LORK's 2009 Texans Draft Analysis

Discussion in 'Texans Talk' started by LORK 88, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. LORK 88

    LORK 88 Wreck'em Ŧech!

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,205
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    Texas Tech
    BRIAN CUSHING, LB, USC
    In round 1, Houston went with conventional wisdom and selected Brian Cushing. It was no secret that a strongside linebacker and they got who they coveted at a reasonable pick. Frank Bush was quoted as admitting that he was the guy ever since he watched him early in this season and throughout the combine. We wanted to add intensity and Cushing fits in perfectly. Cushing style of play is intense and he loves fitting the role as an enforcer and brings a gladiator mentality to the field. He doesn’t want to hit you, he wants to bring the pain and make you regret trying to get by him. He was actually quoted in the recent Sports Illustrated issue by saying he want the tight end at the end of the game to hate him more than he hates the TE. Lucky for us he’s also very instinctive and smart when on the field. He’s got a great worth ethic and has a good sense of what it takes to be successful. On the downside however, durability is a concern. He has a list of injuries (knee, shoulder, hamstring) that raise concerns, especially going into a group that already has concerns with several of the linebackers. There are also some instances when Cushing tends to get too aggressive. Overall, Cushing was a solid pick and the right pick. He will help our defense immediately and fits in with new defensive coordinator Frank Bush wants to do with our defense.

    VALUE: At pick 15, Cushing was a good value. There wasn’t too much of a threat of him going that much earlier outside of Washington or New Orleans, but at the same time I don’t think he would have slipped much further than around pick 20 or so. There weren’t too many other options at the pick so it made perfect sense from a value standpoint.

    NEED: There was a definite need at SLB and it could be argued that it was our most pressing need entering the draft. There really weren’t too many other positions that were looking enticing at this point in the draft, and it’s hard to say if trading down was available. We definitely were able to solve one of our biggest holes on the team with this pick.

    INITIAL PLAN: Right off the bat I expect Cushing to start on the strong side. Kubiak and Smith have been quoted as saying they draft their first round picks with the expectation that they can come in right away and start. Diles will now be our fourth linebacker with Bentley as backup MLB and Cato June/Xavier Adibi on the weak side. With that said, Kubiak and Smith have both come out and stated that they feel Cushing is a three down player with DeMeco Ryans. Like Ryans did his rookie year, I expect Cushing to stay on the field on defense in most situations.

    GRADE: A



    CONNOR BARWIN, DE, CINCINNATI
    Round 2 was more of a surprise pick for Houston. Some were expecting to go with a defensive back, but Houston took the one year surprise Connor Barwin from Cincinnati. What’s more interesting is he hasn’t taken a traditional route his college career. He began playing tight end as well as basketball before switching over to defensive end as a senior. He was incredibly productive and showed his natural athleticism all season long. In fact, you could say he got by his senior season on talent and athleticism. Then again, being 6’4” 256 while running a 4.5 40 and jumping 40 inches sure helps. Add in a non-stop motor with good instincts and you’ve got the tools to build a talented player. It also doesn’t hurt that he’s versatile and could play LB in a pinch. However, Barwin does have negatives like every other player, the most obvious being experience. He did a amazing job in his first year, but lack of experience while upping the competition level poses some problems. There are also concerns about his strength and ability to play the run which is why some saw him more as a 3-4 OLB. Overall, adding an athletic player like Barwin allows us to not only help out our pass defense, but gives us more versatility on the defense. The potential is there and we won’t know exactly what we have for a few years, but he has lots of short term value as well as long term.

    VALUE: At pick 46, Barwin was a great value. He was thought to go as high as late round 1 to some of the 3-4 defensive teams, but slipped to Houston. It’s hard to argue with getting another first round player in the second. There were other enticing players out there such as Sean Smith from Utah, but ultimately Houston felt Barwin was the bigger value. His versatility and talent was just too much to pass up here.

    NEED: Personally, I think adding a player who can get to the QB was a huge need. We signed Antonio Smith in the offseason, but he is far from a 10 sack player. Amobi Okoye had a bad year with only one sack and Travis Johnson got his second sack of his four year career last season. Mario Williams was our only constant threat rushing the passer and was responsible for nearly half of Houston’s sacks. Barwin can come in and rush the QB and be a legitimate threat.

    INITIAL PLAN: Barwin was drafted without having a true, definite position. Some saw a TE, others thought 3-4 OLB, and Houston saw a 4-3 DE. He won’t replace starters Antonio Smith or Mario Williams short term, but the consensus on Barwin is that he will be used to rush the passer much like Chicago uses Mark Anderson while sliding Smith inside to DT. On the depth chart, he will be listed behind Mario. With Barwin’s versatility and ability to drop back, we can create some interesting looks where Cushing blitzes and Barwin drops back. Barwin has amazing potential and could develop into a more balanced DE in the future, but for the time being he will be asked to contribute on special teams and rush the passer.

    GRADE: B+



    ANTOINE CALDWELL, OL, ALABAMA
    In round 3, it was almost expected that Houston would draft a running back or defensive back because it made the most sense based on who would be available. However, after Shonn Greene and Glenn Coffee went earlier in the round Houston went with Antoine Caldwell. Caldwell went to Alabama where he had a found a mentor in DeMeco Ryans early on. As with the rest of Houston’s draft picks, Caldwell is extremely versatile and showed it throughout his college career. Caldwell played all over the offensive line starting 34 games at center, 12 at left guard, 1 at right guard, and 1 at right tackle and was a two year captain as well. He’s also a smart graduating in three years and getting 2 degrees in less than four. He shows his smarts on the field when diagnosing plays and his football smarts are top notch. When you look at Caldwell as a football player, he screams zone blocking scheme. Caldwell’s greatest strength as a lineman is his athleticism and quick initial burst. He always explodes off the snap and is swift to get to his assignment. He also has great hands and knows how to use leverage to his advantage despite being well sized at 6’3” 309 lbs. Caldwell is a high motor player as well and is tough. However, Caldwell isn’t very strong at the point of attack which isn’t as huge of a concern as it could be if he was in a man blocking scheme. This does lead to concerns about how he can do against 3-4 nose tackles. His lateral movement has also raised concerns and he can tend to get over-aggressive a times trying to go for the pancake on the move. Overall, Caldwell is a smart player with versatility to match. He’s got great skills and letting Gibbs bring him along will only help.

    VALUE: Houston wanted to get a RB as mentioned above but weren’t going to reach on any one player which is why they went with Caldwell. This was a good spot to pick him at as he was viewed as an early to mid third round pick. When looking at who went after him in round three, nothing was enticing. There was a massive run on wide receivers which Houston has no need for. Overall Caldwell was a smart pick and a good value, especially when you consider the versatility of Caldwell.

    NEED: There was a need at the position, although it’s debatable how big of a need it was and which position was a bigger need; C or RG. Pitts, Brown, and Winston are the starters that won’t be unseated but Myers and Brisiel as the newcomers are more likely to be unseated. Kubiak came out and publicly stated that Caldwell will be a backup and the starting five will remain the same. All five stayed healthy last season which rarely happens and is part of the reason why they went with Caldwell.

    INITIAL PLAN: There’s no real secret as to how Caldwell will be used his first season as a Houston Texan. He will be our backup Center and potentially backup Guard. He’s played multiple positions before and is smart enough to handle the responsibility so it shouldn’t be a problem. I expect him to suit up on Sundays because his versatility allows us suit up fewer linemen. He might play special teams if need be, but I don’t see him starting this season unless someone on the interior gets injured.

    GRADE: B



    GLOVER QUIN, CB, NEW MEXICO
    Glover Quin to me was definitely the first pick that Houston made that had me scratching my head like so many other Texans fans, more so because I had never heard of him before. At New Mexico, Quin teamed up with fellow corner back DeAndre Wright (selected in the 6th round by the Giants) to make up a solid corner back tandem. Glover started three years at New Mexico and now holds the record for most passes broken up all time. As a player, GQ has good numbers and definitely looks the part. He’s 5’11” 205, ran a 4.47 40 yard dash, had a 38” vertical, and benched 225 lbs 22 times. As a corner, Quin is more than willing to come up and help in run defense and likes to pop offensive players when given the chance. Against the pass, he’s very physical and aggressive. He’s great a jamming receivers at the line and getting them off their routes. He’s fairly quick at locating the ball and looks natural when picking off the pass. However, Quin needs to work on taking better angles on deep routes. He tends to take mis-steps and doesn’t have the recovery speed to catch up after being beat. He’s great when he keeps the plays in front of him, but when they get by is when he starts to have troubles. He’s also not quick to react to the QB in zone systems. Overall, Quin is a solid athlete who likes to play cornerback physically. If he’s allowed to play bump and run as a CB, he can do well. However, if he’s asked to turn and run or play zone, he won’t be as well off. Then again, there’s always the possibility he could end up at either safety spot and be better off.

    VALUE: This was probably the pick I had the most problem with. Quin does give value because of his versatility (a reoccurring theme all draft long) but I think that taking him in the fourth round was too early in my opinion. Only 5 corners were taken in between Houston’s first 4th round pick and their 5th round pick, although there had been a huge run at the position in the earlier rounds. Quin does have value, but I just think he was taken too early.

    NEED: Corner back wasn’t as big of a need as safety to me although I consider both needs, but Quin can do both and has that versatility. With Petey Faggins thankfully leaving in free agency and Dunta Robinson’s future with the team up in the air, I don’t have a problem selecting yet another mid-round prospect to the team. There may not be a specific or immediate need at the position, but a corner back was a need and a smart pick from a position stand point.

    INITIAL PLAN: Despite Quin having the ability to play corner and safety, Kubiak and Smith have said that Quin will stay at corner and special teams for the time being. If he struggles he could switch to safety, but for the time being he’ll be given the chance to compete with Antwaun Molden and Fred Bennett for the chance to play nickel corner. Regardless if he wins the competition against his fellow young, mid round selections he will make the final 53 man roster and should suit out unless he falls to 5th on the depth chart.

    GRADE: C
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2009
  2. LORK 88

    LORK 88 Wreck'em Ŧech!

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,205
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    Texas Tech
    ANTHONY HILL, TE, NORTH CAROLINA STATE
    With our second 4th round pick acquired from trading our backup gunslinger Sage Rosenfels, Houston selected TE Anthony Hill from North Carolina State. This was a mild surprise because it’s wasn’t expected that Houston would draft a blocking tight end this early on although it is a need with Mark Bruener retiring. Surprisingly enough, not too much has been mentioned about Hill playing with Mario Williams for two seasons or the fact that Mario is younger by 29 days. More has been mentioned about Hill being from Houston and going to prep school locally before going to NC State. Anyways, when you look at Hill the football player he’s pretty straight forward. Hill’s most dominant feature and the main reason we drafted him. He’s considered to be a third offensive tackle when in the game and was arguably the top blocking tight end in this year’s draft. He can handle individual assignments and can be counted on to get the job done. In fact, Houston’s scouting director was at the Wake Forest game when Hill put fourth overall selection Aaron Curry on his back. As a pass catcher Hill has soft hands and does a good job on short routes. He was used quite a bit on play action and bootleg passes. The negatives on Hill are quite obvious. He’s not an outstanding athlete and won’t stretch the field vertically at all. He’s not a threat in the passing game so it’s fair to label him one dimensional. It’s fair to say that with Anthony Hill what you see is what you get. He’s not much of a threat in the passing game, but Houston drafted him as a blocking tight end.

    VALUE: Surprisingly enough, Hill was projected to go around the 4th, possibly 5th round so there was value in this selection. At this point, a good majority were hoping to go RB or Safety although no more safeties were selected until round 5. However, Andre Brown and Gartrell Johnson were selected later in the round and fit the mold of power running back we wanted. Hill was a good value selection, but there were a few other picks that would have been good value.

    NEED: vSelecting a blocking tight end to replace Bruener was definitely a need. Like stated above, the only other needs Houston had at this point were RB and potentially safety as it hadn’t been declared if the earlier fourth round pick Glover Quin could play safety or corner back. As mentioned above, there were two power backs taken later this round and was the other need at this point in the draft.

    INITIAL PLAN: As if I need to even say it. Hill will be used as a blocking TE and potentially on special teams. I don’t see him being a factor in the passing game as a pass catcher any more than Bruener and Dreessen have been. Seems pretty fitting that he took over Bruener’s old number. I think he could be intriguing down in the goal line though. We love rolling out on the fake and might let Hill slip if they think he’s in there to block.

    GRADE: B-



    JAMES CASEY, TE, RICE
    James Casey was a surprise pick here after taking Anthony Hill and having Owen Daniels. In fact, it was more surprising because Casey is said to be an Owen Daniels clone. However, Casey is an interesting prospect. He was a triple major at Rice and managed a 3.84 during his two years at the school. He also played 7 positions in one college game for Rice. He has the ability to play QB, RB, FB, TE, and LS which only adds to his value and chance of making the team. All this of course was after his time in the minor leagues for baseball. When looking at the positives, they jump out very quickly. Outside of his versatility and smarts, Casey is a great pass catcher. He knows how to get open, catches the ball well in traffic, rarely drops passes, and can make people miss after the catch. As a runner he’s tough and makes quick decisions. Overall he’s tough a hard worker, and just a terrific athlete for his size. While that all may make James Casey an intriguing prospect, no player is without flaws and concerns. One such concern is that he had no true position at the college level. It also is worth noting that Casey played in a spread offense so he wasn’t asked to be in a typical offense. With that goes the question of can he block and does he have the strength to do so? Overall, Casey is an intriguing prospect who has many tools of the trade and offers a lot to the offense. It’s hard not to like Casey who has been put through a lot in his life and has a chance to stay in the city of Houston. His lack of a traditional role hurts him, but he can help the offense in a variety of ways that makes him valuable. Personally this is my favorite pick of the draft.

    VALUE: Casey was a huge value here. Lots of draft experts felt that he was going in the 3rd round so to land him in the 5th is huge. Because he's so versatile and can do so much, his value is worth even more at this point in the draft and is a steal in every sense of the word. At this point in time RB and Safety were still major needs, although no big RBs were picked in this round. As for safety, there also weren't too many options for this spot outside of the Clemson safeties Michael Hamlin and Chris Clemons. Overall, Casey was a great pick from a value standpoint.

    NEED: While James Casey was an amazing value pick, he was on the opposite end of the spectrum when it came to need. Not only does James Casey fit the same mold as Owen Daniels at the tight end position, but we also took a tight end in the fourth round with Anthony Hill albeit as a blocking tight end. However, adding Casey’s versatility doesn’t hurt in the need area because he can fit into so many roles with the team. He wasn’t a need for Houston at all at this point, but his versatility is a welcomed addition because he fits in so many roles on offense.

    INITIAL PLAN: It's really hard to say what the plan for Casey is because he can do so much and we have plenty of options. His rookie season I see him as a TE, backup FB, and special teams player. His production scoring in college could also let him see more of a red zone role as Houston struggled to get into the end zone. He might spread out wide in some instances, but I see him starting off in those roles and getting more expansive duties as he proves he can be counted on. He could be the QB in a wildcat formation if we choose to add that wrinkle or could also get looks as a goal line RB. I also wouldn't discount his ability to long snap. The options for Casey are almost endless as he can play any position on offense other than the O Line because of his resourcefulness.

    OVERALL GRADE: B+



    BRICE MCCAIN, CB/KR, UTAH
    Brice, better known as “that one guy across from Sean Smith” was our selection in the 6th round. I wasn’t too aware of him either like Glover Quin, but quickly saw why he was our pick at the spot. McCain kept quiet during the offseason despite being a making first and second team MWC his senior and junior seasons and starting for three seasons. He wasn’t invited to the combine and wasn’t expected to get drafted. Then he ran a 4.33 at his pro day and his stock took off. You would have figured Oakland would of taken a look with that speed! After that pro day, he earned several individual workouts including one with the Texans. From a measurables standpoint, McCain isn’t very big at 5’9” 185. However, his speed is killer. His 40 time, 10 yard split, 20 yard split, 20 yard shuttle, and 3 cone drill times would of put him in the top 10 in all of those categories. When watching him on what little film is available he can run with anyone and then kick it up a notch. Rarely will he not be the fastest player on the field. As a cornerback, McCain is great at turning and running with players. He’s got the speed and quickness that let him close quickly and not get beat deep. Despite his size, McCain also can be feisty and has a scrapper mentality. However, his size gets him in trouble against bigger defenders and can’t win the battle for position. His lack of strength doesn’t help too much either. He also doesn’t have the greatest hands as evident by his high number of pass breakups and low number of interceptions. As a tackler, he isn’t anything special although he is a willing tackler. What McCain additionally offers that helps his chance to make the team is his kick returning abilities. For a guy with such great speed, he’s patient until he makes a decision and just takes off. He didn’t always return kicks, but has quite a bit when at Utah and it’s an added benefit. Overall, McCain is a scrapper who’s got blazing speed and is great at turning and running with players. He lacks size, but has the true cornerback mentality.

    VALUE: This late into the draft, it’s really hard to argue who is a great value addition and who isn’t. He was projected to go any where from the 5th round to being an undrafted free agent. What you look for in late round picks is for players who can challenge for a spot on the team, and that’s exactly what McCain brings. His return abilities will be a nice addition as there are some questions being raised about Andre Davis’ and Jacoby Jones’ value to the team. I also would rule out the possibility of him being a gunner on special teams. It really is tough deciding if a late round pick is a good value, but I feel McCain is at this point.

    NEED: At this point, we really didn’t have a need for McCain. His versatility helps and will challenge at training camp, but we already drafted a cornerback two rounds earlier who you would assume has the inside track to make the team over Brice. However, the only real needs at this point were a power RB and potentially a safety. The only tempting player to take at either position was James Davis so the lack of need can be overlooked a bit.

    INITIAL PLAN: McCain faces an uphill battle. He’s going to be battling 7 other players for a position that will only have 5 on the final roster including the two incumbent starters and three players drafted in mid rounds from the past three drafts. His ability to come in right away will be huge as will his special teams ability. I honestly don’t see McCain on the active roster unless someone gets injured. He’s talented, but I don’t see us carrying 6 players at corner unless we’re afraid he will get picked up if he goes on the practice squad.

    GRADE: C+



    TROY NOLAN, S, ARIZONA STATE
    Let’s be honest, at this point we were all desperate for a RB, especially with Rashad Jennings still on the board. Instead we went with a safety (finally). Like many late round picks, Troy Nolan wasn’t a name I recognized right away so I had to do more research. The first thing that jumped out at me was his goofy smile. The next was that Glover Quin looked more like a safety from a physical standpoint than Nolan. Then I saw his production at Arizona State and it jumped out at me. He only played and started two years because he was a JUCO transfer, but he made the most of his time. Not only did he have 10 interceptions in that time, but he returned five of them for touchdowns. I watched film on half of them and while some were being at the right place at the right time, the rest were Nolan positioning himself well which is the first positive about him; Nolan is a playmaker. He’s got real soft hands and will almost always make the catch if he gets his hands on the ball. He also is smart in coverage and can bait QBs while he times his break. As a run defender he likes to be aggressive and deliver hits. Despite being aggressive, he is dependable in this area. However, he can tend to get a bit too aggressive and overrun plays. He also doesn’t have the greatest speed and tends to put himself out of position. He’ll need to prove that he’s athletic and fast enough to be a free safety at the next level. Overall, this pick reminds me a lot of Zac Diles two years ago. Like Nolan, Diles was a JUCO transfer who was productive in his short time but was questioned if he was athletic and fast enough for the next level. He didn’t play a big role his first year but was able to contribute in year two which is a path Nolan can follow if he can pick up the system and prove that he can play the position and show his athleticism.

    VALUE: Like I said before, value in the late rounds is hard to judge. However, landing a productive two year starter from a major conference is a nice addition and a solid value. He surprising doesn’t offer the versatility that the other picks do, but he fits more of a true position and has a nice skill set to work with.

    NEED: Safety was definitely a need. With four safeties on the roster before drafting Nolan, we needed to add competition as none of the backups were standouts. We also still needed a power RB, but landing a free safety is a nice addition in the final round.

    INITIAL PLAN: It’s up to Nolan if he makes the team or not. As of right now we have five safeties on the roster and will most likely go up against Brandon Harrison to battle for the backup free safety spot. Nolan is more of a traditional free safety and brings more in pass defense so I feel he has the inside track. However, Nolan will have to prove that he can step in right away if need be and that he can contribute on special teams. If he can prove those two things he should make the final roster, although it’s debatable if he suits out since Nick Ferguson can play both safety spots. If he doesn’t make the final cut, I fully expect him to be on the practice squad.

    GRADE: B



    OVERALL INITIAL SUMMARY
    Overall, the Texans added a lot of talent this weekend despite not trading up or down at all. They really went for value and didn't reach at all except for Glover Quin in my opinion. The reoccurring theme throughout all the picks happens to be versatility, toughness, and leadership. We also showed that we were most concerned with defense and improving our pass defense. The best pick to me was Brian Cushing. He's a top talent, is very business-like in his approach, and will add a lot of aggressiveness to our defense. Glover Quin was my least favorite pick because I felt it wasn't the highest need and wasn't a huge value at this point. Casey was my favorite because the possibilities are endless with him. Giving Kubiak and Shanahan a weapon like Casey can be fun. The only thing I wish Houston would have done is add a power running back through the draft. We did pick up Arain Foster as a UDFA, but I don't see any immediate or long term solutions on the roster right now. Overall, It was a solid draft from top to bottom where we added both starters and role players.

    INITIAL OVERALL GRADE: B+
     
  3. LORK 88

    LORK 88 Wreck'em Ŧech!

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,205
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    Texas Tech
    This took me forever to write and I'd imagine that not too many people will read it all. Thanks to those that do and thanks to those that even skim over it. The 2009 draft thread was closed so figured this was the best spot for it.
     
  4. Farough

    Farough Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    850
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Great Read, Lork. I like your assessments on the draft.
     
  5. mexican_texan

    mexican_texan Furry Tractors

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    14,192
    Likes Received:
    515
    Location:
    Spring, TX
    We miss you around here Lork. You should stop by more often.
     
  6. Killer Bee

    Killer Bee Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Abilene Tx
    Wow Lork, thanks for the hard work. Best Texans post draft write-up I've seen.

    Here’s another interesting side note on Barwin. Although inexperienced at DE, he says that previously playing TE helped him adapt quickly because of his offensive blocking mindset. He also has a veteran ability to sniff out screens. Something we've struggled with.
     
  7. AnthonyE

    AnthonyE Lurker

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Messages:
    2,203
    Likes Received:
    175
    Location:
    Huntsville/Houston
    Awesome analysis, Lork. It was a great read and I agreed with pretty much all of it. Very fair judgements, imo.

    Also, you have a great custom title. lol
     
  8. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2007
    Messages:
    18,671
    Likes Received:
    1,186
    Location:
    League City, Tx
    Good write up. I think that over time, the Caldwell pick will get bumped up to an A, once he takes over for either Myers or Briesel. DeMeco is already pumped about having his former teammate on our team. That's good enough for me.

    I wonder how many of these guys will end up on the practice squad and how many (other than Cushing and Barwin) will be among the Sept. 53?
     


  9. Malloy

    Malloy Site Contributor

    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Messages:
    5,669
    Likes Received:
    226
    Location:
    CPH
    Good read, thanks for taking the time!
     
  10. Ckw

    Ckw Guest

    Excellent write up man. I enjoyed that. Took a little while but it was well worth it.
     
  11. infantrycak

    infantrycak Mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2004
    Messages:
    55,669
    Likes Received:
    2,704
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Nice work and thanks for the research. One thing I will note:

    "We" in that sentence must refer to some fans as obviously there were some fans who didn't think power running back was the way to go and obviously the Texans didn't think those guys fit the mold they wanted.
     
  12. whiskeyrbl

    whiskeyrbl Guest

    Wow. Thanks for putting in the time and effort on something worth reading. I like and agree with most of your views. I think we are a better team now. Rep coming your way. Good job.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2009
  13. Texsker

    Texsker Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2008
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    47
    Location:
    Austin, Tex.
    Great post, LORK! Very thorough review of the draft class.

    Only one correction -- defensive backs don't do bench reps at 225 at the combine. DBs and other similar positions do reps at 185. I believe that only offensive and defensive linemen do reps at 225.

    Thanks again for taking the time to do this write-up!
     
    thunderkyss likes this.
  14. rmartin65

    rmartin65 I'm Score

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    7,999
    Likes Received:
    447
    Great write up. Very nice job.
     
  15. drewmar74

    drewmar74 disgruntled

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,841
    Likes Received:
    327
    Location:
    Bayou Country
    QFT, Lork. A great read - I freakin' devoured it!

    +Rep
     
  16. Brando

    Brando Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    6,573
    Likes Received:
    571
    Nice work Lork.:texflag:
     
  17. bckey

    bckey Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    2,335
    Likes Received:
    151
    Thanks for the great write up Lork! Repped.
     
  18. sbalderrama

    sbalderrama Guest

    Here's the part I don't get with alot of the draft commentaries. Houston obviously had Quin rated higher than the other players behind him, including CB's. Chances are good he would have been selected before their next pick at 5, presuming at least some other teams rated him the same way. So would you rather have waited to round 5 and gotten some other CB that you didn't like as well, just to match up with some mythological draft value rating that in actuality nobody can judge until about 3 years from now? Its like Duane Brown last year.... people would rather have skipped Brown and gotten someone lower on the list, than "reach" for Brown. In then end it's about finding good players, not winning some mathematical draft value contest.
     
  19. Insideop

    Insideop Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,823
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    In the "Control Room"
    Where did you hear this? The only weight I've ever seen/heard that they use in the BP is 225 lbs., and that's for all the participants in the Combine or at the Pro-Days. That's why most DB's and WR's only do around 10 to 15 reps, and the Linemen usually can do 20 to 40 reps. :kingkong:

    By the way, are you a retired American living in the Philippines or were you born and raised there?
     
  20. bah007

    bah007 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2006
    Messages:
    9,529
    Likes Received:
    495
    Location:
    Spring, TX
    Not at the combine. Everybody does the big boy weight there.
     

Share This Page