Injury Thread

Discussion in 'Texans Talk' started by CloakNNNdagger, Jul 31, 2016.

  1. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    31,087
    Likes Received:
    17,598
    Any collision would put him at risk for neck or concussion injuries.............but as a returner, the high speed collisions with both parties at full run,are more common..........and many times delivered by several "projectiles" and from different angles.
     
    CWTexansFan and badboy like this.
  2. steelbtexan

    steelbtexan Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Messages:
    32,379
    Likes Received:
    11,897
    Not so much in God'ells NFL.
     
  3. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    31,087
    Likes Received:
    17,598
    [WILL DUPLICATE THIS POST HERE AS A RESPONSE TO A QUESTION IN THE OTA THREAD.........FOR EASY RETRIEVAL PURPOSES]

    I've written extensively re. Fuller's and Coutee's injuries in the Injury Thread. But to give a relatively quick answer:
    Even if I were a gambler, I could not give specific odds for either making it through the whole season. However, relying alone on them to do so would not be the best strategy.

    Fuller has had recurrent hamstring and knee problems since his rookie year.............studies has demonstrated that hamstring injuries increase the risk of ACL injuries, and ACL injuries increase the risk of hamstring injuries. So also consider Fuller a high risk for lower extremity injuries:

    Oct 25, 2018 ACL Tear Grade 3 Fuller tore his right ACL

    Aug 15, 2018 Hamstring Strain Grade 2 Fuller "tweaked" a hamstring in an August practice. He sat out the whole preseason (coming off January knee surgery) and missed the regular-season opener.

    Dec 31, 2017 Knee Strain Grade 1 ..................He had "minor" surgery shortly thereafter.

    Nov 12, 2017 Chest Rib Fracture left Week 10 and missed the next 3 games with cracked ribs.

    Aug 2, 2017 Clavicle Fracture missed the entire preseason and 1st 3 games of the regular season.

    Oct 30, 2016 Knee Strain Grade 1 left Week 8 with an unspecified left knee injury that cost him the game after the Week 9 bye.

    Oct 11, 2016 NFL Hamstring Sprain/Pull Unspecified Grade 1 missed 1 game because of a setback with his hamstring injury.

    Sep 7, 2016 Hamstring Sprain/Pull Unspecified Grade 1 popped up on the injury report leading up to Week 1 but played through his hamstring issue.


    Coutee, with his multiple significant hamstring tears last season, will be considered a high risk for recurrent hamstring problems this season...........moreso, if the staff has missed an underlying functional trigger, be it anatomical or training related. As I wrote above re. Fuller, his history of hamstrings will place him at increased risk this season for other lower extremity injuries as well.
     
  4. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    31,087
    Likes Received:
    17,598
    Henderson walked off the field on his own accompanied by the trainer early in practice.
     
  5. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    31,087
    Likes Received:
    17,598
    Sarah Barshop‏@sarahbarshop
    Here’s a look at the new cooling system the Texans installed on the practice field. It can hold 30-35 players and can quickly cool a player’s core body temperature. Other teams who play in hot climates have used them.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    11:02 AM - 29 May 2019
     
  6. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    31,087
    Likes Received:
    17,598
    Good new!
    Henderson left practice early but Bill O'Brien said it was because he had to take a mandatory drug test.
     
  7. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    31,087
    Likes Received:
    17,598
    Heat is usually associated with muscle cramping. However, some athletes are sensitive to cold. Especially with this steep drop in temp so quickly, this could create its own muscle issues if it's used during practices or games, not after them.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2019
    CWTexansFan likes this.
  8. thunderkyss

    thunderkyss MVP

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Messages:
    50,596
    Likes Received:
    13,829
    Location:
    Texas
    Also seems like it ruins any of the bodies natural acclimatization. Takes away any home field advantage we may have had
     
    CWTexansFan likes this.
  9. heymak

    heymak Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    86
    Looks like an owners box for practice.
     
  10. steelbtexan

    steelbtexan Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Messages:
    32,379
    Likes Received:
    11,897
    Did he pass this test?
     


  11. steelbtexan

    steelbtexan Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Messages:
    32,379
    Likes Received:
    11,897
    delete
     
    thunderkyss likes this.
  12. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Myopicone

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2016
    Messages:
    539
    Likes Received:
    763
    Location:
    Fulshear TX
    I would have sweat all my wizz out by end of practice down here, sorry no sample for you!
     
    OptimisticTexan likes this.
  13. thunderkyss

    thunderkyss MVP

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Messages:
    50,596
    Likes Received:
    13,829
    Location:
    Texas
    Do they have the opposite contraption in Green Bay to keep those sissies warm in the winter?
     
  14. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    31,087
    Likes Received:
    17,598
    No hot room counterpart, but...........................

    Seven ways NFL players keep from freezing
    Sometimes cold-weather gear doesn't quite cut it, and NFL players need to do a little extra. Photo by Scott Winters/Icon Sportswire
    Dec 31, 2017
    • Matt BowenESPN Staff Writer

    Editor's note: Temperatures in the Northeast on Sunday are hovering in the single digits -- with wind chills falling much lower than that. With that in mind, we take a look at what players need to do to handle the cold, a story that originally ran in advance of the NFC wild-card game between the Seattle Seahawks and Minnesota Vikings during the 2015 playoffs.

    After playing my college ball in Iowa City, Iowa, with NFL stops in Green Bay, Washington and Buffalo, I've seen some brutal weather on the field. Snow, wind, ice -- you name it. And the hits sting in the cold. That stuff hurts. On top of getting past the mental block that it's going to be freezing on the field, how can NFL players prep for the unwelcome conditions?

    Given the advanced uniform technology of cold-weather gear, players today have an advantage in keeping up their core temperatures, but there still are situations when they have to lean on some old-school tricks to avoid a miserable experience on the field.

    Here are seven ways players can stay somewhat warm -- and still produce -- when the temperatures start to drop toward zero degrees.

    Bring out Vaseline
    A jar of Vaseline is an old trick from veteran players to block out the wind. Want to look tough and avoid wearing sleeves? Rub Vaseline all over your arms and slap some on your face. It sounds kind of ridiculous, but I used Vaseline in Green Bay from Thanksgiving through the playoffs when the temperatures would fall. Players want to show off their arms on a national stage in the playoffs, but to avoid shaking from the cold, you need to cover up with Vaseline. It's slimy and it takes some time to scrub off after the game, but it sure does work. And it's much easier than wearing a ski mask under your helmet.

    Hot chocolate and chicken broth
    Drink hot chocolate while you are getting dressed for the game and refuel on the sideline with some chicken broth. It's a great way to keep your body temperature up. But you can't just pound that stuff. No one wants to drink five cups of hot chocolate and then run down on the opening kickoff. That's trouble, and it also leads to vomit all over the field. Yes, you have to continue to hydrate during cold-weather games (I once cramped up during a game in Buffalo), so Gatorade, Pedialyte and water are a must before and during the game. A cup of hot chocolate in the locker room and a cup of chicken broth while you get a break on the sideline, however, is a smart way to stay warm.

    Layers -- you need layers
    Even with the advanced cold-weather gear, players need to add more layers to keep their core warm. In Green Bay, the equipment room was stocked with fleece turtlenecks. They're warm as heck, and they even come sleeveless for the guys who want to show off their biceps. Check out Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers. He still wears the same fleece turtlenecks that were around in Green Bay back in the early 2000s when I played. You won't see many players wearing hoodies under their jerseys like they do in practice, so the fleece turtleneck is a smart play, along with a pair of long underwear. I know the cold-gear leggings work, but adding another layer on top of those (under game socks) can keep your hamstrings warm when you have to chase down the deep ball. Now, you don't want to look like the kid from "A Christmas Story" stuffed into his snowsuit, but having more layers is always a good idea.

    Hand warmers can be used for anything
    Those instant hand warmers we buy at gas stations are all over NFL locker rooms and sidelines during cold-weather games -- and players will put them everywhere. Among the many ways they are used: Drop a couple inside your hand muff, tape them to the top of your feet (before putting on cleats), put them in your gloves and tape them inside the ear hole of the helmet. Back before players were required to wear leg pads, I saw guys put them in the thigh board slot of the game pants. They don't last an entire game, so you have to keep grabbing new ones, but they provide a little relief.

    Be careful with sideline heaters
    On Sunday in the Packers-Bears game, we will see guys draped in heavy sideline jackets and huddled around heaters on the sidelines. They are the best. Like jet engines. And it's a good idea to stand in front of those before taking the field, especially for special teams (limited reps lead to tight hamstrings in the cold). However, those things are dangerous. I mean, it's an open flame. I've seen sideline jackets catch on fire, and I also remember a situation in Green Bay when it was time for the punt return team to get on the field in a late December game but a player couldn't make it on the field because his gloves had melted together. Panic set in, and trainers frantically tried to cut off his gloves.

    Double up on the gloves, socks
    Cold-weather gloves have more padding and are thicker than the standard gloves we see wide receivers, running backs and defensive backs wear. But they still aren't warm enough, in my opinion. And no one wants to play the game with numb fingers. The solution? Put some thin, cloth gloves (like little kids wear) under game-issued gloves. It's not much (and that's why guys use hand warmers, too), but it's better than trying to catch the ball with no feeling in your fingers. The same goes for your feet. Many people know how nasty it can get when you lose feeling in your toes while shoveling the driveway. Now, imagine trying to run on a football field -- in the playoffs. Take a thin pair of thermal socks and put those on underneath the game-issued socks.

    Use heated benches, helmet warmers
    Don't stand around when you get a break. Those sideline jackets are nice, along with a team-issued stocking cap, but the heated benches are sweet. They instantly warm you up and have slots for your feet. Sure, when you stand up to go back on offense or defense, the cold is going to hit you right in the face. But at least you can stay warm until then. The same goes for helmet warmers. These are attached to the back of the heated benches (long, white poles) and are a must for any player. Putting on an ice-cold helmet is terrible -- those pads inside freeze instantly in the cold, and your helmet turns into a brick. Good luck squeezing that thing on while avoiding the possibility that your ears might rip off your dome. Oh man, that hurts. Sit your butt down on those heated benches and warm up that helmet. That's key to playing in the cold.
     
    DocBar and CWTexansFan like this.
  15. DocBar

    DocBar Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Messages:
    14,358
    Likes Received:
    4,849
    Location:
    I'm international
    We used Vaseline and pantyhose under our "official" cold weather gear when I was stationed in Germany. Worked great when it was cold. The hardest part was keeping our feet dry. That was just about impossible.
     
  16. IDEXAN

    IDEXAN Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    13,744
    Likes Received:
    2,404
    Location:
    Houston
    In past summers when attending Texans' practices as a fan sure could have used one of those contraptions a couple times in those blazing August days
    in Houston.
     
  17. BOBdaFRAUD

    BOBdaFRAUD Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2018
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    124

    Wahahahaha the question is did he use a prosthetic penis ala Lamar Odom
     
  18. IDEXAN

    IDEXAN Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    13,744
    Likes Received:
    2,404
    Location:
    Houston
    Houston Texans running back D'Onta Foremancould be in line for a breakout year after missing most of the 2018NFLseason while recovering from a torn Achilles suffered in November 2017.

    On Tuesday, Texans running backs coach Danny Barrett said Foreman will head into training camp in a much better place after opening last season on the physically unable to perform (PUP) list.

    "He's light-years ahead of where he was last year at this time, coming off the injury and everything," Barretttold reporters. "I still think he’s continuing to work hard. I think he’s had a good offseason to date. The time away from here, I thought was well spent for himself. Getting ready to go physically, and I think mentally, right now, is what I look at is each and every day."
    ***
    https://bleacherreport.com/articles...-years-ahead-in-2017-achilles-injury-recovery
    ***
    I dunno but what do you think C&D, do you find this encouraging or is this just so much wishful thinking ?
     
    CWTexansFan likes this.
  19. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Myopicone

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2016
    Messages:
    539
    Likes Received:
    763
    Location:
    Fulshear TX
    Until he is pushing heavy men after contact, I don't think we will know, but all the hype is pointing to he did his work plus some to be ready, stronger and quicker. He looked pretty bad end of last year, so he has to be better than that and seems to have done what it takes, now up to his body and to see if he is one of those that gets on and does not have compensatory injuries
     
    CWTexansFan and HaveMercy like this.
  20. HaveMercy

    HaveMercy Passing Through

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2017
    Messages:
    454
    Likes Received:
    646
    Location:
    Katy...Age 68
    If we could transplant Arian Foster's vision, anticipation, and instincts into DForeman, it would more than make up for slightly downgraded physical skills.
     

Share This Page