Injury Thread

Discussion in 'Texans Talk' started by CloakNNNdagger, Jul 31, 2016.

  1. badboy

    badboy Site Contributor

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    Doc, my understanding of Foreman and IIRC he is a build up speed with no powerful push off or change of direction guy. Even his first few steps in a run play doesn't seem to require much. Perhaps if he is a blocker that must cross some yardage to get to a rusher it might be different. Do you agree? As a runner he just seemed in college to go forward and hit hole and break tackles. In the latter is where I expect him to stress his achilles.
     
  2. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Foreman is not close to a light weight. It takes a heavy locomotive a lot of force to start the heavy load before if begins chugging along. You don't SEE the initial force............you just see the ultimate speed. When faced with strong defenders with the need to break tackles is another scenario where the Achilles is placed on great stress.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
  3. steelbtexan

    steelbtexan Hall of Fame

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    The Texans counting on a RB coming back from an Achilles injury would be very Texans like.
    #DDW
     
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  4. 281Texan

    281Texan Veteran

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    Time will tell. I’m just happy to see what he’s able to do thus far. I like that he’s looking quick and is able to begin working on his craft. Some guys have made it out OK from this kind of injury while others clearly lose a step. I know the pads aren’t on, but it’s still encouraging. I’m pulling for him to eventually become the lead back
     
  5. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Myopicone

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    Pats seem to trust DT coming off a achilles. Cheap contract, but heh, much older dude. Staying hopeful, still want another RB, but dont think we need to make it a day 1/2 pick. Foreman has everything to prove this year, I like those situations
     
  6. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    The implications of Thomas' Achilles is not the same as a running back's. Even so, if indeed he is destined to return to decent performance, it is unlikely that it will occur before the second year post surgery.
     
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  7. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Gaine relates that Fuller is on track to playing Week 1. He has supposedly had no setbacks thus far.
     
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  8. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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  9. cuppacoffee

    cuppacoffee Resident Grouch

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    Myself and several others I am sure will continue to worry until he gets the unofficial TT doctors approval. :)

    I began worrying last year when you questioned Foreman's effort at rehab.

    :coffee:
     
  10. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    In order to try to better understand the Texans' reluctance to give Clowney a long-term contract with high guaranteed monies, it's important to understand the natural history of patients having undergone microfracture surgery on the knees............While reading this, keep in mind that in December Clowney will be 5 years post his microfracture procedure.

    Despite the popularity, there is increasing evidence that also questions the value of microfracture in knees. Recent orthopedic reviews report that the long-term clinical results of microfracture are no better than those for patients who do not have microfracture, and that microfracture is not without risks

    Orthopedists Goyal et al. reviewed all Level I and Level II studies (these are studies with the greatest confirmed validity) in the world medical literature and concluded that in the short-term, for young patients with small lesion sizes and low post-operative demands, microfracture was associated with good clinical outcomes. However ‘ beyond 5 years post-operatively, treatment failure after microfracture could be expected regardless of lesion size ’.

    Another study has highlighted the risks associated with microfracture; that disruption of the subchondral plate (a support layer) upon drilling into the marrow predisposes the bone to the development of subchondral cysts and fragile or brittle bone, subsequently accelerating osteoarthritis.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2019


  11. JB

    JB Old Curmudgeon

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    How old are these reports? Have advancements in medicine changed things?
     
  12. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    2016.............and microfracture is microfracture. It's a simple procedure that has itself essentially not changed since when first performed in 1959. And in Clowney's case, don't forget that originally torn meniscus was removed, not repaired. Deficiency of protective stabilizing meniscus is not addressed by microfracture surgery.
     
  13. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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    So the literature indicates microFracture is a temporary patch, not a permanent fix.
    You've probably said this before (many times) but it's just now sinking in.
     
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  14. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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    See this I don't understand. Instead of drilling holes why not insert an inert (Teflon?), artificial lattice thingee. A Teflon-based lattice between the two rubbing surfaces would provide more surface area for the cartiliage repairing mechanism to work with.
    Unchanged after 60 yrs?!
    What am I missing, Doc?
     
  15. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    I'm not able to picture what you are proposing enough to comment on. Is the lattice floating between the apposing joint surfaces or attached, and how would it allow more cartilage repair?
     
  16. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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    between the opposing (sliding) surfaces....

    Is the reason for drilling those holes to provide places for the cartilage repair mechanism to operate? If so why wouldn't placing a teflon lattice (thickness??) instead of drilling those holes work better and provide some cushion while healing takes place.
    [​IMG]
    If I'm off base say so.

    ...it's probably bad business for an engineer to try and solve a medical issue anyway
     
  17. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    A lattice of any sort cannot be completely smooth, and any rough surface would not allow the joint to function properly without further damage. In addition, secure attachment of a lattice that could not be displaced with joint movement would be be a big problem. "Healing" could not occur without drilling into the marrow, as the remaining outer bone with no cartilage cover has no true blood supply to regenerate even psuedocartilage. This is not to even mention the potential high risk of a fenestrated foreign body lattice. And if you used the lattice after performing classic microfracture, the psuedocartilage would be discontinuous and would then grow over the lattice no longer giving continuous nourishment (poor as it is anyway) from a solid base of underlying marrow . This would encourage the pseudocartilage to slide off and/or grind away from any underlying lattice work during joint function (as the teflon lattice, due to the type of metal material that it is, could never be expected to truly integrate with the pseudo cartilage.

    I've probably totally confused you at this point.
     
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  18. gafftop

    gafftop Hall of Fame

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    What does it matter. Fuller will get hurt again no doubt. That Gaine is stating makes me think they are counting on him. Some people/teams never learn.
     
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  19. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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    The only confusing part is why metal works in dental applications and hip replacements but wouldn't "fully integrate" in this application. But then lubricating sliding and load-bearing surfaces is a b!tch even when its not the human body so part of me get that. And I picked Teflon because its a fairly inert polymer, not strictly a metal like titanium or stainless.
    ...it was just a random thought.
     
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  20. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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