and pay the price.
 


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