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The fair pay to play act.

Wolf

100% Texan
https://www.yahoo.com/sports/california-bill-that-would-allow-college-athletes-to-be-paid-for-their-likeness-takes-next-toward-becoming-law-175420160.html

California bill that would allow student-athletes in the state to profit from the use of their own name, image and likeness took another step closer to coming to fruition earlier this week.

On Tuesday, California’s Committee on Higher Education voted 11-0 to pass the Fair Pay to Play Act, which would go into effect in Jan. 1, 2023, through to the state’s Assembly Appropriations Committee, according to the Palm Springs Desert Sun.


Should the bill be passed into law, all student-athletes in California would have similar endorsement opportunities provided to Olympic athletes. Schools would not be paying athletes, however the athletes could hire an agent and pursue business deals without losing their eligibility. They would also own the rights to their name and image on all apparel.

The NCAA did not comment on Monday’s vote, however has already come out in stark opposition of the bill — and even reportedly threatened California schools in a letter by implying that they could be banned from NCAA championships should the bill be passed. The NCAA also said that it would be “impossible to host fair national championships” in California. It officially formed a working group to study the issue in May, just a week after the bill was passed in the Senate.
 
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Max

Veteran
Seems like California schools would have a huge leg up on recruiting elite prospects. I'm not sure how the NCAA could legislate fairness if this were to happen.
 

Thorn

Dirty Old Man
Seems like California schools would have a huge leg up on recruiting elite prospects. I'm not sure how the NCAA could legislate fairness if this were to happen.
If the NCAA rules that California schools can't participate in post season games, that'll put a huge damper on recruitment in California.
 

Max

Veteran
If the NCAA rules that California schools can't participate in post season games, that'll put a huge damper on recruitment in California.
Seems like the NCAA is going to have a mess on their hands as other states would likely follow suit. I'm not sure though that a post season ban would stop kids from turning down big $ but maybe. Very interesting.
 

Thorn

Dirty Old Man
At some point this will happen anyway. How it all plays out will be interesting for college and the pros.
 
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Wolf6151

All Pro
The old adage of "be careful what you ask for because you just might get it" seems to apply here. When you start getting paid your no longer an amateur and become subject to taxes on that new salary, and all the other benefits college athletes now receive ie: scholarship value, books, meal plan, housing, tutor services, medical plans, parking fees, etc...
 

Mollywhopper

Facilitator
Staff member
The old adage of "be careful what you ask for because you just might get it" seems to apply here. When you start getting paid your no longer an amateur and become subject to taxes on that new salary, and all the other benefits college athletes now receive ie: scholarship value, books, meal plan, housing, tutor services, medical plans, parking fees, etc...
Why would any of that stuff be in jeopardy? The schools nor the ncaa are going to be paying the kids.

They're just being allowed to profit off their name and likeness in an extracurricular way like everyone else exploits off of them already.
 

Max

Veteran
I've read up on this a little more and to me, it looks like California is flexing their muscle in a game of chicken w/ the NCAA. They have one of the largest college football media markets and they're betting that the NCAA won't declare these players or schools ineligible because of that. California was smart to push the enactment of the law out until 2023 IMO -- guessing that they're counting on other states following suit in the meantime and if that starts to happen, there's nothing that the NCAA will be able to do but to capitulate. My read is that it seems inevitable that this is going to happen at some point. Hopefully the rules are the same for every state so that some schools don't draw better recruits than others because of $. My concern is that even if the rules are the same for every state, it's not difficult to imagine schools with alumni that have deep pockets having advantages over schools with alumni that don't. The worst scenario (IMO) would be a super wealthy donor (ala T Boone Pickens Oklahoma State) scenario where the wealthy dude is willing to donate enormous amounts of money to a college and essentially build a dynasty for his school and 'sponsor' the best talent in the country to come to his school. Wearing a t-shirt around campus with the rich dude's company name could be considered 'sponsorship' and someone could essentially buy the best talent in the country. If the power is being wrested from the NCAA's hands to legislate these matters, who's to stop wealthy guys buying dynasties for their schools? Is there going to be limits set on how much players can receive? And if so, who is going to enforce it? To me, it seems like there needs to be a legislative body in charge of all the rules which we already have w/ the NCAA. I'm OK w/ California nudging the NCAA in the right direction, but I'm hoping that once this is achieved, that the NCAA will be able to continue to legislate as they have or I think there could be a huge mess at some point with states pulling in different directions.
 

OptimisticTexan

Hall of Fame
I've read up on this a little more and to me, it looks like California is flexing their muscle in a game of chicken w/ the NCAA. They have one of the largest college football media markets and they're betting that the NCAA won't declare these players or schools ineligible because of that. California was smart to push the enactment of the law out until 2023 IMO -- guessing that they're counting on other states following suit in the meantime and if that starts to happen, there's nothing that the NCAA will be able to do but to capitulate. My read is that it seems inevitable that this is going to happen at some point. Hopefully the rules are the same for every state so that some schools don't draw better recruits than others because of $. My concern is that even if the rules are the same for every state, it's not difficult to imagine schools with alumni that have deep pockets having advantages over schools with alumni that don't. The worst scenario (IMO) would be a super wealthy donor (ala T Boone Pickens Oklahoma State) scenario where the wealthy dude is willing to donate enormous amounts of money to a college and essentially build a dynasty for his school and 'sponsor' the best talent in the country to come to his school. Wearing a t-shirt around campus with the rich dude's company name could be considered 'sponsorship' and someone could essentially buy the best talent in the country. If the power is being wrested from the NCAA's hands to legislate these matters, who's to stop wealthy guys buying dynasties for their schools? Is there going to be limits set on how much players can receive? And if so, who is going to enforce it? To me, it seems like there needs to be a legislative body in charge of all the rules which we already have w/ the NCAA. I'm OK w/ California nudging the NCAA in the right direction, but I'm hoping that once this is achieved, that the NCAA will be able to continue to legislate as they have or I think there could be a huge mess at some point with states pulling in different directions.
This could finally force CFB's hand in paying these young athletes. They've profited long enough at running an un-named NFL Minor League System at the expense of the CFB player.

I still believe, if a group wanted to force CFB's hand......start a NMiLFB League and open a draft for HS Football players. It would be interesting to see how many athletes would forgo college to play and focus on professional football for 3 seasons while collecting a paycheck.

There's far too much talent out there to think a league like this wouldn't flourish while giving CFB a run for its money. The biggest leap would happen when 10%+ of the ESPN 300 or 5 Star athletes chose this league over college. I'd bet the following season would see a substantial jump in players coming to the new league to focus on professional football.
 

Lucky

Moderator
Staff member
I still believe, if a group wanted to force CFB's hand......start a NMiLFB League and open a draft for HS Football players. It would be interesting to see how many athletes would forgo college to play and focus on professional football for 3 seasons while collecting a paycheck.

There's far too much talent out there to think a league like this wouldn't flourish while giving CFB a run for its money.
Who's putting up the $$$ for this league? The NFL is not biting the hand that feeds it. We've seen one league fail before the season finished, and I'm fairly certain the next league will fail in spectacular fashion.

The best bet for the college aged players not allowed in the NFL is unionization. Colleges should pay them just like they pay the janitors and campus police. The players can accept a scholarship as part of their compensation. Or just take the money and represent the school. Those schools that cannot afford this (there would be few) would need to re-evaluate their participation in the sport.
 

Texecutioner

Hall of Fame
Those schools that cannot afford this (there would be few) would need to re-evaluate their participation in the sport.
I'm thinking that's what the NCAA should do to all California schools. Make them irrelevant after this. Simple solution for any Universities or state officials who have nothing to do with college sports who may have any future ideas. The California schools can have their own competition amongst each other.
 

Lucky

Moderator
Staff member
I'm thinking that's what the NCAA should do to all California schools. Make them irrelevant after this. Simple solution for any Universities or state officials who have nothing to do with college sports who may have any future ideas. The California schools can have their own competition amongst each other.
The California schools are the tip of the iceberg. This has been a long time coming. The rest of the big schools, whatever they end up calling themselves, will adjust to the new reality and continue to make big bucks. The NCAA is just a front for these schools. When it no longer serves their needs, the NCAA ceases to exist.
 


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