Support and keep Texans Talk going. Make a donation here.

Texans 1.3 Pick Derek Stingley Jr.

steelbtexan

King of the W. B. Club
Contributor's Club
you’re stretching and contorting your statements….as always.
Did I not say these things? In fact I got called out for repeating these things. Sorry if this is an uncomfortable truth for you. You just don't like the fact is your guy let you down and I called it. Sorry if these facts hurt your feelings.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
Seriously you are using the Texans medical staff to help your case? Have we ever, in the last 10 years seen good judgement or had good things to say about them? It is literally one of the few things we all agree on, least I thought it was, how bad they are.
The Texans medical staff didnt force AJ to undergo a shortcut procedure to deal with his hamstring in 2011…… a procedure that wound up costing him down the line in his career. Just like no team docs make these guys take 4678532 toradol shots throughout the season to mask the pain of significant injuries they’ve sustained..injuries that only rest will allow them to properly heal. These guys are making INFORMED decisions about their health….& in alot of cases, BAD decisions as it pertains to the potential lengths of their careers and in some cases, the quality of their lives after football. So in that regard The Texans medical staff arent any better or worse than these other teams’ docs. Adrian Peterson came back too early from ACL/MCL surgery…& rushed for 2100 yards that year. Most people dont know that that dude did that while also suffering from an abdominal hernia he sustained during the season that he chose not to address until after the season. Did the Vikings med staff drop the ball in that situation? No, dude WANTED to continue playing through that.

For some reason tho, you guys expect these team docs to be right 100% of the time in their prognosis of injuries not factoring in that the players themselves have the biggest say in how they are handled….& everyone is different. And take a guess at what 99% of players will do if they are given reasonable options medically that will allow them to continue to play? Dudes have literally cut off fingers to get out there and continue to play man. You cant fault any of these teams’ med staff for the decisions these players ultimately make.

Its like i said in posts above, Its easy for us to sit back and criticize the Texans medical staff and how “bad” they are…b/c the Texans and the NFL dont sign our checks and our livelihood isn’t dependent on being available to play like it is for the player.
 
Last edited:

Texansballer74

The Marine
The Texans medical staff didnt force AJ to undergo a shortcut procedure to deal with his hamstring in 2011…… a procedure that wound up costing him down the line in his career. Just like no team docs make these guys take 4678532 toradol shots throughout the season to mask the pain of significant injuries they’ve sustained..injuries that only rest will allow them to properly heal. These guys are making INFORMED decisions about their health….& in alot of cases, BAD decisions as it pertains to the potential lengths of their careers and in some cases, the quality of their lives after football. So in that regard The Texans medical staff arent any better or worse than these other teams’ docs. Adrian Peterson came back too early from ACL/MCL surgery…& rushed for 2100 yards that year. Most people dont know that that dude did that while also suffering from an abdominal hernia he sustained during the season that he chose not to address until after the season. Did the Vikings med staff drop the ball in that situation? No, dude WANTED to continue playing through that.

For some reason tho, you guys expect these team docs to be right 100% of the time in their prognosis of injuries not factoring in that the players themselves have the biggest say in how they are handled….& everyone is different. And take a guess at what 99% of players will do if they are given reasonable options medically that will allow them to continue to play? Dudes have literally cut off fingers to get out there and continue to play man. You cant fault any of these teams’ med staff for the decisions these players ultimately make.

Its like i said in posts above, Its easy for us to sit back and criticize the Texans medical staff and how “bad” they are…b/c the Texans and the NFL dont sign our checks and our livelihood isn’t dependent on being available to play like it is for the player.
Good factual post, don’t understand what so funny about it.
 

maverick512000

Hall of Fame
The Texans medical staff didnt force AJ to undergo a shortcut procedure to deal with his hamstring in 2011…… a procedure that wound up costing him down the line in his career. Just like no team docs make these guys take 4678532 toradol shots throughout the season to mask the pain of significant injuries they’ve sustained..injuries that only rest will allow them to properly heal. These guys are making INFORMED decisions about their health….& in alot of cases, BAD decisions as it pertains to the potential lengths of their careers and in some cases, the quality of their lives after football. So in that regard The Texans medical staff arent any better or worse than these other teams’ docs. Adrian Peterson came back too early from ACL/MCL surgery…& rushed for 2100 yards that year. Most people dont know that that dude did that while also suffering from an abdominal hernia he sustained during the season that he chose not to address until after the season. Did the Vikings med staff drop the ball in that situation? No, dude WANTED to continue playing through that.

For some reason tho, you guys expect these team docs to be right 100% of the time in their prognosis of injuries not factoring in that the players themselves have the biggest say in how they are handled….& everyone is different. And take a guess at what 99% of players will do if they are given reasonable options medically that will allow them to continue to play? Dudes have literally cut off fingers to get out there and continue to play man. You cant fault any of these teams’ med staff for the decisions these players ultimately make.

Its like i said in posts above, Its easy for us to sit back and criticize the Texans medical staff and how “bad” they are…b/c the Texans and the NFL dont sign our checks and our livelihood isn’t dependent on being available to play like it is for the player.
This is so wrong it boggles the mind. Have you never dealt with company doctors or in this case team doctors? If the team medical staff doesn't clear a guy to play then guess what HE DOESN'T PLAY. Its also in the CBA that a player will continue to be paid during rehab for an injury received while playing and also for the year that the injury occurred. I agree with you that players will make dumb decisions regarding their health, and many other things, but that is why a team employs a medical staff in the first place, to overrule those dumb decisions and protect the team's long term investment. Seriously this is basic occupational medicine 101.

Also just because other team's have bad medical staff doesn't excuse how bad the Texans staff has been. Also to answer your question YES the Vikings medical staff did drop the ball, just because it worked out doesn't mean they didn't drop the ball. I get they aren't going to be right 100% of the time and I get that often coaches and GMs push players to get back out there and even override team doctors, though that opens them up to a hell of a lawsuit, but to act like the doctors are there just to be pill dispensers and thats ok is wrong on so many levels. In drafting a player that has a bad injury history there is no excuse for the team doctors not to throw every red flag under the sun if they think the guy will have further issues.

Now to be fair in the case of Stingley it could be the Texans doctors told Caserio and Lovie "Hey you know this guy will never be the player he once was and you'll do good to get his full rookie contract out of him right?" and they said "YOLO we're drafting him anyway." Or it could be they really feel that they will get their picks worth out of him and the doctors agree and maybe they are right, believe it not I hope they are. I don't know but yeah given the track record of the medical staff I'm not giving them the benefit of the doubt.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JB

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Would be nice if that was the argument. Go back & look at Porky's argument. Go back & look at Maverick's argument. They're worried about reinjury.

This should be about how much degeneration has affected his play, about how badly it will affect him & how soon.

Arguing about reinjury just proves they don't understand the situation.
Per my April post:

Lisfrancs universally will leave the foot weak to varying degrees, and with chronic pain when stressed...............both can easily lead to compensatory injuries.
One year post foot surgery, ~20% of patients report moderate-to-severe pain at rest and ~ 43% moderate-to-severe pain during just walking. It is very common to have some persistent pain, stiffness, and weakness post Lisfranc repair. This can happen even after a surgery and healing period that has been considered to go perfectly.

So, although the Lisfranc injury is a "wear down" (degenerative) injury, compensatory injuries secondary to the chronic not unusually progressive, post injury/operative symptoms are all too common.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
This is so wrong it boggles the mind. Have you never dealt with company doctors or in this case team doctors? If the team medical staff doesn't clear a guy to play then guess what HE DOESN'T PLAY. Its also in the CBA that a player will continue to be paid during rehab for an injury received while playing and also for the year that the injury occurred. I agree with you that players will make dumb decisions regarding their health, and many other things, but that is why a team employs a medical staff in the first place, to overrule those dumb decisions and protect the team's long term investment. Seriously this is basic occupational medicine 101.

Also just because other team's have bad medical staff doesn't excuse how bad the Texans staff has been. Also to answer your question YES the Vikings medical staff did drop the ball, just because it worked out doesn't mean they didn't drop the ball. I get they aren't going to be right 100% of the time and I get that often coaches and GMs push players to get back out there and even override team doctors, though that opens them up to a hell of a lawsuit, but to act like the doctors are there just to be pill dispensers and thats ok is wrong on so many levels. In drafting a player that has a bad injury history there is no excuse for the team doctors not to throw every red flag under the sun if they think the guy will have further issues.

Now to be fair in the case of Stingley it could be the Texans doctors told Caserio and Lovie "Hey you know this guy will never be the player he once was and you'll do good to get his full rookie contract out of him right?" and they said "YOLO we're drafting him anyway." Or it could be they really feel that they will get their picks worth out of him and the doctors agree and maybe they are right, believe it not I hope they are. I don't know but yeah given the track record of the medical staff I'm not giving them the benefit of the doubt.
Sure, just downplay the decision making of the most important person in the whole equation….THE PLAYER.

Never said it was ok…never said the docs are just pill dispensers…but you’re arguing whats ethical or not & that’s not what alot of these decision come down to…not really anyway. when it comes to a player getting back on the field, all the docs can really do is give the player options…& like us, its up to the player to accept or reject them…We out here usually go out for 2nd opinions before decisions are made…most of them? Nope….typically if there’s a less severe option available, they’ll take it in order to keep playing…especially if it’s during the season.

A few players have actually taken control of their own health by getting 2nd opinions after recieving a diagnosis of sorts from team docs ….trent williams did…and got roasted by fans & the coach…until the diagnosis of that crap on his head was revealed to actually be cancerous…..team docs told him it was nothing. Micheal Thomas got roasted by fans b/c he wouldnt jump back on the field until he was absolutely ready himself.

So i have no doubt that the Texans FO along with their medical staff weighed in on Sting’s lis franc after getting all the info from Sting & how he feels, and speaking to the the doctor on a professional level who performed his procedure. & that guy was able to give them intricate details of the severity of his injury..Obviously, all of the feedback they recieved back told them that there was a better than good chance that he could get back to playing at a high level & play there a good while before the degenerative effects begin to slow him.

People like to point to Schaub…completely different body type, athlete and situation here. Schaub was a 6-6 250 lb….sluggard, not known to be fleet of foot before the injury to begin with…on the wrong side of 30 at that and for practical purposes already in decline as a pro player.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Now if Doc worked for the Texans would he tell the them to stay away from players like Stingley? Or would he do exactly what the Doctors who works for these NFL teams do?
He would avoid being placed in a position to compromise his Hippocratic Oath to first do no harm..........and would never accept such a position to begin with (a physician position which he has been offered in the past). He has always been satisfied being the "outsider" second opinion.
 
Last edited:

Texian

Hall of Fame
He would avoid being placed in a position to compromise his Hippocratic Oath to first do no harm..........and would never accept such a position to begin with (a physician position which he has been offered in the past).
From my perspective, a good successful head coach would want to know the truth and what he was dealing with. Also from my own personal experience, injuries to ligaments, tendons, and cartilage, I never returned to 100% performance after the injuries. To this day my injured ankle and knee remain weaker and less stable than my good ankle and knee.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
Long winded way to say that you agree with us
never said his condition wasn’t degenerative. I just never agreed that his condition was so imminent and limiting that you pass on his talent at 3..in favor of another prospect only b/c that one had a slightly less injury concern.
 

JB

Old Curmudgeon
Contributor's Club
never said his condition wasn’t degenerative. I just never agreed that his condition was so imminent and limiting that you pass on his talent at 3..in favor of another prospect only b/c that one had a slightly less injury concern.
Not saying that he won't be a very good player either, but if he's great post injury, he could have HOF caliber without it (likely supposition). I would hope for at least 2 contracts of great play from the #3 pick, not 3-4 years. I know every draft pick is a crapshoot, but that is a different argument
 

maverick512000

Hall of Fame
Sure, just downplay the decision making of the most important person in the whole equation….THE PLAYER.

Never said it was ok…never said the docs are just pill dispensers…but you’re arguing whats ethical or not & that’s not what alot of these decision come down to…not really anyway. when it comes to a player getting back on the field, all the docs can really do is give the player options…& like us, its up to the player to accept or reject them…We out here usually go out for 2nd opinions before decisions are made…most of them? Nope….typically if there’s a less severe option available, they’ll take it in order to keep playing…especially if it’s during the season.

A few players have actually taken control of their own health by getting 2nd opinions after recieving a diagnosis of sorts from team docs ….trent williams did…and got roasted by fans & the coach…until the diagnosis of that crap on his head was revealed to actually be cancerous…..team docs told him it was nothing. Micheal Thomas got roasted by fans b/c he wouldnt jump back on the field until he was absolutely ready himself.

So i have no doubt that the Texans FO along with their medical staff weighed in on Sting’s lis franc after getting all the info from Sting & how he feels, and speaking to the the doctor on a professional level who performed his procedure. & that guy was able to give them intricate details of the severity of his injury..Obviously, all of the feedback they recieved back told them that there was a better than good chance that he could get back to playing at a high level & play there a good while before the degenerative effects begin to slow him.

People like to point to Schaub…completely different body type, athlete and situation here. Schaub was a 6-6 250 lb….sluggard, not known to be fleet of foot before the injury to begin with…on the wrong side of 30 at that and for practical purposes already in decline as a pro player.
Ok we'll just have to agree to disagree because I know for a fact that if a company doctor says a person isn't allowed to work then they don't work. Hell at Exxon they aren't even allowed back on the site but I guess your experience has been different so yeah would be curious as to where you've worked at. Let's hope you are right and Stingley is able to play at a high level for years but he hasn't played at a high level since 2019 and there is a good chance he will start to slow down before his rookie contract is up. If we were in win now mode then maybe thats worth it because you only need a couple of years but when you are at the beginning of a full rebuild I'd prefer to know that my first pick of that rebuild has a good chance of being there at the end of the rebuild as well but thats just me.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
Ok we'll just have to agree to disagree because I know for a fact that if a company doctor says a person isn't allowed to work then they don't work. Hell at Exxon they aren't even allowed back on the site but I guess your experience has been different so yeah would be curious as to where you've worked at. Let's hope you are right and Stingley is able to play at a high level for years but he hasn't played at a high level since 2019 and there is a good chance he will start to slow down before his rookie contract is up. If we were in win now mode then maybe thats worth it because you only need a couple of years but when you are at the beginning of a full rebuild I'd prefer to know that my first pick of that rebuild has a good chance of being there at the end of the rebuild as well but thats just me.
this aint Exxon, this is the bubble of the NFL and team sports…. which as we know is a different thing all together. DW4 a cracked rib away from a potential collapsed lung…Drew Brees playing with cracked ribs damn near every year of his career… Getting injured & playing through injury if you can is unfortunately part of the game..Furthermore, places like Exxon are trying to prevent worker’s comp lawsuits and protect other employees from being potentially injured when they step in like that. Not the case in the NFL where all these guys are all usually playing with some type injury or ailment by week 3-4.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
He would avoid being placed in a position to compromise his Hippocratic Oath to first do no harm..........and would never accept such a position to begin with (a physician position which he has been offered in the past). He has always been satisfied being the "outsider" second opinion.
respect to you for upholding that oath…but we really don’t know what these docs are telling these players. Im inclined to believe that even if the team docs only gave these guys the worst possible prognosis about their injuries, they’d still largely ignore it and continue to try to play..theres just too much money on the line for them at that point.
 

JB

Old Curmudgeon
Contributor's Club
respect to you for upholding that oath…but we really don’t know what these docs are telling these players. Im inclined to believe that even if the team docs only gave these guys the worst possible prognosis about their injuries, they’d still largely ignore it and continue to try to play..theres just too much money on the line for them at that point.
The question was what did they tell the Texans about Stingley? I'm assuming (yes, I know) that they told them that he would be fine long term or they wouldn't have picked him #3 (I hope). Maybe they told them not to expect more than 3-4 good years and then that is on the Texans... but we will never know and that is a different argument that wouldn't surprise me being as we are talking about the Texans
 

maverick512000

Hall of Fame
The question was what did they tell the Texans about Stingley? I'm assuming (yes, I know) that they told them that he would be fine long term or they wouldn't have picked him #3 (I hope). Maybe they told them not to expect more than 3-4 good years and then that is on the Texans... but we will never know and that is a different argument that wouldn't surprise me being as we are talking about the Texans
This, my question and point was never really in regards to Stingley himself but more why did the Texans decide to take him at number 3 particularly when another player with a similar skillset and better injury history was right there. What was it that they saw, were told or thought that made him the pick? These are rhetorical questions as we will never get the answers and I was more asking @CloakNNNdagger if after seeing Stingley in the preseason games he has any better insight into what they were thinking. That was more the point of the question.
 

Porky

Hall of Fame
Would be nice if that was the argument. Go back & look at Porky's argument. Go back & look at Maverick's argument. They're worried about reinjury.

This should be about how much degeneration has affected his play, about how badly it will affect him & how soon.

Arguing about reinjury just proves they don't understand the situation.
Splitting hairs. To me, a progression of the same injury due to degeneration or reinjury is the same thing.
 

badboy

Hall of Fame
This is so wrong it boggles the mind. Have you never dealt with company doctors or in this case team doctors? If the team medical staff doesn't clear a guy to play then guess what HE DOESN'T PLAY. Its also in the CBA that a player will continue to be paid during rehab for an injury received while playing and also for the year that the injury occurred. I agree with you that players will make dumb decisions regarding their health, and many other things, but that is why a team employs a medical staff in the first place, to overrule those dumb decisions and protect the team's long term investment. Seriously this is basic occupational medicine 101.

Also just because other team's have bad medical staff doesn't excuse how bad the Texans staff has been. Also to answer your question YES the Vikings medical staff did drop the ball, just because it worked out doesn't mean they didn't drop the ball. I get they aren't going to be right 100% of the time and I get that often coaches and GMs push players to get back out there and even override team doctors, though that opens them up to a hell of a lawsuit, but to act like the doctors are there just to be pill dispensers and thats ok is wrong on so many levels. In drafting a player that has a bad injury history there is no excuse for the team doctors not to throw every red flag under the sun if they think the guy will have further issues.

Now to be fair in the case of Stingley it could be the Texans doctors told Caserio and Lovie "Hey you know this guy will never be the player he once was and you'll do good to get his full rookie contract out of him right?" and they said "YOLO we're drafting him anyway." Or it could be they really feel that they will get their picks worth out of him and the doctors agree and maybe they are right, believe it not I hope they are. I don't know but yeah given the track record of the medical staff I'm not giving them the benefit of the doubt.
I still believe my post after the draft was on target: Caserio needed Stingley to be good + for 2 seasons and I think odds are high he will get that; average + next two seasons and then if necessary he can be replaced. Stingley is getting loads of positive kudos but with people I interact with none know of his injuries.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
The question was what did they tell the Texans about Stingley? I'm assuming (yes, I know) that they told them that he would be fine long term or they wouldn't have picked him #3 (I hope). Maybe they told them not to expect more than 3-4 good years and then that is on the Texans... but we will never know and that is a different argument that wouldn't surprise me being as we are talking about the Texans
This is all my opinion of course, but I don't see NC pulling the trigger on that pick if after all the due dilligence i'm sure they did, he & Lovie were told only to expect 3-4 years. IMO what it came down to is what it was about from the beginning..potential. Stingley before the injury was viewed as a very good prospect with potential to grow into a HoF due to his scheme versatility in man or zone...Champ Bailey status. In their eyes the only thing the injury may have taken away is his ability to become a HoF...which does requires longevity. Likewise with Sauce, while having the physical tools to be able to play man, he's best utilized as a zone guy (primarily played at Cincy) & thereby scheme-limiting for Lovie who wants to be able to mix it up more. So the question came down to, do you draft Sauce and hope he can successfully make the switch to be able to play more man while also adjusting to a signficant step up in comp? or do you take the guy you already know can play man at a high level...a guy who did it against top level comp too...even though you may have lost some of his potential good years for just average ones?

I'll let you and others to decide for yourselves. If a physician make a decision based on anything but their patients's potential physical wellfare..............
This is somewhat of a contradiction mostly b/c if a doctor is truly concerned for his patient's welfare & his decisions are only governed by that, No doctor would ever advise or cosign these guys to continue playing a sport that has been likened to getting into a bunch of small car crashes on weekly basis..much less patch them up & publicly give them green lights to go out and continue to wreck their bodies. That's not just "team" docs doing that, its alot of docs not affiliated with any team too.

At some point, the player has to be responsible for what he does with his body.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
This is somewhat of a contradiction mostly b/c if a doctor is truly concerned for his patient's welfare & his decisions are only governed by that, No doctor would ever advise or cosign these guys to continue playing a sport that has been likened to getting into a bunch of small car crashes on weekly basis..much less patch them up & publicly give them green lights to go out and continue to wreck their bodies. That's not just "team" docs doing that, its alot of docs not affiliated with any team too.

At some point, the player has to be responsible for what he does with his body.
You are correct with your last statement. And as a private practice surgeon, just as a patient can choose to ill advisedly go against my strong recommendations, I have and do take the right in that situation to sever the relationship.
 

Lucky

Trust Me. I Know What I'm Doing.
Staff member
You are correct with your last statement. And as a private practice surgeon, just as a patient can choose to ill advisedly go against my strong recommendations, I have and do take the right in that situation to sever the relationship.
You can go against a doctor’s recommendation? Learn something new everyday.

Off topic somewhat, but how did the doctors at the combine miss John Metchie’s leukemia? That’s a real head scratcher to me.
 

badboy

Hall of Fame
This is all my opinion of course, but I don't see NC pulling the trigger on that pick if after all the due dilligence i'm sure they did, he & Lovie were told only to expect 3-4 years. IMO what it came down to is what it was about from the beginning..potential. Stingley before the injury was viewed as a very good prospect with potential to grow into a HoF due to his scheme versatility in man or zone...Champ Bailey status. In their eyes the only thing the injury may have taken away is his ability to become a HoF...which does requires longevity. Likewise with Sauce, while having the physical tools to be able to play man, he's best utilized as a zone guy (primarily played at Cincy) & thereby scheme-limiting for Lovie who wants to be able to mix it up more. So the question came down to, do you draft Sauce and hope he can successfully make the switch to be able to play more man while also adjusting to a signficant step up in comp? or do you take the guy you already know can play man at a high level...a guy who did it against top level comp too...even though you may have lost some of his potential good years for just average ones?



This is somewhat of a contradiction mostly b/c if a doctor is truly concerned for his patient's welfare & his decisions are only governed by that, No doctor would ever advise or cosign these guys to continue playing a sport that has been likened to getting into a bunch of small car crashes on weekly basis..much less patch them up & publicly give them green lights to go out and continue to wreck their bodies. That's not just "team" docs doing that, its alot of docs not affiliated with any team too.

At some point, the player has to be responsible for what he does with his body.
Perhaps not Champ Bailey or Daryl Rivas but I'm hoping for at least a Jonathan Joseph.

Edit: quality i doubt longevity
 
Last edited:

badboy

Hall of Fame
You can go against a doctor’s recommendation? Learn something new everyday.

Off topic somewhat, but how did the doctors at the combine miss John Metchie’s leukemia? That’s a real head scratcher to me.
I have several friends who continue to go against medical advice with their blood sugar and high blood pressure issues. One just this week decided to give up cigarettes.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
One of the things that shocked me when I worked at M. D. Anderson was how many doctors and nurses smoked like chimneys and drank like fish.

Granted, that was 30 years ago.
still like that…had a medical conference in NO some years ago. All the docs stood out on bourbon street for their drunkeness. Also Had a boss of mine……really prominent cardiac surgeon and researcher here in the TMC and abroad in his home country…smoked like a chimney. Wasnt uncommon to catch him walking to Starbucks smoking. He wound up dying from lung cancer. The hospital i work at still has a “smoker’s retreat” outside enclosure for anyone in and around the hospital who want to smoke. Not uncommon to catch nurses and other medical professionals out there on their breaks.
 
Last edited:

Texansballer74

The Marine
I'll let you and others to decide for yourselves. If a physician make a decision based on anything but their patients's potential physical wellfare..............
It’s professional football. If that’s the case they need to end it right now. And I’m pretty sure they have told them the risk just you fo your patient.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
You can go against a doctor’s recommendation? Learn something new everyday.

Off topic somewhat, but how did the doctors at the combine miss John Metchie’s leukemia? That’s a real head scratcher to me.
Promyeloctytic leukemia is a condition that is actually caused by a genetic mutation of 2 genes after conception (not inheritable). Early detection can be due to symptoms such as fever, fatigue and unusual bleeding. Usually before the symptoms appear, the complete blood count (CBC) becomes abnormal. But significantly before that becomes obvious, a type of white blood cell a promyelocyte which is produced in the bone marrow appears. The problem with that is that the NFL Combine does all of its CBCs automated by machine. The machine when there is only a small number of promyelocytes dumped into the blood stream from the bone marrow early on has a hard time distinguishing the promyelocyte from a normal white blood cell. If a trained human in the lab, on the other hand, looks at the blood smear, the abnormal cells are readily identifiable. The problem comes down to the fact that the Combine is only interested in screening as many candidates in the least amount of time as possible. So, conditions such as this can remain undetected until the CBC demonstrates gross abnormality, or the signs and symptoms become unmistakably obvious.
 

TheRealJoker

Hall of Fame
Stingley is holding up better than I thought or predicted. If this can actually continue, what a draft this will have been.
He is not Stingley-Island yet. But his efforts have been a big reason we see the pass rush getting home. The Texans pass rush and secondary is the strength of this team through three games. Besides the elite Special Teams unit. I could see Frank Ross going the John Harbaugh route from ST to HC. Its a shame teams can hang nearly 300 yards rushing on this unit and the offense can’t force teams to pass.
 

Thorn

Dirty Old Man
He is not Stingley-Island yet. But his efforts have been a big reason we see the pass rush getting home. The Texans pass rush and secondary is the strength of this team through three games. Besides the elite Special Teams unit. I could see Frank Ross going the John Harbaugh route from ST to HC. Its a shame teams can hang nearly 300 yards rushing on this unit and the offense can’t force teams to pass.
Texans just had way to many holes to fix in one year and it just wasn't possible. Based just on what I've seen so far, I think next year will be a much better year. I'm not talking playoffs, but being to the point they can win some of those close ones they've let slip by this year.
 


Top