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Welcome to Houston Kahale Warring

steelbtexan

Hall of Fame
You're like a wind vane... or Texas weather
I notice you didn't answer my question.

BTW, find a post of mine that says I like the job Olson has done.

PS, you won't be able too. So please stop posting things that are misstatements.

Also, if nothing else I've been quite consistent with my criticisms of the Texans org. You just don't care for the fact that they aren't going to win until they change the way they acquire players and my continuously pointing out the differences winning orgs do business and the way the Texans do business.

Accept it and learn to laugh at them. That's what I have learned to do.
 
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DocBar

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Very hard to scheme when you have a crappy OL/your best deep threat WR is gone for the season/Rookie TE's/QB coming off of an ACL.

Oh well, this is just one mans opinion.
I give you props for consistency. You would consistently blame Rick Smith for every single thing that went wrong when he was GM and there was never an excuse for
why he did what he did and now you come up with excuse after excuse after excuse for Bill O'Brien. The offense has gotten worse every single year that OB has been HC. That's straight up fact, not opinion. Every team in the NFL has to deal with injuries and players leaving via FA.
Can you give any insight into why you think OB is such a great HC and what do you consider to be his greatest strength as a HC? Please don't be lame and say his greatest strength is leadership. If that were the case, he would show some leadership skills and recognize that his offensive "scheme" sucks salty chocolate balls (he puts 'em in his mouth and sucks 'em), hire a true offensive coordinator and give him free rein to do his job. Good leaders self evaluate honestly and do what needs to be done for the overall good of the team.
 

Carr Bombed

Hall of Fame
I give you props for consistency. You would consistently blame Rick Smith for every single thing that went wrong when he was GM and there was never an excuse for
why he did what he did and now you come up with excuse after excuse after excuse for Bill O'Brien. The offense has gotten worse every single year that OB has been HC. That's straight up fact, not opinion. Every team in the NFL has to deal with injuries and players leaving via FA.
Can you give any insight into why you think OB is such a great HC and what do you consider to be his greatest strength as a HC? Please don't be lame and say his greatest strength is leadership. If that were the case, he would show some leadership skills and recognize that his offensive "scheme" sucks salty chocolate balls (he puts 'em in his mouth and sucks 'em), hire a true offensive coordinator and give him free rein to do his job. Good leaders self evaluate honestly and do what needs to be done for the overall good of the team.
Show hasn't been the same without Chef.
 

steelbtexan

Hall of Fame
I give you props for consistency. You would consistently blame Rick Smith for every single thing that went wrong when he was GM and there was never an excuse for
why he did what he did and now you come up with excuse after excuse after excuse for Bill O'Brien. The offense has gotten worse every single year that OB has been HC. That's straight up fact, not opinion. Every team in the NFL has to deal with injuries and players leaving via FA.
Can you give any insight into why you think OB is such a great HC and what do you consider to be his greatest strength as a HC? Please don't be lame and say his greatest strength is leadership. If that were the case, he would show some leadership skills and recognize that his offensive "scheme" sucks salty chocolate balls (he puts 'em in his mouth and sucks 'em), hire a true offensive coordinator and give him free rein to do his job. Good leaders self evaluate honestly and do what needs to be done for the overall good of the team.
I dont think BOB is a great HC. In fact I wanted him fired. I give BOB more slack than most around these parts because I think he was saddled with the same incompetence that brought down the Kubiak regime by the former GM. Gaine had a great 1st draft and if he hits on Howard/Scharping he will look like a genius. The problem is the division is getting much tougher.

Things I think he's really good at realizing the strengths on his team and where most of the talent on the team lies. He tries to shorten the game by running the ball and taking a few deep shots every game. Then letting the defense win the game. With the improved OL and the secondary probably will be worse particularly with the schedule of elite QB's they will be facing next yr this must change and the offense is going to have to carry more than its fair share of the load if the Texans are going to have a successful season.
 

thunderkyss

It's good to be me... again.
Staff member
Contributor's Club
Maybe you are saying that at times when the TE’s don’t have to be held in to shore up the OL they may actually get used?
If it were me, I'd be saying instead of picking up guys off the street & expecting them to pick up the offense right away, why didn't the coach use an extra offensive linemen to block & slide the TE out as a third receiver?

That's what the Colts did.
 

DocBar

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
If it were me, I'd be saying instead of picking up guys off the street & expecting them to pick up the offense right away, why didn't the coach use an extra offensive linemen to block & slide the TE out as a third receiver?

That's what the Colts did.
One of the best ways to negate a pass rush is to spread the defense out. Keep them in nickel or dime. This is an area OB has shown little ability to scheme up.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
I give you props for consistency. You would consistently blame Rick Smith for every single thing that went wrong when he was GM and there was never an excuse for
why he did what he did and now you come up with excuse after excuse after excuse for Bill O'Brien. The offense has gotten worse every single year that OB has been HC. That's straight up fact, not opinion. Every team in the NFL has to deal with injuries and players leaving via FA.
Can you give any insight into why you think OB is such a great HC and what do you consider to be his greatest strength as a HC? Please don't be lame and say his greatest strength is leadership. If that were the case, he would show some leadership skills and recognize that his offensive "scheme" sucks salty chocolate balls (he puts 'em in his mouth and sucks 'em), hire a true offensive coordinator and give him free rein to do his job. Good leaders self evaluate honestly and do what needs to be done for the overall good of the team.
Lol, so yanking Savage in game 1 of the season wasn't "self evaluation"? Dumping Godsey as the o-coordinator wasn't "self evaluation"? Lots of lameness in here & your take is right up there with em' all..So much incorrect & off base stuff in your post it's not even worth commenting on. Lol at boiling good leadership down to something so narrow as "self evaluation". Guess those other 53 players & 10-12 assistant coaches follow & grind it out for him b/c he's just a swell guy.
 

DocBar

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
I dont think BOB is a great HC. In fact I wanted him fired. I give BOB more slack than most around these parts because I think he was saddled with the same incompetence that brought down the Kubiak regime by the former GM. Gaine had a great 1st draft and if he hits on Howard/Scharping he will look like a genius. The problem is the division is getting much tougher.

Things I think he's really good at realizing the strengths on his team and where most of the talent on the team lies. He tries to shorten the game by running the ball and taking a few deep shots every game. Then letting the defense win the game. With the improved OL and the secondary probably will be worse particularly with the schedule of elite QB's they will be facing next yr this must change and the offense is going to have to carry more than its fair share of the load if the Texans are going to have a successful season.
We must be watching different teams. I saw all kinds of long developing pass plays. Again, you're making excuses for bad coaching. OBs offense consists of rush up the gut, crossing route and WR screen. That's about it. It's also just about in order for 1st thru 3rd down.
 

DocBar

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Lol, so yanking Savage in game 1 of the season wasn't "self evaluation"? Dumping Godsey as the o-coordinator wasn't "self evaluation"? Lots of lameness in here & your take is right up there with em' all..So much incorrect & off base stuff in your post it's not even worth commenting on. Lol at boiling good leadership down to something so narrow as "self evaluation". Guess those other 53 players & 10-12 assistant coaches follow & grind it out for him b/c he's just a swell guy.
And yet here you are...
Dumping Savage and Hoyer at half time of game 1 was a panic move both times. Dumping Godsey was shifting blame because OB was still involved in the play calling. I've "self evaluated" things that I don't do well and I've either quit doing them (golf) or took lessons to get better (guitar, riding a motorcycle, testing microprocessor based protective relays, communication skills). I am on record, many times, stating that OB might be a fine HC, but he's a lousy OC. If he would fully divest himself of any role with the offense, then yes, his leadership skills will be extremely valuable. As long as he has a figurehead as an OC, not so much. His offensive "prowess" is exactly that. Offensive.
 

steelbtexan

Hall of Fame
We must be watching different teams. I saw all kinds of long developing pass plays. Again, you're making excuses for bad coaching. OBs offense consists of rush up the gut, crossing route and WR screen. That's about it. It's also just about in order for 1st thru 3rd down.
Tell me how many long TD's has WFV/Hopkins caught last yr? Against the Eagles what kind of pass did V.Smith catch to give the Texans the late lead that they blew. Speaking of blew, what kind of route did WFV blow his knee out on? Tell me, what was the 1st play of the playoff game against the Colts, could it have been a deep shot to Hopkins?

You're seeing what you want to see. They take 2-3 deep shots every game.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
And yet here you are...
Dumping Savage and Hoyer at half time of game 1 was a panic move both times. Dumping Godsey was shifting blame because OB was still involved in the play calling. I've "self evaluated" things that I don't do well and I've either quit doing them (golf) or took lessons to get better (guitar, riding a motorcycle, testing microprocessor based protective relays, communication skills). I am on record, many times, stating that OB might be a fine HC, but he's a lousy OC. If he would fully divest himself of any role with the offense, then yes, his leadership skills will be extremely valuable. As long as he has a figurehead as an OC, not so much. His offensive "prowess" is exactly that. Offensive.

All opinion & not nearly "fact" as you tried to assert in your previous post. You also must be smoking crack if you believe he or any HC is ever going to fully divest themselves of 1 whole side of the ball. Even the one's you think do are still heavily involved. You & others would probably still be in here crying even he did divest himself if the offense still wasn't as explosive as you'd like....That OC would then be called a figurehead.

Last year was the 1st year he's had a real difference maker at the QB position for all 16 games and it showed in just about every damn offensive metric you want to point to. Yes, there's still room for improvement, but I think most everyone understands where that needs to happen....on the players side. Don't give me this b.s. that every call Andy Reid makes has guys running wide open. Mahomes, Hill & Kelce & the offense as a whole make those plays work a great majority of the time b/c of their talent. If you can't understand this basic, undeniable fact, then i don't know what to tell you.
 
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DocBar

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
All opinion & not nearly "fact" as you tried to assert in your previous post. You also must be smoking crack if you believe he or any HC is ever going to fully divest themselves of 1 whole side of the ball. Even the one's you think do are still heavily involved. You & others would probably still be in here crying even he did divest himself if the offense still wasn't as explosive as you'd like....That OC would then be called a figurehead.

Last year was the 1st year he's had a real difference maker at the QB position for all 16 games and it showed in just about every damn offensive metric you want to point to. Yes, there's still room for improvement, but I think most everyone understands where that needs to happen....on the players side. Don't give me this b.s. that every call Andy Reid makes has guys running wide open. Mahomes, Hill & Kelce & the offense as a whole make those plays work a great majority of the time b/c of their talent. If you can't understand this basic, undeniable fact, then i don't know what to tell you.
Are you comparing OB to Andy Reid? I can just agree to disagree. You think OB is an adequate NFL HC (and you're OK with adequate) and I think he's a joke. Andy Reid is a very well established OC guru. Hopefully you never get the chance to piss in the gene pool. :tiphat:
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
Are you comparing OB to Andy Reid? I can just agree to disagree. You think OB is an adequate NFL HC (and you're OK with adequate) and I think he's a joke. Andy Reid is a very well established OC guru. Hopefully you never get the chance to piss in the gene pool. :tiphat:
Well if your genes are already in there we’re fucked anyway.
 

steelbtexan

Hall of Fame
Tell me how many long TD's has WFV/Hopkins caught last yr? Against the Eagles what kind of pass did V.Smith catch to give the Texans the late lead that they blew. Speaking of blew, what kind of route did WFV blow his knee out on? Tell me, what was the 1st play of the playoff game against the Colts, could it have been a deep shot to Hopkins?

You're seeing what you want to see. They take 2-3 deep shots every game.
No answer?
 
Are you comparing OB to Andy Reid? I can just agree to disagree. You think OB is an adequate NFL HC (and you're OK with adequate) and I think he's a joke. Andy Reid is a very well established OC guru. Hopefully you never get the chance to piss in the gene pool. :tiphat:
People keep bringing up Reid but truth is Reid's record once he got to KC is almost a mirror of BoB's record in Houston up until last year and Reid had a much, much better QB in Smith than BoB ever did pre-Watson. I've linked the coaches career stats before, and I don't feel like digging it up again, but basically Reid had one playoff win with KC up until 2018 and that one win was against the Texans.

So basically in 6 years with KC Reid has had 2 playoff wins, in 5 years with Texans BoB has had 1 playoff win. Reid maybe an OC guru but until he got Mahomes it didn't translate into any better success.
 
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Texansballer74

Hall of Fame
People keep bringing up Reid but truth is Reid's record once he got to KC is almost a mirror of BoB's record in Houston up until last year and Reid had a much, much better QB in Smith than BoB ever did pre-Watson. I've linked the coaches career stats before, and I don't feel like digging it up again, but basically Reid had one playoff win with KC up until 2018 and that one win was against the Texans.

So basically in 6 years with KC Reid has had 2 playoff wins, in 5 years with Texans BoB has had 1 playoff win. Reid maybe an OC guru but until he got Mahomes it didn't translate into any better success.

Can we please stop comparing these two coaches. Reid has been a HC in this league for a long freaking time. He's had success in KC and Philly.
Career: 207–138–1 (.600) Regular and Post season

Bill O'Brien has not come close to this so please let this man get some burn underneath him before attempting to compare him to Reid or any other experienced HC.
 
Can we please stop comparing these two coaches. Reid has been a HC in this league for a long freaking time. He's had success in KC and Philly.
Career: 207–138–1 (.600) Regular and Post season

Bill O'Brien has not come close to this so please let this man get some burn underneath him before attempting to compare him to Reid or any other experienced HC.
I agree with you but I'm not the one that keeps comparing Reid to BoB every time. But even if I was all the stuff you linked is from 17 years ago except the one coach of the year in 2018. No one cares what a coach did 17 years ago and with an entirely different team. You can only look at what success have they brought to their current team and the fact is up until 2018 Reid had not brought any more success to KC than BoB has to Houston.
 

Texansballer74

Hall of Fame
I agree with you but I'm not the one that keeps comparing Reid to BoB every time. But even if I was all the stuff you linked is from 17 years ago except the one coach of the year in 2018. No one cares what a coach did 17 years ago and with an entirely different team. You can only look at what success have they brought to their current team and the fact is up until 2018 Reid had not brought any more success to KC than BoB has to Houston.

Man that dudes team only had one season in KC with a record of 9-7. While the rest 10 wins or better. Last season his team went to the AFC championship game. Bill O'Brien team hasn't sniffed that yet. So no sir, they're not in the same league. Bwhahaha his teams are almost always competitive.
 
Man that dudes team only had one season in KC with a record of 9-7. While the rest 10 wins or better. Last season his team went to the AFC championship game. Bill O'Brien team hasn't sniffed that yet. So no sir, they're not in the same league. Bwhahaha his teams are almost always competitive.
Wait, wait, wait I though division titles and winning seasons didn't matter. Isn't that what is always said when its brought up in regards to the Texans, that those things don't matter. Also again Reid has had a A- to A level QB since he got there in Smith. Having a good QB from day one helps a lot.
 

Texansballer74

Hall of Fame
Wait, wait, wait I though division titles and winning seasons didn't matter. Isn't that what is always said when its brought up in regards to the Texans, that those things don't matter. Also again Reid has had a A- to A level QB since he got there in Smith. Having a good QB from day one helps a lot.

You never seen me write anything like that. I've always commended the Texans for winning the division every freaking time.

And whose fault is that. Obrien hand picked those QB'S . So let's not start with the excuses .
 

Dejaview

Rookie
You never seen me write anything like that. I've always commended the Texans for winning the division every freaking time.

And whose fault is that. Obrien hand picked those QB'S . So let's not start with the excuses .
Hand picked from what? The scrap heap. What franchise QB was there to be handpicked? That position had been neglected for years...like the OL, S position, CB’s, RB’s, tE’s.....and so on and on.
 
You never seen me write anything like that. I've always commended the Texans for winning the division every freaking time.

And whose fault is that. Obrien hand picked those QB'S . So let's not start with the excuses .
I'm not making excuses and yes I know and agree that he picked them. I've never said BoB was a great OC, in fact said the opposite, but this BS about how great Reid is annoys me. Reid had one good year, by the standards that people on here judge BoB, with KC and that was last year. You can bring up SBs and all the other stuff but that was all 17 years ago with a different team, none of it matters today.

Truth be told I will be surprised if KC is as good next year because now defenses have game tape on Mahomes. Rookie QBs tend to have great first years, if they have any talent at all, and a big part of that is defenses haven't adjusted to them. Look at Dak in Dallas his first year or hell Watson his first year here before he went down himself. There is a reason they say the sophomore year is the real test year of a new QB.
 

Texansballer74

Hall of Fame
I'm not making excuses and yes I know and agree that he picked them. I've never said BoB was a great OC, in fact said the opposite, but this BS about how great Reid is annoys me. Reid had one good year, by the standards that people on here judge BoB, with KC and that was last year. You can bring up SBs and all the other stuff but that was all 17 years ago with a different team, none of it matters today.

Truth be told I will be surprised if KC is as good next year because now defenses have game tape on Mahomes. Rookie QBs tend to have great first years, if they have any talent at all, and a big part of that is defenses haven't adjusted to them especially if the rookie came in because the starter went down. Look at Dak in Dallas his first year or hell Watson his first year here before he went down himself. There is a reason they say the sophomore year is the real test year of a new QB.

That's his resume so yes it matters. Thus the reason why I said it doesn't make sense to compare these two Head Coaches.

As far as hitting the sophomore wall for Mahomes. That is a strong possibility but the system that Ried employees will help the youngster out.
 

Texansballer74

Hall of Fame
Hand picked from what? The scrap heap. What franchise QB was there to be handpicked? That position had been neglected for years...like the OL, S position, CB’s, RB’s, tE’s.....and so on and on.

He didn't have to go with those QBs he thought would work in his system because they played for New England. Or Fitzgerald who has been a starter in this league for a long time. Plus his educational background. They could've should've been drafted their franchise QB. But this man wanted a player who had experience in his system.
 

steelbtexan

Hall of Fame
I'm not making excuses and yes I know and agree that he picked them. I've never said BoB was a great OC, in fact said the opposite, but this BS about how great Reid is annoys me. Reid had one good year, by the standards that people on here judge BoB, with KC and that was last year. You can bring up SBs and all the other stuff but that was all 17 years ago with a different team, none of it matters today.

Truth be told I will be surprised if KC is as good next year because now defenses have game tape on Mahomes. Rookie QBs tend to have great first years, if they have any talent at all, and a big part of that is defenses haven't adjusted to them. Look at Dak in Dallas his first year or hell Watson his first year here before he went down himself. There is a reason they say the sophomore year is the real test year of a new QB.
Mahomes is different.
 
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steelbtexan

Hall of Fame
He didn't have to go with those QBs he thought would work in his system because they played for New England. Or Fitzgerald who has been a starter in this league for a long time. Plus his educational background. They could've should've been drafted their franchise QB. But this man wanted a player who had experience in his system.
Agreed and those guys were placeholders until THEY could find their QB

I will never believe that BOB wanted Os
 

zshawn10

All Pro
His mother worried he didn’t like football, and teammates laughed at him when he couldn’t answer a basic question. Yet on his way to the NFL, Kahale Warring lived up to his name.

On the unflappable attitude behind the #Texans rookie’s rapid ascent: https://t.co/1PkYnWWfU2

Late in his first fall semester at San Diego State, Kahale Warring and his mother sat away from the student section at an on-campus basketball game so they didn’t have to stand and cheer. Instead, Warring’s mother could actually talk to him and get an answer to a question she kept wondering. Was he happy? Nichole Longeway feared her 18-year-old son, a tight end on the school’s football team, would hate sitting in the stands. Growing up, he played water polo and ran track, but he cared most about basketball, which he could have played at a Division II school. Warring only came to football as a high school senior, succeeding on tools and instincts. As a walk-on at San Diego State, he still barely understood the sport. His mom, who gave birth to him at 17, feared that he longed for familiarity as he transitioned from his small Northern California hometown of Sonora, in the foothills of Yosemite National Park, to college in a much bigger city. But as they settled into a quieter pocket of San Diego State’s Viejas Arena, Warring surprised his mother. "I’m so glad I’m not playing basketball," he told her. In fact, he said he was having the best time of his life. There were the expected reasons — the freedom most freshmen find, and the opportunity to surf every day for a kid who spent summers with his father in Oahu, Hawaii — but football was helping, too.

Standing 6-foot-5 and weighing just 200 pounds at the time, Warring had mostly exhausted his potential in basketball, and he couldn’t stand the idea of being nothing more than a tweener who played Division II ball. As a football player, Warring had so much room to grow (literally) and so much to learn about the game (including how many men are on the field) that the challenges seemed infinite and exciting. "Kahale gets really focused if he’s into something," said Lloyd Longeway, who became Warring’s stepdad when he was 5 years old. "He’ll submerge himself into it. He’ll get around anybody who can help him learn more about football." That attitude should help him now, after a rapid progression turned him into the latest tight end to come to Houston by nontraditional means. The Texans picked him in the third round for his upside and the unfazed approach he displayed at San Diego State, where he faced a daunting learning curve that should be just as steep in the NFL. Houston coach Bill O’Brien, while praising Warring’s first practice as a Texan, said the 22-year-old rookie is "not there yet." He’s come a long way, though, from being the boy his mother worried about. Working out in the San Diego State football weight room early in his freshman year, Warring found himself with two older, bigger tight ends. Starters, they each outweighed Warring by about 50 pounds and, to him, represented the player he hoped to become. Fixated on the pursuit, Warring turned to the school’s offensive line coach and asked: "When am I going to look like that?"

Before his final year of high school, Warring had pondered an even simpler question: Should I play football at all? As a child, he rarely watched the sport on TV. Instead, he grew up idolizing LeBron James and even went to the NBA star’s King’s Academy basketball camp outside of San Diego. He once expressed interest in football as a fourth grader, but his mom and stepdad thought he was too young for so much contact. When he neared his senior year of high school, though, they became more supportive. "You might regret not playing football," Nichole told her son. She knew her brothers made lasting memories during their high school careers, and she thought Kahale might do the same, just for a season, before he continued to play either basketball or water polo in college. Warring admits now that he "just played to have fun." Sonora High’s 7-on-7 summers workouts provided him with his first taste of football. Coaches were in the huddle, able to tell Warring where to stand and what route to run. It was the perfect introduction, yet Warring still quit. He was holding onto hopes of playing Division I basketball, and he didn’t want to risk injury. He decided he would stick with water polo that fall, but one practice into his return to the pool, Warring, a goalie, found the sport less exciting. "I’m having more fun playing football," he told Sonora head coach Bryan Craig. "Will you take me back?" The soft hands Warring had displayed in 7-on-7, along with the projectable frame he possessed, gave Craig an obvious answer. "Uh, yes." Warring earned all-league accolades during that one season of high school football — impressive, considering he didn’t know what a slant route was. He learned only what each play required of him, kept a labeled route tree on a wristband and thrived purely off athleticism. "Everyone congratulates me on him making the NFL," Craig said. "He’s also 6-5, 250 pounds. I didn’t do that. I did show him what a football looks like, though."

Craig figured Warring would receive a scholarship to an FCS school, such as Sacramento State or the University of San Diego. But those schools only offered walk-on spots. So Warring followed the opportunity at the biggest football program that gave him a chance, the San Diego State Aztecs. When reviewing Warring’s film and deciding to offer him a preferred walk-on spot, the school’s coaching staff came to a quick consensus: "Athletic," said Doug Deakin, Warring’s college position coach. "Has no idea what he’s doing, but athletic." The coaches didn’t realize just how little Warring understood about football until he sat in one of his first special teams meetings. San Diego State offensive coordinator Jeff Horton asked Warring how many men are on the field for any football play, and the freshman didn’t know. "When coach says get on the field, I go in," Warring replied. Teammates burst out laughing at him, and he laughed, too, in a nervous way, an attempt to hide his embarrassment. "He knew very little of the game of football," Deakin said. "The rules, the context of the situation, anything in between."

Rather than let his ignorance ruin his confidence, though, Warring learned from each basic mistake. His coaches figure he continued to believe in himself because even he could see how naturally talented he was and how physically imposing he could be. He knew that once he grew to be like those older tight ends in the weight room, the same teammates laughing at him wouldn’t want to challenge him in a one-on-one setting. Once, Warring caught a ball in the flat during a practice and failed to stiff-arm a smaller cornerback. He realized he should have dropped his shoulder to truck the defender instead, and when he came back to the huddle, he just smiled. "Well, that didn’t work," he said. Warring steadily figured out what did work. After redshirting during his first year on campus, his first collegiate catch was a touchdown. A week later, he scored another, against South Alabama, and to celebrate, he held the football in his left hand and pretended to slit his throat with it, a 15-yard penalty. "I’m so sorry," Warring told his coaches as he came back to the sideline. "I was so pumped up." "You couldn’t help but smile," Deakin said. "The lightbulb, you could just see it in his eyes." In his final season at San Diego State, Warring led the team with 31 catches. San Diego State coaches had learned what Warring’s mother knew ever since he mimicked tennis swings while watching matches on TV: that her son wasn’t a great listener and learned best by doing. With enough practice, he became a more polished route runner, someone coaches felt increasingly comfortable using as the first read in play action. He began to block opponents by putting his hands on their chest plate, not the edges of their shoulder pads.

His draft stock rose high enough that he didn’t need to stay for his redshirt senior year. The NFL loves projects, and Warring is an especially tantalizing one. He had some of the best broad and vertical jumps of any tight end at this year’s combine, and his physical gifts should only flourish more if he taps into his vast potential. "He learns every day," O’Brien said. The Texans selected Warring with the 86th overall pick, making him the seventh tight end off the board. In Houston, general manager Brian Gaine, who drafted two tight ends just a year earlier, explained the surprising selection simply by saying Warring was the best available player. In Sonora, Warring’s high school coaches exchanged excited and incredulous messages. If they needed a reminder of just how far Warring had come, this was it. No longer the skinny kid who needed everything explained in 7-on-7, Warring’s bright future and bulging muscles now match the name his mother and Hawaiian father gave him when he came into the world as a 9.4-ounce baby: Kahalekuiokalani translates to "sturdy house of the heavens."

As he ran down the sideline and toward the end zone during the first practice of Texans rookie minicamp, with no pads on and the sleeves of his jersey rolled up to show off his hulking shoulders, Warring looked the part of an NFL tight end. But challenges await him, both on the field and in his playbook. Warring’s coach during the pre-draft process, former Panthers assistant and 17-year NFL receiver Ricky Proehl, said he still needs to get much better at recognizing coverage and modifying his routes depending upon the defense. He told teams not to draft the tight end if they weren’t willing to be patient, but he also promised that, with time, the player he calls "The White Rock" would "make you look good."

The Texans experienced the benefits and frustrations of developing young tight ends who were new to the position just last year. Jordan Thomas, an oversized receiver at Mississippi State, and Jordan Akins, a former minor league baseball player and collegiate kick returner, both struggled to block. Warring might, too, while playing in an offense that will require much more football intellect. "Playing that tight end position, it’s a lot of information," quarterback Deshaun Watson said. "You’re basically playing O-line and receiver." During the weekend of that Texans rookie minicamp, in an effort to learn the playbook, Warring made 450 flash cards. He was so busy that he didn’t get a chance to phone home until that Sunday, Mother’s Day, when he told his mom he saw the sun for the first time in days. He had regularly arrived at NRG Stadium before sunrise and left when it was dark. His life was exciting and daunting, fresh and tiresome, and as he told his mom about the first few days of his new career, Nichole Longeway felt certain he was happy.
 

zshawn10

All Pro
"One thing I think Kahele Warring demonstrates in tape that will translate right away for the Texans is helping Watson on off-script plays. This quick in is a busted play. Warring turns it into a touchdown. (Called back for offensive penalty.)"

"I think he shows a lot of well-demonstrated fundamentals as a pass-catcher. He could be a little bit less obvious when he’s blocking downfield, and he could get a little bit better shaking off opponents at the line of scrimmage. SDSU moved him all around the formation, and jamming him was fairly effective.

I do think his blocking is still something in development. He was trusted to make a lot of blocks, including some I think are very common in the Houston offense:"

This play actually didn’t count, but get a look at the process that he shows:

This throw is out of bounds. That said, look at the process of the route. Nuanced step to see if he can draw defender out of position, boxes out well when he clashes with defender. Completes catch well. Warring can be ready early. pic.twitter.com/pcGgf1rSk8

— Rivers McCown (@riversmccown) May 22, 2019
https://www.riversmccown.com/2019/05/23/kahale-warring-could-be-special-but-hell-have-to-fight-history-to-contribute-right-away/
 

Number19

Hall of Fame
Wait, wait, wait I though division titles and winning seasons didn't matter. Isn't that what is always said when its brought up in regards to the Texans, that those things don't matter. Also again Reid has had a A- to A level QB since he got there in Smith. Having a good QB from day one helps a lot.
Yes you are correct. Unless you win the Big One, your franchise is a failure. But even if you win, you have to win good. If you win bad, or if you win lucky, you are still a failure.
 

steelbtexan

Hall of Fame
Yes you are correct. Unless you win the Big One, your franchise is a failure. But even if you win, you have to win good. If you win bad, or if you win lucky, you are still a failure.
Or at least look like you're trying to win.

If the Texans want to be a draft only team, then they need to sell off the franchise icons and start over anew with Watson and Hopikins and a slew of draft picks. What they are currently doing isn't and hasn't ever worked. A SB? LOL, how about becoming a true contender 1st.

Getting back on track, I really like the Warring pick. He should be really good in a couple of yrs.
 

DocBar

Hall of Fame
Contributor's Club
Damn it people!...............take your arguing out of this Warring thread, and put your anger into the Fire O'Brien or other thread that's already full of this type of garbage.
If OB would just go ahead and fire himself, I'd do that.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
Plenty of teams do - and those plays seem to make the highlight reels more often than not.
Exactly..we just saw this in the SB with the Eagles & Doug Peterson and Nick Foles with the Philly special. That play was the turning point on both sides as Philly converted theirs and The Pats..... of all teams failed to convert theirs.
 

IDEXAN

Hall of Fame
Or at least look like you're trying to win.

If the Texans want to be a draft only team, then they need to sell off the franchise icons and start over anew with Watson and Hopikins and a slew of draft picks. What they are currently doing isn't and hasn't ever worked. A SB? LOL, how about becoming a true contender 1st.

Getting back on track, I really like the Warring pick. He should be really good in a couple of yrs.
11-5 & AFC South Champs looks like a winner to me atleast right now and I dunno about you but I just take it one season at a time.
 

thunderkyss

It's good to be me... again.
Staff member
Contributor's Club
Reid maybe an OC guru but until he got Mahomes it didn't translate into any better success.
& it's only been one year. Dude looks legit, ain't going to lie. But sometimes it takes the NFL a little while to figure things out. But they generally do & Mahomes is going to have to evolve.

I can't think of one guy who started off as hot as Mahomes & kept it up for long. I'm rooting for the kid. But Reid/McNabb... feels like I've already watched this show.
 

beerlover

Hall of Fame
& it's only been one year. Dude looks legit, ain't going to lie. But sometimes it takes the NFL a little while to figure things out. But they generally do & Mahomes is going to have to evolve.

I can't think of one guy who started off as hot as Mahomes & kept it up for long. I'm rooting for the kid. But Reid/McNabb... feels like I've already watched this show.
Big difference, McNab held onto the ball too long, way too long and took too many body shots. Mahomes release seems almost instantaneous.

But I get the Reid take, teams will figure it out.
 


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