The New New JaDeveon Clowney Thread

Discussion in 'Texans Talk' started by Marshall, Jun 2, 2015.

  1. edwardc5637

    edwardc5637 Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2011
    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    16
    He is going to be ok just having him on the field will make a difference other teams will have to think about what to do with him .
     
  2. Lambert

    Lambert Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2011
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    19
    What about the bone spurs.....?
     
  3. infantrycak

    infantrycak Admin & Mod Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2004
    Messages:
    77,968
    Likes Received:
    18,180
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Untreated to our knowledge.
     
  4. MasterCush

    MasterCush Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    7
    Saw Clowney in a video made within the last few days and his right leg does look significantly thinner.

    [​IMG]

    The camera angle might make it seem skinnier, but it reminds me of when I got my cast off. My arm was in a cast for 8 weeks. It was skinnier but it only took a couple months for it to beef up again.

    If he can run around well and feels good, then I'd start him day one if he says he is ready. Otherwise, I'd consider waiting a month or two into the season.
     
  5. Mollywhopper

    Mollywhopper Facilitator

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    7,617
    Likes Received:
    5,237
    I'm leaning towards camera angle. Hell, he could have a squirrel clutched his calf there and we couldn't tell from just the simple snapshot.
     
  6. Thorn

    Thorn Dirty Old Man

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    31,149
    Likes Received:
    8,235
    Location:
    Houston
    I'm thinking they probably had aliens experimenting on him. Has he been talking different languages lately?
     
    thunderkyss likes this.
  7. frethack

    frethack Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2013
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    506
    Noting the direction that the tabs on his shoes are facing, the left leg is being seen from a profile and the right leg is viewed at a 3/4 angle. Id be sure that the right leg has atrophied, but in this case it appears to be the camera angle that is exaggerating it.
     
  8. Playoffs

    Playoffs Subscribed Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    21,449
    Likes Received:
    1,769
    [​IMG]

    Texans DE Jadeveon Clowney: Balancing Expectations, Tricky Microfracture Rehab

    Great Investment. Great Expectation. And an Injury Requiring Great Patience.

    A pretty safe case can be made that last year's hottest incoming NFL player is the one with the biggest question mark in 2015. Jadeveon Clowney, last year's top overall pick, is trying to fight his way back from an injury-plagued first year that ended with microfracture surgery on his right knee. It's very early in his promising career, but with great investment comes great expectation. Clowney is in the precarious position of trying to prove that he was worth his lofty draft status while recovering from a difficult medical procedure.

    Microfracture surgery amounts to drilling tiny holes - "fractures" - in the lower leg bone plate, allowing blood and bone marrow to seep and form a blood clot, releasing cartilage-building stem cells from the marrow. Basically, you're attempting to rebuild cartilage from scar tissue. On big-bodied athletes like the 6'5, 270 pound Clowney, this can be a tricky rehab, as you have to patiently rebuild the new cartilage under the weight of a big frame. Caution in the recovery is of the utmost importance, especially in that the explosiveness in Clowney's legs is the football asset the team is likely most interested in preserving - the attribute that made him such a highly-touted pick in the first place.

    [​IMG]
    Arthroscopic view of the microfracture technique

    We've all heard his impressive football profile countless times by now. Clowney is one of those rare players whose physical attributes far exceed other players at his position, as much so as any player since another Houston Texan almost a decade ago: Mario Williams. Clowney has an unbelievably quick first step, an extraordinarily explosive athlete who can blow by offensive tackles on one play, then run through a running back like he's tissue paper the next. His size-to-speed ratio is off the charts - a quality that's as important as any for Clowney to retain when he comes out the other end of this difficult rehabilitation process.

    With any player acquisition where there is potential for greatness there is also a potential for failure. With Clowney, the most persistent draft question was his consistency...his motor. That question arose because of spotty play during his last season in college. Critics pointed out that there were times throughout his last year in college where he looked disinterested.

    That might lead one to believe that this particular kind of rehab might bring out some of those perceived negative qualities. At times during last season, while rehabbing another knee ailment, those perceptions seemed to come to fruition with the organization privately expressing concerns about Clowney's maturity.

    [​IMG]

    Since the decision late last year to undergo the procedure, the tide has seemed to turn. Texans players and coaches are now talking about how well Clowney has handled the offseason, with the team's leader, JJ Watt, speaking openly about the positive changes in Clowney's approach and maturity. Head coach Bill O'Brien, as no-nonsense a coach as there is in the NFL, also praised Clowney's work during his recovery saying, "He's worked extremely hard. I think he's moving well, I think he feels better. We'll be looking forward to seeing where he's at once we get back here at the end of July."

    Maybe all of this is just hopeful glow coming from Texans leadership, or maybe its the real deal. Whatever the case, Clowney is the one who has the final say on any narrative surrounding the kind of professional football player he is going to be. The difficult balance for him will be proving how much he's grown and how badly he wants to be out there with his teammates, all the while battling an injury that a player has to be extremely careful with and not rush.
    ...
    Clowney's competition is with his own body, his own development. Realizing his potential with his own organization should be the focus, not competing with the another player on another team. Control what you can control. Although it may sound premature and too early in the process to put pressure on Clowney to perform, the reality is when you're drafted as high as he was, the expectations are even higher. But if the pressure to perform prompts a player to rush a tenuous rehab to "prove something," the problems for his career can become just as serious as unmet expectations. The dream of Clowney and JJ Watt as an extremely disruptive defensive duo is still a very real possibility, but it will take smart and diligent efforts from team and player to make that happen.

    Based on the investment, the Houston Texans would likely love to see that idea realized sooner rather than later. Not in a year. Not in two years. Based on O'Brien's optimistic outlook, the team seems anxious for a return on their sizable investment this fall. In the end, it's incumbent upon Clowney to reward the team's patience and support, heal smartly, and harness his talent to make sure that dream comes true for everyone. ​


    by Brady Poppinga

    Former BYU linebacker, 8 Years in NFL
    Super Bowl champion with Green Bay Packers
    Author, "True Spirit of Competition"
    http://tinyurl.com/pafz5mn
     
  9. Playoffs

    Playoffs Subscribed Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    21,449
    Likes Received:
    1,769
    This is more in line whith what Dr CND has been posting...

    Monday Morning MD: Articular cartilage is the Holy Grail

    Injury to articular cartilage has ended more NFL careers than any other physical ailment. Solving this medical problem would mean the Nobel Prize in medicine.

    Broncos LB Danny Trevathan said he “got somebody else’s kneecap” to solve this problem. That is hardly the case, although damage to articular cartilage of the patella is especially difficult to treat as it responds poorly to microfracture. Likely, he has a cadaver bone/cartilage plug (osteochondral allograft-OATS) that has been placed into his own kneecap. Whole-patella transplants don’t work and are just not done in the NFL or in regular patients. It is too difficult to anchor a floating bone to the tendon and get blood supply to regenerate in the kneecap.

    In medicine, anytime a first-time procedure is done, that means either it is a new condition that has never been seen before (highly unlikely) or there is no good solution to the problem and a new technique is attempted.

    My formal entry into the league involved performing a new cartilage regrowth procedure. In the mid 1990’s, I performed the first Genzyme Carticel surgery on a NFL player. After harvesting some of his cartilage and growing these cells in a laboratory, it was re-implanted. He did return to some football, but the procedure certainly cannot be termed a long-term success or we would all be doing the procedure routinely today.

    Articular cartilage is also Jadeveon Clowney’s problem. He had an initial knee scope to treat the meniscus tear and then had to have a subsequent microfracture procedure. By definition, the need to regrow cartilage indicates a down to bone lesion. I certainly hope he goes on to a productive career, but a full-thickness cartilage defect in a 22 year-old is ominous. The good news is Clowney is expected for the start of training camp.

    Despite being treated by his team physician who is one of the best in the country, the question is how long his new surface will last. The knee heals with fibrocartilage that fills in the defect and is never as strong as the original hyaline cartilage. I hope I am wrong, but even if Clowney lives up to his number one overall pick promise this year, he would have to beat the odds to make it to a second contract.

    Limited results with microfracture lead us to try new techniques. I hope Trevathan is the first, but in my two decades involved with the NFL, I am not aware of long term success of osteochondral allograft of any kind, much less in the patella. Despite medical advances, the orthopedic profession just doesn’t have the final answer yet​
     
  10. Vance87

    Vance87 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    Messages:
    3,074
    Likes Received:
    312
    Hoorayy...
     


  11. Number19

    Number19 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 2, 2004
    Messages:
    4,334
    Likes Received:
    1,768
    I can't recall - it's been several months - but this is not something new to me. The article I'm remembering also said that the longer you wait, the stronger the repair gets. This is why sitting out the year and not coming back until the 2016 season would be for the long term best. But we all know this will in all probability not happen.
     
  12. IDEXAN

    IDEXAN Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    12,996
    Likes Received:
    1,891
    Location:
    Houston
    Need a new head ? NP ! Looks like this dude is gonna get fixed up pretty quick with his brand new head. What the hell, how come thy can't get my boy Jadevon a brand spankin new, better than ever knee cap ! Seems to me in this day and age that should be a snap ?
     
  13. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    30,077
    Likes Received:
    15,273
    The fibrocartilage produced by microfracture surgery is basically matured and remolded (to relatively smooth out the lumps and bumps originally produced by the surgery) by ~6 months. The time taken beyond that is typically mostly for rehabbing strength and coordination and confidence. It has been shown that functional improvement (degree is variable from patient to patient) occurs up to 18 months following surgery, but tends to decrease significantly after that, as the fibrocartilage begins to significantly wear/shave down and changes of arthritis from the original injury begin to appear. In the case of the professional athlete, the extra stresses placed on this psuedo cartilage hastens the process. What's interesting is that most orthopedic surgeons that perform microfracture surgeries will counsel their patients that success of this surgery depends life-long activity modifications..........and, in the case of those wanting to return to sports, to specifically avoid cutting maneuvers These cutting actions are the hardest on true hyaline knee cartilage in general, but much harder on the weaker and less durable fibrocratilage of microfracture surgery. And don't forget that removal of some of Clowney's lateral meniscus cartilage has already destabilized the knee to some extent and makes cutting even more traumatic to the knee cartilage. Limiting cutting movements would be difficult enough if it were advise given to a weekend warrior, but would be entirely out of the question for a player like Clowney.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2015
    Playoffs likes this.
  14. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    30,077
    Likes Received:
    15,273
    Double post.
     
    Playoffs likes this.
  15. Number19

    Number19 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 2, 2004
    Messages:
    4,334
    Likes Received:
    1,768
    December 2015 will be 12 months. Allowing for differences in the patient, maximum improvement could reasonably not be expected until OTA's in the 2016 off-season. My unprofessional reasoning is that, for a surgery which has not achieved maximum functional improvement, there is a corresponding increased risk for re-injury. Cushing made it through last season without further damage. This year we should see his best post-operative performance. Clowney's comeback should follow the same timeline.
     
  16. infantrycak

    infantrycak Admin & Mod Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2004
    Messages:
    77,968
    Likes Received:
    18,180
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    To translate into layman's terms - if he ever makes a probowl, swear off ever purchasing a lottery ticket and all dangerous activities because your luck wad has been shot.
     
  17. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    30,077
    Likes Received:
    15,273
     
    steelbtexan likes this.
  18. steelbtexan

    steelbtexan Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Messages:
    28,440
    Likes Received:
    8,605
    Thanks Doc for helping bring reality to the Cushing/Clowney situations.
     
  19. infantrycak

    infantrycak Admin & Mod Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2004
    Messages:
    77,968
    Likes Received:
    18,180
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Seems to me (from reading Doc and following up on his info), I'll pick odds rather than reality, are Cushing gets into the probowl before Clowney.
     
    Fred likes this.
  20. IDEXAN

    IDEXAN Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    12,996
    Likes Received:
    1,891
    Location:
    Houston

    TRANSACTIONS:
    Selected by Houston Texans in the first round (15th pick overall) of the 2009 NFL Draft...Signed by Texans on Aug. 2, 2009...Placed on injured reserve on Oct. 10, 2012.... Placed on injured reserve on Oct. 28, 2013

    HONORS:
    Associated Press All-Pro Second Team (2009, 2011)
    Associated Press Defensive Rookie of the Year (2009)
    Pro Bowl Selection (2010)
    Pro Football Weekly/PFWA All-AFC Team (2011)
    Houston Texans Team Most Valuable Player (2011)
    Ed Block Courage Award Winner (2013)
    Houston Texans Team Rookie of the Year (2009)
    AFC Defensive Player of the Week (Week 6, 2009; Week 8, 2009)
    NFL Defensive Rookie of the Month (November, 2009; December, 2009)
    Pro Football Weekly/PFWA Defensive Rookie of the Year (2009)
    Pro Football Weekly/PFWA All-Rookie Team (2009)
    GMC Never Say Never Moment of the Week for Week 1 fourth-quarter interception return for a touchdown at San Diego
    http://www.houstontexans.com/team/roster/Brian-Cushing/6807ee1b-2f18-4c4c-bbaa-17c0ed9f0635
    ****
    My advise to you would be to make that bet all day long if you can.
     

Share This Page