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Will we stomp the Titans' mule?

steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
Are you seriously going to debate this matter by insinuating that KC and TN defenses are on the same putrid level of the Texans? Was Mahomes or Tannehill strapped with OB and his staff for the past 3 years? Bigger question, what obstacles are you refusing to talk about and/or acknowledge?
Good thing is we're going to find out if DW4's the guy or not.
 

Texansballer74

Hall of Fame
Yeah, well what did the great Tannehill do against this pathetic Texans defense? Threw a pick? Watson didn't even do that. Wasn't there somebody around here saying they'd take Allen over Watson? How did he do against this "pathetic" Titans D compared to Watson. Oh, and Tannehill is piling up stats against Houston, Minnesota and Jacksonville in 3 of his 5 games, if you want to go there.

I have no clue why some of y'all are so anti-Watson like you are, but it's pretty ridiculous.
Hey better yet how did he do against the Chiefs on yesterday night? Lol I can tell you it wasn’t good.
 

thunderkyss

Just win baby!!!
Staff member
Contributor's Club
.....what I did see, Rodgers after being so great got his arse handed to him last night with a piss-poor game. He lost the previous game as well. In a league where excuses aren't made....he should probably be getting his locker ready for his replacement.
I'm pretty sure they already drafted that guy.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Still love the decision by Crennel to go for two.

Not sure I would but I respect it wholeheartedly.
NFL teams going for two more than ever before
Posted by Michael David Smith on October 22, 2020, 5:25 AM EDT

NFL coaches are getting more gutsy about going for two.

Two-point conversions are up this year, with 58 attempts through 92 games putting the league on pace to have a total of 161 two-point conversion attempts this season. Last season there were 113 two-point conversion attempts across the league. Last year teams went for two on 8 percent of all touchdowns, while this year teams are going for two on 11 percent of all touchdowns.

According to the Associated Press, there have been more two-point conversion attempts this season than in the first six weeks of any season since the two-point conversion rule went into effect in 1994.
Teams have converted exactly 50 percent of two-point conversions this year after converting 48 percent of two-point conversions last year.

NFL kickers make 94 percent of extra points, so the two-point conversion is a slightly more successful play, on average, than kicking the extra point: An extra point kick will net, on average, 0.94 points, while a two-point conversion will net, on average, 1.0 points.

But coaches generally aren’t thinking about the average points scored per conversion attempt, they’re thinking about the specific circumstances their team is in. And this year, many of the highest-profile two-point conversion decisions have failed. Texans coach Romeo Crennel went for two when up by seven on Sunday against the Titans, hoping to take a nine-point lead and put the game away. The Texans didn’t convert, the Titans scored a touchdown and extra point on the subsequent possession, and Tennessee won in overtime. Cowboys coach Mike McCarthy surprised many observers by going for two when trailing by nine against the Falcons; that conversion failed as well, although the Cowboys were still able to come from behind and win.

There’s no reason a team couldn’t start going for two as the default decision after every touchdown, but no team has ever done that. Instead, they make kicking the extra point the default, and go for two a decision based on the circumstances of the game.
 

Speedy

Yeller Dweller
NFL teams going for two more than ever before
Posted by Michael David Smith on October 22, 2020, 5:25 AM EDT

NFL coaches are getting more gutsy about going for two.

Two-point conversions are up this year, with 58 attempts through 92 games putting the league on pace to have a total of 161 two-point conversion attempts this season. Last season there were 113 two-point conversion attempts across the league. Last year teams went for two on 8 percent of all touchdowns, while this year teams are going for two on 11 percent of all touchdowns.

According to the Associated Press, there have been more two-point conversion attempts this season than in the first six weeks of any season since the two-point conversion rule went into effect in 1994.
Teams have converted exactly 50 percent of two-point conversions this year after converting 48 percent of two-point conversions last year.

NFL kickers make 94 percent of extra points, so the two-point conversion is a slightly more successful play, on average, than kicking the extra point: An extra point kick will net, on average, 0.94 points, while a two-point conversion will net, on average, 1.0 points.

But coaches generally aren’t thinking about the average points scored per conversion attempt, they’re thinking about the specific circumstances their team is in. And this year, many of the highest-profile two-point conversion decisions have failed. Texans coach Romeo Crennel went for two when up by seven on Sunday against the Titans, hoping to take a nine-point lead and put the game away. The Texans didn’t convert, the Titans scored a touchdown and extra point on the subsequent possession, and Tennessee won in overtime. Cowboys coach Mike McCarthy surprised many observers by going for two when trailing by nine against the Falcons; that conversion failed as well, although the Cowboys were still able to come from behind and win.

There’s no reason a team couldn’t start going for two as the default decision after every touchdown, but no team has ever done that. Instead, they make kicking the extra point the default, and go for two a decision based on the circumstances of the game.
Accumulative season long stats, sure, you probably score more going for 2 than kicking. Just like the Rockets philosophy of 3's are better than 2's. That only works if you're jacking up a ton of them. That's not how it works in a football game. You've only got 3-4 opportunities on average that you're scoring TD. In a single game, it's a 94% chance to get 1 point 3 or 4 times vs. a somewhat less than 50/50 shot to get 2.

I'd really like to see a study for just always kicking the point vs. going for 2, missing, and having to chase points throughout a game. Seems like there's always a situation where it comes down to the end and if you had just kicked the 1 throughout the game, you wouldn't be forced to score a TD instead of getting into FG range, or having to go for 2 at the end.
 


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