NFL Random Thought of the Day

Discussion in 'The National Football League' started by Wolf, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. Wolf

    Wolf 100% Texan

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    Cleve gave him 4 year 50 million with 26 guaranteed
    Per sports ap. Just a follow up
     
  2. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    The Injury Report is too often manipulated and inaccurate.......and becoming more of a joke.,,,,,,,,,,,and the NFL looking the other way finds yet another way to display its spreading hypocrisy.

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    NFL has a dilemma over undisclosed Le’Veon Bell injury


    One week after Seahawks coach Pete Carroll admitted that the team had failed to disclose a knee injury suffered during the season by cornerback Richard Sherman, the Steelers have acknowledged the failure to disclose a groin injury to running back Le’Veon Bell. Unlike the Seahawks, however, the Steelers have stopped short of admitting that Bell’s injury required disclosure under the league’s injury report policy.

    It was no coincidence that coach Mike Tomlin, in admitting that he knew about Bell’s groin injury, said that the injury “wasn’t significant.” Tomlin specifically was staying on the right side of the injury reporting policy.

    The injury report policy specifically requires the disclosure of only “significant or noteworthy injuries” on the Practice Report. So the argument from the Steelers would be that, because Bell’s injury was not “significant,” it didn’t need to be disclosed.

    Here’s the problem with that argument. Bell had been missing practice time. Each of the three Wednesdays before the team’s playoff games, Bell didn’t practice. Last Thursday, he missed practice for “personal reasons.”

    The circumstances put the league office in a tough spot. If Bell missed no practice time, the folks at 345 Park Avenue could say, “The injury wasn’t significant, and Bell participated in all practices and games.” Since Bell missed four of nine practices over a three-week period with the “not injury related” designation at a time when Bell had a groin injury, the league will have a hard time burying its head in the sand on this one.

    The availble evidence suggests that the “management” of Bell’s injury included giving him days off that deliberately were characterized as “not injury related” in order to conceal the injury. Without exploring the situation in further detail, there’s no way to know the truth.

    But any investigation would expose just how easy it is to fudge the injury reports, something that pretty much every team does at one time or another, justified in part by the belief that everyone else is doing it, so we may as well do it, too.

    Bottom line? The league would prefer to stay out of the injury report rabbit hole, because eventually it will become too clear to too many people that cheating on the injury report is widespread. The problem is that, between the Seahawks last week and the Steelers this week, the NFL may have no choice but to wallow in the reality that the hiding of injuries happens a lot more frequently than the average fan realizes.
     
  3. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Rules are not made to be followed. Evidently, the joke that is the NFL continues.
     
  4. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Colts have revealed their list of GM interviews: Chris Ballard, Scott Fitterer, Trent Kirchner, George Paton, Jimmy Raye III, Eliot Wolf
     
  5. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Safety, though, is the NFL main concern..............
     
  6. cuppacoffee

    cuppacoffee Resident Grouch

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    Kinda reminds me of NSZ thread in the past about speed limit signs (rules). Don't really mean what they say, it's just a suggestion. If everybody speeds it's ok for you (generic) to speed. It's today's entitled society. I do what I please, rules are for the other guy.

    Pete Carrolls cheating goes way back to his USC days. Reggie Bush is the prime example.

    :coffee:
     
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  7. infantrycak

    infantrycak Mod. Staff Member

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    Not at all what was said in that thread, but carry on.
     
  8. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Roger Goodell: Vegas or not, we won’t compromise gambling policies
    January 26, 2017, 8:30 AM EST
    The NFL has a longstanding and fierce opposition to gambling, which is why many people doubted a team would ever play in Las Vegas. Now it appears that the Raiders will move to Las Vegas, but Commissioner Roger Goodell insists that the league’s stance on gambling hasn’t changed.

    Asked by Colin Cowherd if the NFL is softening its opposition to gambling, as the NBA has under Commissioner Adam Silver, Goodell indicated that playing in America’s gambling capital doesn’t signal a shift for the NFL.

    “We’ve seen the changes in the culture around the country in gambling,” Goodell said. “We’re obviously very sensitive to that, but we’re also going to evaluate the Raiders case on the relocation application in what’s in the overall best interests of the league. But one thing we can’t ever do is compromise on the game. That’s one of the things we’ll do is to make sure the policies we’ve created, if we did in any way approve the Raiders, I don’t see us compromising on any of the policies.”

    In other words, the league is considering a move to Las Vegas because the taxpayers there are willing to devote hundreds of millions of dollars to a stadium, and the taxpayers in Oakland aren’t. As far as the NFL is concerned, that’s a separate issue from gambling.

    ***********************************************************************************************************

    Won't compromise gambling policies????? :spit::spit:


    ***********************************************************************************************************


    Why The NFL's Stance Against Gambling Is Complete BS

    July 25, 2009

    In case you've missed it, the state of Delaware legalized sports gambling. The state is hoping to raise revenue through sports gambling by allowing betting on single games in all of the major sports leagues as well as on college sports.

    Delaware would basically become a giant sports book. This is possible because the state previously had legalized sports gambling in 1979 when it ran a football "lottery." This so-called lottery was in actuality parlay cards and were only played on NFL games. Due to various factors, Delaware's original sports lottery lasted only a few short weeks before it was shut down.

    When Congress passed a law outlawing sports gambling nationwide in 1992, it "grandfathered" in four states - Nevada, Delaware, Montana and Oregon - all of which had previously legalized some form of sports wagering.

    Now due to the economic slump the state is in, Delaware believes returning to sports wagering will bring in millions of dollars to the suffering state. And professional sports are not happy about it.

    The four major leagues - NFL, NBA, NHL, and MLB - along with the NCAA has filed suit against the state attempting to stop the institution of this sports wagering plan.

    The suit states that Delaware's plan ""would irreparably harm professional and amateur sports by fostering suspicion and skepticism that individual plays and final scores of games may have been influenced by factors other than honest athletic competition."

    While that sounds all well and good to the public, the fact is even without legalized sports gambling, professional sports has a history of game fixing dating back to the mid-1800s (yes, the 1800s) which continues to this very day.

    Also, a huge majority of current sports wagering is conducted illegally and through underground bookies, most of which are connected to organized crime. While no one knows for certain how much is being wagered illegally, the best estimates reach into the hundreds of billions of dollars a year.

    Since the mid-1960s, the NFL has always publicly been against any form of wagering on its games, citing a similar stance taken to the one in the current lawsuit against Delaware.

    But despite this public stance, the NFL knows full well that gambling on its games is what keeps the league both in the public's eye and profitable.

    BS, you say? Read on.

    Some gambling experts believe over a billion dollars is illegally wagered on NFL games alone during its regular season. That number rises during the playoffs.

    Those people betting are also watching the games. In fact, most "fans" need some sort of "action" on the game to "enhance" the enjoyment of it. Be it a friendly wager, a strip card, some squares, an office pool, a parlay card, or a bet with a bookie, people are gambling. How many of you do the same?

    Furthermore, the NFL clearly plays into this gambling habit its fans have. Why do you think the NFL's injury report even exists? It isn't used by opposing coaches to determine the other guy's weaknesses. It was specifically created in the 1950s for gamblers.

    "Inside information" on injuries (much like the info NBA ref Tim Donaghy had access to and used successfully to win over 80% of his wagers) gave an informed bettor a distinct advantage. And during the 50s and 60s, when numerous NFL players were themselves wagering on games or working hand in hand with gamblers who wagered for them, injuries were an important factor on were their money was laid down.

    The NFL's injury report was created to combat this. It continues to exist strictly for gamblers to use.

    The NFL also maintains close contact with members of several Las Vegas sports books to monitor how their games are being bet and if there are any unusual fluctuations in the line. Though it rarely happens today due to the high volume of money bet, in the past games would often be taken off the boards because of suspected "oddities" in the wagers coming in. The thought was, these games were probably fixed.

    And while that fact feeds into why the NFL publicly doesn't want sports gambling legalized, in all likelihood, illegal wagering - the unregulated kind - actually adds to the possibility of game fixing more than legal gambling does. With no one entity montioring these bettors or their bets, no one would know if things were looking "fishy" prior to kickoff.

    Perhaps the most popular form of gambling isn't considered gambling at all by the NFL. And that is fantasy football.

    From personal experience, I have not been in a fantasy football league where money wasn't "awarded" to the league's champion. That, my friends, is gambling. Yet due to the fact that the NFL cannot tell what each and every fantasy league out there is up to, they have plausible deniability against aiding in everyone's gambling...I mean, fantasy league.

    The NFL openly encourages fantasy football. They allow leagues to be run on their own website. And I cannot believe they do not realize money is on the line in most, if not all, of those leagues. Yet at the same time, the NFL knows that fantasy football has aided in the league's popularity and in turn upped ratings and thus its profit.

    So while the league takes an anti-gambling stance on every occasion, this is nothing but good PR. The truth is, the history and success of the NFL is tied directly to both the rise of gambling (especially the advent of the betting line) and television. In fact, all of sports television's rise to prominence is linked to gambling. (For those interested, these links will be further explained in my book. See my author page for more.)

    The NFL realizes an active gambler is an avid watcher. And that is what the league craves more than anything. In all probability, if the NFL could figure out a way in which they could run their own sports book, they would take bets on their games without blinking an eye.

    But if the NFL can't profit off of gambling, then they are willing to take the stance against it, simply to appear to want everything on the up-and-up.

    But the league knows the truth all too well: gambling, no matter the form it takes, makes the NFL the sporting powerhouse it is.
     
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  9. bah007

    bah007 Hall of Fame

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    I'd be interested in hearing how Carroll is responsible for Bush taking money from an agent?
     
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  10. cuppacoffee

    cuppacoffee Resident Grouch

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    Carroll wasn't responsible for Bush taking money. He was responsible for not investigating /reporting it and letting Bush continue to play.

    Do you honestly think that Carroll didn't notice what was going on? Pete Carroll isn't that stupid. He knew.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/usc-...w-rimsand-the-car-alarmand-the-audio-system-3

    The USC athletic dept., of which Carroll was a part, was corrupt at that point in time.


    :coffee:
     


  11. thunderkyss

    thunderkyss MVP

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    NFLN's ticker just scrolled that Byron Leftwich has been signed as Arizona's new QB coach.
     
  12. Texian

    Texian Hall of Fame

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  13. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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    Watching the Pro Bowl.
    Man, old man Drew Brees, at 38 yrs old, can still wing it
    Dude has FIVE 5,000-yd passing seasons. Nobody else has more than one.
     
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  14. Texian

    Texian Hall of Fame

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  15. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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  16. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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    Bridgewater might miss entire 2017 season
    LINK

    Minnesota Vikings quarterback Teddy Bridgewater’s gruesome knee injury that he suffered just prior to the 2016 season is so severe that it could keep him from seeing the field until 2018.

    According to Jason Cole of Bleacher Report, doctors informed the Vikings that the recovery time for an injury as severe as Bridgewater’s would take at least 19 months. Bridgewater suffered a tibiofemoral dislocation and ruptured ACL, which requires extensive rehabilitation.​

    Heard this on Mike & Mike this morning. I have to wonder if the Vikes knew this when Bridgewater first went down. If so, it makes that Bradford trade make much more sense.
     
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  17. Wolf

    Wolf 100% Texan

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    Per sports app..raiders and pats will be in mexico city next season
     
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  18. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    NFL will bethinking of reducing game commercials from 5 TV timeout commercials per quarter to 4. That's still alot of commercials since we're foreced to sit through an umteenth number commercials during team timeouts, injuries, replay reviews, etc.
     
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  19. Showtime100

    Showtime100 Got JJ?

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    That's no sheot. Funny, Sometimes on Thursday and Sunday nights I would forget which channel to turn on for the game. The first channel I hit that has a commercial on I drop the remote without even looking to see if I'm right. Works everytime..lol.
     
  20. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Unfortunately, looks like my suspicions right after his injury was reported has come to be well-founded.

     
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