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The NFL Concussion Protocol is a Joke!

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Rams throw concussion protocol out window with QB Case Keenum
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Monday, November 23, 2015, 12:33

As the saying goes in Hollywood, Will Smith is already getting “Oscar buzz” for his performance in “Concussion,” a movie about a forensic pathologist who battled the NFL to not suppress his research on the brain damage suffered by the league’s players.

The film will open Christmas Day so if anyone is looking for Roger Goodell we already know where the NFL Commissioner won’t be.

For the record, what we witnessed in Sunday’s St. Louis-Baltimore game wasn’t a trailer for the movie but just another example that the NFL’s concussion policy is flawed.

RAISSMAN'S UPON FURTHER REVIEW: GANNON MISSES KEY POINT

For some unknown reason, St. Louis Rams quarterback Case Keenum remained in the game despite having his head slammed against the turf in a last-second loss to the Ravens.

According to Pro Football Talk, an injury spotter, who has the authority by the NFL to “stop play in order to remove from the field players potentially suffering from concussions” failed to do so.

Ok, but what about everyone else on the field, including referees and Rams head coach Jeff Fisher?


Patrick Smith/Getty Images
Rams QB Case Keenum clearly shows concussion symptoms but nobody stops to assess him as he goes right back in for the next play.


Keenum was in obvious pain and struggled to rise to his feet even with the help of an offensive lineman. Clearly, the Rams noticed that Keenum appeared woozy because backup QB Nick Foles began warming up.

However, Keenum returned to the huddle and on second down threw a high but catchable ball that Wes Welker, who also has concussion issues, couldn’t snare. On third down, Keenum was sacked and fumbled, setting up Baltimore’s game-winning field goal.

Afterwards, Keenum was diagnosed with a concussion and unavailable to the media. Fisher did speak but was not asked about the irresponsible decision not to remove Keenum.

Maybe the real story will be told in “Concussion 2.”
Watch the video (and read this DeadSpin article):

Why The Hell Was A Clearly Concussed Case Keenum Left In The Game?
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
MODS, although this has already happened with the Texans (Foster), I meant to post this in the NFL section................feel free to move if you think appropriate.
 

Mollywhopper

Facilitator
Staff member
That one's nuts, and there can't be a satisfactory answer.

Asleep at the wheel steered itself head on into complicit there.
 

austins23

Hall of Fame
I figured the "Beard" would go in for the concussion protocol as well. He took a pretty good shot from our guy in the end zone. Hell, even knocked his helmet off. I know one of our DB's went out with a concussion yesterday, I just can't remember if it was the DB that hit ol Fitzy. CND, don't you think that Fitz should have gone out after that hit? I mean it looked pretty solid.

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/jets/raissman-review-gannon-misses-key-point-article-1.2443691

Yet even if the docs found him cogent, should Fitzpatrick have returned to the game? That’s a question neither Gannon nor Harlan raised. And not based solely on the safety issue. After seeing a very groggy Fitzpatrick they should have questioned how effective he could be after absorbing heavy impact.
 
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HOU-TEX

Ah, Football!
I'm fairly certain it's better than it used to be.....considering there didn't used to be one.

On a side note. Looking forward to see Fisher get fired after the season. Gotta be the most overrated coach in the NFL
 

EllisUnit

Trump 2020
I figured the "Beard" would go in for the concussion protocol as well. He took a pretty good shot from our guy in the end zone. Hell, even knocked his helmet off. I know one of our DB's went out with a concussion yesterday, I just can't remember if it was the DB that hit ol Fitzy. CND, don't you think that Fitz should have gone out after that hit? I mean it looked pretty solid.
Fitz did go out, it was a TD. They did the standard protocol on the sideline and i guess he appeared fine to them.
 

austins23

Hall of Fame
Fitz did go out, it was a TD. They did the standard protocol on the sideline and i guess he appeared fine to them.
Ya, I meant go inside the locker room. I edited my post to include an article from a NY beat writer asking the same thing.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
I figured the "Beard" would go in for the concussion protocol as well. He took a pretty good shot from our guy in the end zone. Hell, even knocked his helmet off. I know one of our DB's went out with a concussion yesterday, I just can't remember if it was the DB that hit ol Fitzy. CND, don't you think that Fitz should have gone out after that hit? I mean it looked pretty solid.

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/jets/raissman-review-gannon-misses-key-point-article-1.2443691

Yet even if the docs found him cogent, should Fitzpatrick have returned to the game? That’s a question neither Gannon nor Harlan raised. And not based solely on the safety issue. After seeing a very groggy Fitzpatrick they should have questioned how effective he could be after absorbing heavy impact.
If you have a zoom capability on your TV as I do, you can zoom in on Fitzpatrick after he got hit and you can readily see his eyes rolling around in his head. With that along with his wobbly affect once he tried to get up and walk is enough to have mandated taking him out and left him out. Concussion signs/symptoms, besides the aforementioned immediate dramatic short-lived ones, many times don't occur until hours later..............perfect example, Hopkins. The difference was Hopkins exact concussion incident was not apparent except in retrospect.....it was not previewed by the dramatic signs and symptoms Fitzpatrick demonstrated during the play.

No medical protocol is ever meant to trump common sense........except in the NFL.
 

Mr teX

Hall of Fame
Short of the player showing obvious physical signs that things aren't right upstairs, i can't see how the Jets could've held him out. He apparently answered everything just fine and was ok.................................................................................but then in the 2 drives after that hit, he throws 2 picks. In short, i don't know what else the Jets medical staff could've done than what the protocol states unless you're just gonna start taking everyone out of games every time they take a hard hit...
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Short of the player showing obvious physical signs that things aren't right upstairs, i can't see how the Jets could've held him out. He apparently answered everything just fine and was ok.................................................................................but then in the 2 drives after that hit, he throws 2 picks. In short, i don't know what else the Jets medical staff could've done than what the protocol states unless you're just gonna start taking everyone out of games every time they take a hard hit...
Many players take a big hit and pop right up. He didn't only take a big hit................he showed observable dramatic and definite signs of concussion. Grade I concussions are those with signs or symptoms short of loss of consciousness (self-reported or observed) lasting anywhere from only 1 to 15 minutes are minimally treated with at least 20-30 minutes before being allowed to return to play. Many neurologist will not allow return to play the same day under these circumstances.

Those 20-30 minutes are used to take the player to the training room to do not only thorough cognitive testing but also thorough motor testing.
 

Marshall

Not pretty, but ALIVE!
I was wondering if they were going to pull Fitzpatrick in the 4th after a hit that clearly left him woozy and seeing stars. But no, he stayed in the game.

Oops. I really should read to the end of the thread before posting.
 

ChampionTexan

Hall of Fame
So Doc - in your opinion, is the problem with the protocol itself, or the implementation?

Clearly, the system failed in the example of Case Keenum, but it appears to have failed due to a problem of some sort with the folks charged to make it work, rather than the system itself. Assuming the independent, trained observers who are authorized to stop play and remove a player from the game are in fact all of those things (independent, trained and authorized), is there still a problem with the system itself, or is it simpy a matter of execution?
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
So Doc - in your opinion, is the problem with the protocol itself, or the implementation?

Clearly, the system failed in the example of Case Keenum, but it appears to have failed due to a problem of some sort with the folks charged to make it work, rather than the system itself. Assuming the independent, trained observers who are authorized to stop play and remove a player from the game are in fact all of those things (independent, trained and authorized), is there still a problem with the system itself, or is it simpy a matter of execution?
I believe it's mostly those that need to institute the protocol that are not executing. The initial steps of the protocol are either purposely not being interpreted properly or not followed appropriately. No one seems to be in any hurry to stop play. And by "independent neurologist," what does everyone think.........they do this for free. True, the individual teams do not hire/pay them. But someone does..........and that someone is the NFL league and NFLPA office. Pressure now not only comes from the individual team but also from the NFL and NFLPA. How long do you think a neurologist would last if he made a couple of critical decisions to have a major player not stay on the field. Why do you think the "independent neurologist" resigned after the RG3 fiasco?

Report: NFL independent neurologist resigns after RG3 debacle
By John Breech | CBSSports.com
September 5, 2015 11:07 am ET

Just when you thought things couldn't get any stranger, Griffin's concussion situation took another twist this week: The independent neurologist who's in charge of clearing Griffin, Dr. Robert J. Kurtzke, has decided he doesn't want to be in the NFL's neurological consultant program. (The rest of the story)


WATCH THIS RB3 VIDEO

Most fans don't know it, but if for example it involves an elite player where the decision could make or break a team’s chances in the game. The final call, if there is a difference of opinion, falls to the team doctor NOT the "independent neurologist," who is very likely an orthopedist or sports medicine specialist and not a neurologist.
 
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texanhead08

All Pro
I was shocked when Fitz stayed in the game after that hit. I wonder if it really did mess him up because he threw 2 picks after that and it was almost the exact same scenario on the interceptions both times. It looked like our DB's ran those routes better than the Jets WR's.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Great article by Brian Smith at the Chronicle:

Keenum incident shows NFL's lack of progress on concussions
By Brian T. Smith

November 23, 2015 10:26pm

The Rams' Case Keenum stayed in Sunday's game after suffering a concussion, prompting an NFL investigation into how that was allowed to take place.

A 302-pound man violently slammed Case Keenum against hard, unmovable ground.

Keenum's 205-pound body briefly flopped like a dying fish on concrete. Then the ex-Texans quarterback's head bounced like a discarded watermelon that was supposed to explode.

Keenum immediately grabbed his helmet, his hands trying to reach a brain that had just been concussed. He rolled around in dazed, clueless pain, unable to stand or walk.

The NFL's safety-first response Sunday? The Rams' calculated in-game answer? Allowing the former University of Houston star to keep playing the most dangerous sport in America like his 27-year-old life wasn't worth worrying about.

"I saw Case go down. But I didn't see anything else that took place," said St. Louis coach Jeff Fisher, who chairs the league's competition committee. "I didn't see him struggle to get up."

Of course not. The ex-Oilers/Titans coach was coaching to keep his job and had bigger things to worry about with time still left on the clock.

On the same day, I watched former Texans QB Ryan Fitzpatrick's helmet ripped off at NRG Stadium's goal line. His body crashed into safety Eddie Pleasant's on a gritty, headfirst touchdown dive, then ricocheted off another Texans defender nearby. Seconds after Fitzpatrick's protective headpiece flew away, he blankly staggered through the end zone, propped up by a Jets teammate.

Like Keenum, Fitzpatrick was allowed to stay in the game. Like Keenum, Fitzpatrick responded by soon turning the ball over in a late post-crush haze.

"They came over to me … but I was fine," said Fitzpatrick, perfectly summing up the NFL's still-flimsy emphasis on the long-term effects of brain damage.

Memory loss surfaces

Now think back to Nov. 16 in Cincinnati. Texans QB Brian Hoyer mysteriously disappearing into the locker room. "Monday Night Football" trying to figure out on national TV why Hoyer had left. The real truth coming a day later, when it was revealed a concussion had created short-term memory loss in a 30-year-old man who was forgetting his team's plays in real time.

After all these years - the promises and assurances, the hundreds of thousands of unbelievably destructive personal collisions and brain-jarring hits - the NFL still hasn't learned a darn thing.

That's what Keenum's collapsed body and concussed brain showed us. That's what a quick chat and instant green light with a clearly shaken Fitzpatrick proved. That's why it was up to Hoyer to realize there was something seriously wrong with him, instead of the most powerful league in the world first having any idea.

"I was surprised nobody had called down to stop the game and at least get (Keenum) checked out," said Dr. Erin Manning, neurologist at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. "My understanding of the policy is that there's supposed to be somebody up in the booth watching."

There was. An independent certified trainer, serving as a spotter, who could and should have stopped the game immediately. Also the Rams' doctor and trainer.

The NFL has repeatedly referred to concussion protocol, which was given life only after lawsuits, investigations and more lawsuits. For a league that loves to tell you every week how much it cares about soldiers, breast cancer, giving back to the community and that super-sweet Patriots-Broncos matchup on prime-time TV, the fact Keenum was still handed a ball after he had just been thrown down like a $10 aluminum trash can tells you everything you need to know about pro football's ongoing support of its players' brains.

The NFL has obviously made strides. It's also still way behind the times.

"It's all for show. It's all PR. … It's disheartening," said Super Bowl-winning linebacker Ted Johnson, a local sports radio host who has struggled with post-career issues since retiring in 2005. "This is real life. This isn't wrestling. … These are real people who have serious health problems later in life."

Union not helping

Asked about Keenum's body slam and continued play, Johnson requested time so he could fully compose his answer. Then he wisely forced the NFL Players Association to share the dirty spotlight.

The NFLPA went all out for deflated Tom Brady and accused woman-abuser Greg Hardy. But 24 hours after Keenum's head bounced off M&T Bank Stadium's cold turf, neither the league nor the union had said anything real about why a QB with a clear concussion was given an OK. The union didn't even back its player.

"They're missing the bigger picture. The bigger picture is guys are freaking screwed up after (NFL) life, cognitively speaking and behaviorally," Johnson said. "The NFLPA - it's almost as egregious as what the NFL is doing. By not doing anything, the inaction makes me disgusted."

The NFL and NFLPA said Monday they're investigating the incident. ESPN reported the league will conduct a mandatory conference call Tuesday with every team's head athletic trainer to discuss the concussion protocol.

That's too late for Keenum.

"It might be 10, 15 years down the line. But there's going to be some kind of an effect on a hit like that, believe me," said ESPN analyst Mike Ditka, who played during a time when the league cared even less about players' post-NFL lives.

How do you fix this?

Major fines and in-season suspensions for protocol violators. Removing the murky gray line that still divides player safety and another W for the ol' ball coach.

Keenum's hit will fade by Thanksgiving, thanks to three national TV games for families throughout the country. But this ugly brain-damage thing isn't going away.

There's a big movie coming out. Christmas Day. Silver screens across the nation. It's about a big, bad empire and the little people who work for it. It only needed a one-word title.

"Concussion."

Go see it.

Watch what it's like when the NFL gets its brain beat in.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
In light of what we've seen with Arian, Fitz and Keenum to mention only a few, this study further demonstrates how offensive the NFL concussion protocol not being strictly adhered to only exists as an unconscionable facade.

The NFL's Continuing Concussion Nightmare
As a new season starts, the National Football League tries to move forward from an ugly history of brain injuries.

  • It’s football season again, a time for tailgating, touchdowns, and traumatic brain injuries. Only a few weeks into the National Football League’s season, there have already been 14 concussions. (Frontline is tracking the season’s concussions, and breaking them down by position, team, and player.)

    To make matters worse, new research on the brains of deceased former football players found high rates of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—a degenerative disease believed to stem from repetitive brain injury.

    Frontline reported on numbers from the Department of Veterans Affairs and Boston University, where researchers studied the brains of 165 people who played football at the high school, college, or professional level. They found evidence of CTE in 131 of them—79 percent. Of the brains studied, 91 of them belonged to former NFL players, and 87 of those 91 (96 percent) had signs of CTE.

    Even with the caveat that the people likely to donate their brains to be posthumously examined for CTE also probably had reason to suspect that they had the disease, these numbers are overwhelming.

    In the NFL’s 2015 Health and Safety Report, the league reported that concussions in regular season games have gone down by 35 percent since 2012, perhaps partially thanks to the league’s 2013 ban on players tackling with a blow from the crown of the head. In an attempt to further reduce concussions some teams are considering adopting a tackling style similar to that of rugby, where players tackle each other lower, grabbing the other’s legs, and hitting with their shoulders.

    Other initiatives mentioned in the Health and Safety Report include helmet testing, clinical trials for new types of imaging to better identify concussions, and the “medical timeout,” which is new for the 2015 season.

    “This significant step for safety allows athletic trainer spotters positioned high above the action to alert a referee to call a timeout if they see a player needing assistance,” the report reads.

    The NFL is clearly trying to show a dedication to player safety in the aftermath of the $1 billion settlement it made in April with more than 5,000 retired players who claimed the league hid the risks of concussions. (Several players have since objected to the settlement, saying it offers no recourse for players who have yet to be diagnosed with CTE.) But because head injuries have been endemic to the sport for so long, as these new numbers show, the league might need to make deeper changes if it wants to signal a genuine commitment to safety.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
At least Hoyer acted the mature part.
Aaron Wilson ‏@AaronWilson_NFL 2h2 hours ago
Brian Hoyer: 'I think just as far as the process goes that’s kind of up to those guys, I took it seriously, I gave them honest answers.'
The fact that "honest answers" are up to the individual players makes it that much more important that even in the case of obvious (Fitz/Foster) or suspected Grade I concussions, the formal protocol evaluations, including the motor skills testing are performed in the training room........especially since adequate motor testing requires motor stress testing. It should be evident that sideline evaluation is essentially nothing more than window dressing.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Surprise!!!!!

Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter)
3 hours ago
Rams will not be penalized for mishandling concussion protocols last week in regards to QB Case Keenum, per sources.
Yes, the NFL and their feigned concern for their players' health is beyond a joke.

Keenum is not surprisingly still in the concussion protocol.......and Foles is back in the saddle by default.............the Rams will pay for their irresponsibility..............on the field today.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Brian Hoyer took concussion seriously, has read 'horror stories'
Tania Ganguli, ESPN Staff Writer

HOUSTON -- On Sunday, while his team prepared to face the New York Jets, Houston Texans quarterback Brian Hoyer stayed home. His 3-year-old son, Garrett, wanted to go get donuts, but in his situation Hoyer didn't think that would be the best idea.

He was home recovering from a concussion he suffered six days prior against the Cincinnati Bengals. The gameday atmosphere could have aggravated his symptoms, and he didn't want television shots of him on the sideline to be any sort of distraction.

He was almost fully healed, but not quite there yet. So Hoyer stayed home to watch the game.

"If I was younger I’d be a little more brazen and stupid about it," Hoyer said. "You hear horror stories about people. I went into it, and even my wife was like, 'I’m actually proud of you for dealing with it the way you did.' I was dead serious about it. I gave them fully accurate answers. If we’re going to talk about [concussion safety], players, that’s our responsibility, too."

Hoyer passed the concussion protocol on Monday morning and returned to meetings with his teammates. He practiced for the first time in a week and a half on Wednesday.

This concussion was the fourth he has been diagnosed with while playing football. He suffered one in high school, one in college at Michigan State and one during his rookie year in the NFL.

"It was similar to this," Hoyer said of his high school concussion. "Kept playing. Different kind of reaction. Back then it wasn’t what it is now. Really, I’m thankful for what it is now. Had I kept playing or had I gone back this last week, that’s when -- when they’re really close together, from what I’ve read, that’s when [serious damage occurs]."

There was no headache associated with this concussion. Hoyer didn't feel right and everyone around him could tell. Offensive coordinator George Godsey told coach Bill O'Brien something wasn't right. After the series ended, O'Brien said Hoyer told him he was having trouble remembering plays.

I asked Hoyer if he had any blank spots in his memory from the game. He didn't want to really get into it. He did say he didn't remember the hit that caused the concussion.

"It wasn’t really up to me," Hoyer said of when he left the game. "I think people were aware that I wasn’t really all there. It’s definitely a scary thing."

Hoyer keeps abreast of concussion research. He and his wife both stay informed.

He knew he shouldn't be out there, but part of him still wished he was.

When Cecil Shorts III caught a pass and turned to throw, the camera shot tightened on Shorts. Hoyer nearly lost it because he knew the play called for a touchdown throw to Alfred Blue and he couldn't see if Blue was open.

Garrett is too young right now to understand why his dad was home last Sunday. The kids slept through the Texans' 24-17 win over the Jets while Hoyer tried not to wake them from his excited shouts. Lauren texted him occasionally from another room to keep it down.

"I want him to be happy," Hoyer said. "I want him to be happy, I want him to be safe. He already knows what I do so it’s going to be hard to keep him from it. At least for me I’m educated on it. I’m very educated because I’ve gotten to this level. ...

"You hope that kids in general, if they are playing football, they learn the right way, they learn the techniques. You’d like to see trainers, even at fifth- and sixth-grade games who can identify stuff like that . for me it’s about him being happy and also being safe. He’ll benefit from my knowledge."
 

WolverineFan

Hall of Fame
Surprise!!!!!



Yes, the NFL and their feigned concern for their players' health is beyond a joke.

Keenum is not surprisingly still in the concussion protocol.......and Foles is back in the saddle by default.............the Rams will pay for their irresponsibility..............on the field today.
Good call. Foles 20/30 for 143 yards and 3 INT's (1 pick-six) in 3 quarters so far.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
For those of you who saw the Steelers game before last night's and Schaub's game yesterday, know how much of joke the NFL Concussion Protocol really is.

In the aftermath of the Case Keenum controversy, history seems to be repeating itself. The NFL and its ATC spotters cannot continue to turn a blind eye.

Last week, Ben Roethlisberger took a hit to his head. Play was stopped to assess an unnecessary roughness penalty but the game was not halted to check for any head injury that may have resulted from the blow. Big Ben played eight more plays before removing himself from the game and later was found to have a concussion.

This week, Matt Schaub hit the back of his head on the turf and clutched his head with both hands. You judge whether a medical timeout should be taken. Although a refere comes over to check briefly on Schaub, the spotter did not call down, the play clock did not stop and Schaub proceeded to take the next snap.

To me the Keenum and Schaub videos should be used educationally as points of emphasis to get the spotters to call a medical timeout in these situations. The NFL does it for referees on rules, why not educate and encourage the “eye-in-the-sky” to stop play for an evaluation. Referees should also be instructed to have medical staff evaluate instead of checking themselves when they see a player’s head bounce off the turf. The publicized health and safety conference call last week did not involve medical personnel, but perhaps there should be one for the spotters.

Although Schaub was determined to not have a concussion, in the six plays after he clutched his head, the Ravens QB threw two interceptions including a pick-six. Coach John Harbaugh said Schaub was checked “right away”. By TV and eyewitness report, the evaluation by the team trainer probably occurred during a team timeout one play later.

Cam Newton also took a shot to the head yet was allowed to finish the series without a medical timeout being called. During a trip to the locker room for a bathroom break, Newton was quickly cleared by an independent neurologist.

What good is it to have the medical timeout if it is not used? The NFL expected the new rule to be used sparingly, indicating 10 times in a season would be a lot. I don’t have an official count of the number of times the new rule has been used but it can be counted on one hand. If the medical timeout is not used to help the most protected and scrutinized position of quarterback, what chance do linemen have of ever benefiting from the new rule?

Contrary to public opinion that teams should be fined for “missing” concussions, the spotter is not in any way affiliated currently or in the past with any NFL team. In my experience, the league has done a good job in selecting qualified ATC spotters. The “eye-in-the-sky” is chosen as a seasoned medical professional who has worked football extensively. No question the spotter job is not easy but identifying hits that might cause concussion is their one and only assigned task.

Although it is a good sign that players are removing themselves, the system should not leave it up to the athletes. LeSean McCoy and William Gay self-reported symptoms. McCoy was found not to have a concussion and returned to action for the Bills.

The NFL has said it will investigate the Schaub incident as it does all health and safety issues. It is routine for medical personnel to get calls from New York if there is any controversy.

The concussion policy is far from perfect and we can never detect every head injury. The medical timeout was enacted this year to keep players safer. The new rule just needs to be used.
link

Schaub's head bounce
 

austins23

Hall of Fame
Another SNAFU by the league, IMO. That sack on Hasslebeck yesterday should have got him into the locker room for tests. That dude was real close to being knocked out.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Yesterday, I went to see the movie "Concussion." As I've carefully reviewed the concussion literature available over the years, as well as the historic obfuscation on the part of the NFL, I still enjoyed this version/portion of the story. Although it did have some embellishments, it in general stays pretty true to facts, and I would recommend it to any football fan.

I would strongly suggest anyone interested in this subject, you take the time to see this excellent unembellished and very detailed video documentary of the NFL Concussion story and the strong-handed efforts that the NFL put forth to hide well-established risks from the players, doctors and fans. It is produced by FRONTLINE..............I am sure it will keep you glued.......and disgusted........
LEAGUE OF DENIAL: THE NFL'S CONCUSSION CRISIS
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
FDA approves first blood test for concussion
By Nadia Kounang, CNN

Updated 6:54 PM ET, Wed February 14, 2018
.

The Brain Trauma Indicator test measures two biomarkers: proteins known as UCH-L1 and GFAP that are released upon injury to the brain and pass through the blood-brain barrier. Elevated levels of the proteins can be detected within 15 or 20 minutes of injury. The test can be taken within 12 hours of injury, and results can be obtained within three or four hours.

Patients are currently diagnosed with concussion based on a combination of symptoms as well as imaging. However, CT scans don't always detect concussion.
"Over 90% of CT scans(for concussion) are negative. And you get 200 times the radiation of a chest X-ray. It's expensive; it's not terrific," said Hank Nordhoff, chairman and CEO of Banyan Biomarkers, maker of the new test. It can help determine whether a patient further needs a CT scan, based on a physician's concerns.

"Today's action supports the FDA's Initiative to Reduce Unnecessary Radiation Exposure from Medical Imaging -- an effort to ensure that each patient is getting the right imaging exam, at the right time, with the right radiation dose," FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a statement Wednesday.
The test could also help reduce costs significantly. Where a CT scan can cost $800 to $1,500, Nordhoff predicts that the new test would cost closer to $150.

The test would be available to hospitals, Nordhoff said, and he hopes a handheld sideline device could be commercially available in the near future.
The FDA approved the test as part of its breakthrough devices program after evaluating a clinical study of 1,900 blood samples from people thought to have concussion or mild traumatic brain injury. The clinical trials did not include any children, though Banyan plans to include them in future studies.

When compared with a CT scan, the blood test was 97.5% as effective in detecting concussion and 99.6% effective in ruling out concussion.
"A blood test that accurately, reliably and consistently detects the presence of brain proteins that appear in the blood after a brain injury is a major advance," said Dr. David Dodick, a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology who specializes in sports medicine and neurology. He was not involved in the development of the test.

Though Dodick was optimistic about the blood test, he said a lot of work still needs to be done in understanding and diagnosing brain injury. He pointed out that we need better measurements to understand when brains have fully healed from trauma, as well as a better understanding of how these biomarkers act which may actually affect prognosis.

It's also unknown how this test can determine subconcussive hits, "hits that don't cause symptoms but do cause a brain injury," he explained. "These occur much more often than actual concussions, especially in certain collision and contact sports,." Subconcussive or repeated hits to the head are believed to be the root of the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.
In fact, Banyan has partnered with another company, Quanterix, to help develop a test that could eventually detect the impact of repeated hits. Quanterix aims to combine the biomarkers with Banyan with digital technology that can look at the proteins at a super microscopic level and pinpoint low level concentrations of the proteins.
THE REST OF THE STORY

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This test research is not new, as it was being tested as far back as 2013 and published in JAMA Neurology March 2016. Unfortunately, as it stands now, the amount of time to run this test, precludes the value of the test during in-game decision-making regarding potential concussion.
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
Does CTE call for an end to youth tackle football?
Despite press about a recent study, a link between hits to the head and CTE isn't clear-cut. More data and a risk-benefit analysis are needed.
By Jason Chung , Peter Cummings and Uzma Samadani
February 10, 2018 — 8:37am

On Jan. 18, an article by Dr. Lee Goldstein of Boston University and colleagues in Brain, a leading neurological journal, was released and touted as proving the link between subconcussive hits to the head and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) (“Real risk of CTE comes from repeated hits to the head, study shows,” Feb. 4). That same day the CTE advocacy group — the Concussion Legacy Foundation — announced a national campaign called F14G Football to convert all under-14 football into flag football, thereby eliminating tackle football.

The message sent to assembled media and onlookers was that eliminating tackle football for youth is the key to safeguarding the brains and futures of America’s youth.

The truth is not so simple.

The scientific evidence linking youth casual sports play to brain injury, brain injury to CTE, and CTE to dementia is not strong. We believe that further scientific research and data are necessary for accurate risk-benefit analysis among policymakers for two reasons.

First, evidence-based science calls for research to be conducted under generally accepted principles. The case series presented by the Boston University group, primarily due to its ascertainment bias, is weaker than the evidentiary standard sufficient to demonstrate an association or causation and conflicts with pathologic findings in other studies.

CTE pathology in the brain has been shown by British pathologists to be present in approximately 12 percent of normal healthy aged people who died at an average age of 81 years (Ling et al. Acta Neuropathologica). The presence of CTE pathology in the brain on autopsy has not been shown to correlate with neurologic symptoms before death.

To be clear, CTE pathology could be present in a normal person.

THE REST OF THE STORY
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
NFL doctor says rising concussion numbers sparks 'call to action'
12:48 PM CT
  • Kevin SeifertNFL Nation

INDIANAPOLIS -- A surge in NFL concussion numbers has sparked "a call to action" among league officials responsible for brain health, the NFL's chief medical officer said Tuesday.

Speaking at the start of a Head, Neck and Spine committee meeting, Dr. Allen Sills made clear that the league will react aggressively to data that showed a 16 percent rise in concussions in 2017. There were a total of 291 diagnosed concussions in 2017 -- including preseason, regular season and postseason games -- compared to 250 in 2016. THE REST OF THE STORY
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The first of the 3 "answers" they make to reducing the numbers............develop better helmets. See my recent post in the Injury Thread regarding this "answer."
 

CloakNNNdagger

Hall of Fame
2019 concussion numbers have increased "slightly" from last year, per the NFL. They state that the preseason numbers have gone down significantly, but they have been more than compensated by the regular season. Their explanation is that Oklahoma drills have been banned and that lesser experience players sustained greater numbers of concussions. The truth is that Oklahoma drills had been abandoned by most teams way before the ban last year, and that there should have been a very dramatic decrease in concussions due to the fact that most teams beginning last year ceased full contact practices during the preseason.........and quasis-carried the practice onto the regular season practices by significantly limiting the contact. With these practices in place, the League should have seen a dramatic overall reduction of concussion in 2019.......not an increase. This tells me that the League has been miserably unsuccessful..........little wonder when players are allowed to get away with helmet to helmet and other related penalties by the refs.........and players having been involved in concussion-provoking plays are not identified and immediately pulled for examination and removal from a game.


NFL reveals 2019 injury data, hopeful rule changes are working
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001098679/article/nfl-reveals-2019-injury-data-hopeful-rule-changes-are-working?campaign=Twitter_atn
 

gwallaia

Moderator
Staff member
They should play every game like the Pro Bowl and that would completely eliminate concussions.
 

gwallaia

Moderator
Staff member
But that style of play would solve the NFL's concussion problem,....... and every other injury issue plaguing the league.
 

edo783

Hall of Fame
I only watched the first series of the second half. DW4 was the QB and wound up throwing a pick in the red zone. Turned over to public TV then.
 


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