Craig Fitzgerald brings long-needed new S & C philosophy

Discussion in 'Texans Talk' started by CloakNNNdagger, Feb 6, 2014.

  1. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    "Changes, they are a'comin'" The weight machines are likely to be coat hangers for the equally as successful Texans varsity jackets. Fitzgerald and his staff' specific goal will be to grow them bigger, faster, and stronger. With this new philosophy, hopefully we will see a trend to lesser injuries. When concrete meets balsa wood, concrete usually wins. It'll be nice for our players to drop their usual role of the weak and fragile balsa wood, and take on the properties of a non-yielding concrete wall.


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    Here is a look into Fitzgerald's competitive Olympic-based training philosophy in his own words VIDEO:

    MEET CRAIG FITZGERALD (HIS PHILOSOPHY)

    "Impressive" is a word that comes to mind.:texflag:
     
  2. thunderkyss

    thunderkyss Salem Poor

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    What was the old philosophy? Smaller, weaker, & slower?


    That's not HIT at all. HIT is about working the muscle to failure in 1 set (8 to 10 reps) & it's usually a full body workout... if you're using the Darden method, he stresses resting to allow the muscle to grow. 1 workout a week (again, working every muscle to failure) would be too much for an adult male.
     
  3. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    No..........just seemed like it was the RESULTS of the old philosophy........
     
  4. nero THE zero

    nero THE zero Hall of Fame

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    I'm hardly an expert on kinesiology, and even I know that compound exercises are exponentially more beneficial than the isolated benefits of machines.

    Maybe I have been naïve, but when I saw all of the machines in the Texans training room, I always just assumed they were for supplemental exercise and/or rarely used--do we know for certain Smith used them central to his training regimen?
     
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  5. Playoffs

    Playoffs Subscribed Contributor

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    From the staff thread...

     
  6. cland

    cland Veteran

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    The old/'new coach' Cedric Smith was a fairly similar Olympic style work-out, and the machines had already been cleared out of the way back in 2010 to be replaced with power clean/manual weights, etc. :

    (This a quote of Stephanie Stradley quoting a houstontexans article that is no longer available)
    I'm sure there are differences, but not as much as described in the video of the change from Penn State's HIT/machine style workouts.
     
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  7. HOU-TEX

    HOU-TEX Ah, Football!

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    Thanks. I remember having the discussion with PN and a few others around here about Cedric getting rid of the machines.

    I truly hope he's able to do something that can translate to more speed on the field. Maybe it was our patch work for a LB corps, I dunno, but it seemed like we were always a step slower
     
  8. CloakNNNdagger

    CloakNNNdagger Site Contributor

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    Despite the original purported emphasis of Cedric on "losing" the machines, all indications from what I observed when passing the facility and from those I had opportunity to speak to, were that in practice, the machines were still a very significant part of the routine our players actually followed.
     
  9. Mr teX

    Mr teX Hall of Fame

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    Guy seems full of energy & he's taking the right approach. machines can only go so deep in working out your musculature. Anyone who's seriously worked out knows that it's those 2nd & 3rd layers of mostly core postural muscles that put you over the top in terms of strength & explosiveness.

    & You usually can't get at those muscle groups with machines. Free weights and "action" type exercises are the best way. That's when you start hearing people say things like "i'm sore in places i never knew i had muscles at."

    If it's anything like he stated in the video, His methods are gonna introduce alot of shock to their muscles & many of these guys are gonna find out they weren't as strong as they thought they were.
     
  10. bah007

    bah007 Hall of Fame

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    I posted this over in the staff thread but I'll drop it here too since it applies:

    In this day and age it is really hard for me to believe that a top program like Penn St would have a S&C program based on HIT principles. In my experience, coaches who predominantly use HIT follow that style because they are unable to or uncomfortable trying to diagnose flaws in technique. Therefore, they don't want their players using heavy weights because the injury risk is magnified.

    And machines don't put a premium on technique. They actually require no technique at all because the load can only move in a fixed range of motion.

    The HIT style is fine and dandy if you play a sport that requires long term muscular endurance with little explosive power.

    But football isn't like that. You need a certain level of endurance but each play is done at full speed and only lasts about five or six seconds at most. Because of that, you should train to maximize your ability to create power as quickly as possible so that you can make an impact within that small window of time.

    The Olympic training method is IMO the best way to attain this. If you watch the video that CND linked you hear Fitzgerald talk about triple extension, which is the movement pattern from the ankle to the knee to the hip. The foundation of all explosive power comes from that movement and by mimicking those movements under a load in training you should be able to transfer that ability to the field.
     
  11. Playoffs

    Playoffs Subscribed Contributor

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  12. houstonspartan

    houstonspartan Hall of Fame

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    Commenting as a fan based on just what I've seen on the field the last few years, I have long wondered about our strength and conditioning program. Yes, every team has injuries, but, it always seemed as if our injuries were frequent, and recovery from them lasted longer than most teams.

    Just an observation.
     
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  13. otisbean

    otisbean All Pro

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    Huh? 2-3 layer of muscles is where strength and explosiveness comes from? As a 19yr strength I would disagree. Your deep core muscles are indeed important for spinal stabilization and posture but I'd say the glutes, quads and hammies are more important for strength and explosiveness
     
  14. amazing80

    amazing80 Site Contributor

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    Meh, make them do insanity and p90x and they will be good ;)
     
  15. Corrosion

    Corrosion Idealist

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    /derail

    I'd rather see a change in the philosophy on the ass end of the defense with more physical play and no more damn 7-10 yard cushions for receivers.

    /carry on
     
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  16. DBCooper

    DBCooper Outlaw

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    Man to man.
     
  17. The Pencil Neck

    The Pencil Neck Subscribed Contributor

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    I thought the LAST guys got rid of the machines? I thought the last guys went to a pure free weight approach?

    And I'm not a fan of the HIT approach at all. HIIT is good; HIT, not so much. Especially for an athlete.
     
  18. ObsiWan

    ObsiWan Site Contributor

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    Please translate for us couch potatoes who think lifting anything heavier than a 12-pack should be done with a fork lift...
    :ohsnap:
     
  19. Playoffs

    Playoffs Subscribed Contributor

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    High Intensity Training; High Intensity Interval Training
     
  20. The Pencil Neck

    The Pencil Neck Subscribed Contributor

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    HIT is primarily a workout routine for bodybuilding. It's not a performance oriented routine. You train each bodypart at most once a week. And when you train it, you train it to failure.

    HIT was developed by Arthur Jones, the guy who developed Nautilus machines and an integral part of HIT was originally working with machines instead of free weights. It has a tendency to neglect connective tissue and for athletes, this can turn into a lot of injuries: strains, pulls, etc.

    The best way to get a lot out of HIT is to take tons of steroids while you're doing it along with HGH to protect your connective tissue. Of course, that's true of any training regimen but it's even more true for a HIT based approach.

    I prefer an Olympic Lift oriented routine that focuses on speed and power along with a bunch of moves that are designed to mimic in-game motions. Or even a powerlifting based routine. Athletes should not be training like bodybuilders.

    HIIT, otoh, is an approach to aerobic work where you alternate intervals. The HIIT approach to aerobic work has a lot of good studies behind it. It's better than just getting on a treadmill for an hour.
     

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