Go Back   Houston Texans Message Board & Forum - TexansTalk.com > Football Talk > The National Football League
Home Forums Register FAQDonate Automatic Monthly Contribution Members List Mark Forums Read


The National Football League League News & Current Events

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-10-2011   #1
CloakNNNdagger
Hall of Fame
 
CloakNNNdagger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15,768
Rep Power: 195074 CloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Stretching can be dangerous.............

...............if performed BEFORE warmup exercises instead of after.

I originally posted this in the Andre Johnson hammy injury: Early reports say "not serious" thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CloakNNNdagger View Post
The thing that I've noticed and has been bothering me is that right when the players hit the field for pregame "warmups," they begin their stretching exercises.
After speaking to Infrantrycak, I thought I needed to post this to clarify my concerns on the injury front.
Quote:
Want a better workout? Don't stretch before
Do a light jog or sport-specific warm-up, experts say


By Maria Cheng AP Medical Writer

LONDON — Want a better workout? Then don't stretch beforehand, some experts say.

Many people take it for granted that they should start their exercise routines with some stretching on the spot, perhaps hoping it will loosen them up for their workout. Most fitness experts now agree this kind of static stretching before exercise is not just counter-productive, but potentially harmful.

Traditional stretches, like when people bend over to touch their toes or stretch their legs on a fence, often cause the muscles to tighten rather than relax — exactly the opposite of what is needed for physical activity.

Experts say it is like extending a rubber band to its limit. When people stretch to the maximum, they are more likely to pull a muscle.

"We have developed this idea of static stretching at exactly the wrong time," said Kieran O'Sullivan, an exercise expert at the University of Limerick in Ireland, who has studied various types of stretching and their impact on athletes.

When you stretch before exercising, your body may think it's at risk of being overstretched. It compensates by contracting and becoming more tense. That means you aren't able to move as fast or as freely, making you more likely to get hurt.

O'Sullivan said stretching helps with flexibility, but people should only do it when they aren't about to exercise, like after a workout, or at the end of the day.

"It's like weight training to become stronger," he said. "You wouldn't do a weight session right before you exercise, and you shouldn't stretch right before either."

In the last few years, several studies have found static stretching before playing a sport makes you slower and weaker.

And when experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention combed through more than 100 papers looking at stretching studies, they found people who stretched before exercise were no less likely to suffer injuries such as a pulled muscle, which the increased flexibility from stretching is supposed to prevent.

Warm up with a light jog

Instead of stretching, many experts recommend warming up with a light jog or sport-specific exercise, like kicking for football or a few serves for tennis. That type of light movement increases the heart rate and blood flow to the muscles, warming up the body temperature.

"This allows you to approach your full range of motion, but in a very controlled way," said Dr. Anders Cohen, chief of neurosurgery and spine surgery at the Brooklyn Hospital Center and former physician for the U.S. Tennis Open. Cohen said elite athletes in all sports are increasingly ditching static stretching and using other warm-up techniques instead.

But the message has yet to trickle down to legions of joggers and recreational athletes. "This is classic, old-school stretching that has been done for generations," Cohen said. "It's going to be very hard to convince people to start doing something different."

There's more news for the traditionalists: research shows static stretching doesn't work as well as more active kinds of stretching that incorporate movement, such as lunges.

In a study published earlier this year in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Roberto Meroni of the University of Milan and colleagues found people who stretched using conventional techniques, like bending over to touch their toes, were less flexible than those who did a more active type of stretching that used more muscle groups.

Meroni said static stretching simply forces the muscle being stretched to endure the pain of that stretch. With active stretches that work more muscles, the stretched muscles learn to extend while another group is working.

Those types of stretches are commonly used in yoga, which emphasizes how the body is aligned during stretches, not just flexibility. Many yoga poses involve the whole body and focus not only on stretching a particular muscle, but the ligaments, tendons and joints around it.

Still, experts don't discount static stretching entirely. Lynn Millar, a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, said they recommend people stretch several times a week and that most types of stretching work.

Maximizing the benefits of stretching may simply boil down to a matter of when you do it and how, according to Jonny Booth, a health and fitness manager at a north London branch of gym chain Fitness First.

"If you are going to stretch your muscles and then do some intense training, you're not going to get fantastic results," he said.

Instead, Booth recommends active stretches that mimic the movement of your intended activity, like some deep knee lunges while walking for runners.

"Stretching is vital to become more flexible," Booth said. "But it has to be done at the right time and for the right reasons."
Quote:
Stretching: The Truth
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS

WHEN DUANE KNUDSON, a professor of kinesiology at California State University, Chico, looks around campus at athletes warming up before practice, he sees one dangerous mistake after another. “They’re stretching, touching their toes. . . . ” He sighs. “It’s discouraging.”

If you’re like most of us, you were taught the importance of warm-up exercises back in grade school, and you’ve likely continued with pretty much the same routine ever since. Science, however, has moved on. Researchers now believe that some of the more entrenched elements of many athletes’ warm-up regimens are not only a waste of time but actually bad for you. The old presumption that holding a stretch for 20 to 30 seconds — known as static stretching — primes muscles for a workout is dead wrong. It actually weakens them. In a recent study conducted at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, athletes generated less force from their leg muscles after static stretching than they did after not stretching at all. Other studies have found that this stretching decreases muscle strength by as much as 30 percent. Also, stretching one leg’s muscles can reduce strength in the other leg as well, probably because the central nervous system rebels against the movements.

“There is a neuromuscular inhibitory response to static stretching,” says Malachy McHugh, the director of research at the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. The straining muscle becomes less responsive and stays weakened for up to 30 minutes after stretching, which is not how an athlete wants to begin a workout.

THE RIGHT WARM-UP should do two things: loosen muscles and tendons to increase the range of motion of various joints, and literally warm up the body. When you’re at rest, there’s less blood flow to muscles and tendons, and they stiffen. “You need to make tissues and tendons compliant before beginning exercise,” Knudson says.

A well-designed warm-up starts by increasing body heat and blood flow. Warm muscles and dilated blood vessels pull oxygen from the bloodstream more efficiently and use stored muscle fuel more effectively. They also withstand loads better. One significant if gruesome study found that the leg-muscle tissue of laboratory rabbits could be stretched farther before ripping if it had been electronically stimulated — that is, warmed up.

To raise the body’s temperature, a warm-up must begin with aerobic activity, usually light jogging. Most coaches and athletes have known this for years. That’s why tennis players run around the court four or five times before a match and marathoners stride in front of the starting line. But many athletes do this portion of their warm-up too intensely or too early. A 2002 study of collegiate volleyball players found that those who’d warmed up and then sat on the bench for 30 minutes had lower backs that were stiffer than they had been before the warm-up. And a number of recent studies have demonstrated that an overly vigorous aerobic warm-up simply makes you tired. Most experts advise starting your warm-up jog at about 40 percent of your maximum heart rate (a very easy pace) and progressing to about 60 percent. The aerobic warm-up should take only 5 to 10 minutes, with a 5-minute recovery. (Sprinters require longer warm-ups, because the loads exerted on their muscles are so extreme.) Then it’s time for the most important and unorthodox part of a proper warm-up regimen, the Spider-Man and its counterparts.

“TOWARDS THE end of my playing career, in about 2000, I started seeing some of the other guys out on the court doing these strange things before a match and thinking, What in the world is that?” says Mark Merklein, 36, once a highly ranked tennis player and now a national coach for the United States Tennis Association. The players were lunging, kicking and occasionally skittering, spider-like, along the sidelines. They were early adopters of a new approach to stretching.

While static stretching is still almost universally practiced among amateur athletes — watch your child’s soccer team next weekend — it doesn’t improve the muscles’ ability to perform with more power, physiologists now agree. “You may feel as if you’re able to stretch farther after holding a stretch for 30 seconds,” McHugh says, “so you think you’ve increased that muscle’s readiness.” But typically you’ve increased only your mental tolerance for the discomfort of the stretch. The muscle is actually weaker.

Stretching muscles while moving, on the other hand, a technique known as dynamic stretching or dynamic warm-ups, increases power, flexibility and range of motion. Muscles in motion don’t experience that insidious inhibitory response. They instead get what McHugh calls “an excitatory message” to perform.

Dynamic stretching is at its most effective when it’s relatively sports specific. “You need range-of-motion exercises that activate all of the joints and connective tissue that will be needed for the task ahead,” says Terrence Mahon, a coach with Team Running USA, home to the Olympic marathoners Ryan Hall and Deena Kastor. For runners, an ideal warm-up might include squats, lunges and “form drills” like kicking your buttocks with your heels. Athletes who need to move rapidly in different directions, like soccer, tennis or basketball players, should do dynamic stretches that involve many parts of the body. “Spider-Man” is a particularly good drill: drop onto all fours and crawl the width of the court, as if you were climbing a wall. (For other dynamic stretches, see the sidebar below.)

Even golfers, notoriously nonchalant about warming up (a recent survey of 304 recreational golfers found that two-thirds seldom or never bother), would benefit from exerting themselves a bit before teeing off. In one 2004 study, golfers who did dynamic warm- up exercises and practice swings increased their clubhead speed and were projected to have dropped their handicaps by seven strokes over seven weeks.

Controversy remains about the extent to which dynamic warm-ups prevent injury. But studies have been increasingly clear that static stretching alone before exercise does little or nothing to help. The largest study has been done on military recruits; results showed that an almost equal number of subjects developed lower-limb injuries (shin splints, stress fractures, etc.), regardless of whether they had performed static stretches before training sessions. A major study published earlier this year by the Centers for Disease Control, on the other hand, found that knee injuries were cut nearly in half among female collegiate soccer players who followed a warm-up program that included both dynamic warm-up exercises and static stretching. (For a sample routine, visit www.aclprevent.com/pepprogram.htm.) And in golf, new research by Andrea Fradkin, an assistant professor of exercise science at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, suggests that those who warm up are nine times less likely to be injured.

“It was eye-opening,” says Fradkin, formerly a feckless golfer herself. “I used to not really warm up. I do now.”
Stretching before exercise can lead to less flexibility, tighter muscles, and injury. Yes, stretching is important. However, it is only useful and necessary when performed after a work out or activity. Ask yourself, what is the purpose of a warm up? Simple right, to warm up our body and prepare our muscles for the action to come. Well, stretching does not warm up our muscles! And ironically, stretching cold muscles can cause rather than prevent an injury. When our muscles are cold, or in their natural state, they are rigid. This inflexibility makes them sensitive to any strains or changes in length, and therefore susceptible to over-extension. However, once our body temperature is up and blood flows to our muscles, they are ready to take advantage of the benefits of a relaxing, cool down stretch. Think of a raw piece of spaghetti; if you were to bend it, it would snap in half. But, once you “warm it up,” it will bend any way desired.
CloakNNNdagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #2
hot pickle
السلام عليكم
 
hot pickle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Age: 25
Posts: 2,466
Rep Power: 2074 hot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respectedhot pickle is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

when I was younger and i played a lot of hockey I would never participate in stretches before a game and my coaches would be pissed... but i always said to them... randy moss doesnt stretch before games and look how good he is. so I'm not stretching either lol
hot pickle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #3
The Pencil Neck
Hall of Fame
 
The Pencil Neck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Dallas, TX
Age: 52
Posts: 17,967
Rep Power: 253530 The Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

This is something that gets drilled into most powerlifters and olympic lifters by their coaches. It's been something that has been in the weight training literature for at least 10 (maybe 20) years now. You only stretch a warm muscle and the best way to get the muscle warm is to do what you're going to do with light weights and then increase them.

I'd expect any decent S&C coach to know it and structure their warm-ups accordingly.
__________________
Adoptee: #55 - Chris Myers.
The Pencil Neck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #4
steelbtexan
Hall of Fame
 
steelbtexan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Age: 51
Posts: 11,952
Rep Power: 81973 steelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respectedsteelbtexan is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Very interesing article,

I know the Texans were very old school in regards to their workout regimines Rileys' S&C yrs.

Wonder if the new S&C regime look at articles like this and adjust their routines accordingly? It doesn't appear that the Texans do the light jogging routine before stretching atleast when they're on the field. I can imagine player taking upon themselves to do light jogging in the tunnel before stretching on the field.

If this is the case then according to the article Texans players are not only weaking their muscles by using an incorrect routine. The incorrect routine could be contributing to the rash of achilles/hamstring injuries that have seemed to plague the Texans this yr.

PS. thanks for the article, I will be warming up for atleast 5 mins before playing golf now.
steelbtexan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #5
TheCD
All Pro
 
TheCD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Wichita Falls, TX
Age: 28
Posts: 981
Rep Power: 1036 TheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respectedTheCD is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Does this apply just to muscles? I ask because I just had surgery to repair my Achilles that I tore playing some light touch football, and my orthopedic surgeon said that he sees most of these injuries occur due to a lack of stretching before hard exercise. Then again, he could have said warming up and my brain assumed stretching.
TheCD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #6
The Pencil Neck
Hall of Fame
 
The Pencil Neck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Dallas, TX
Age: 52
Posts: 17,967
Rep Power: 253530 The Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respectedThe Pencil Neck is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCD View Post
Does this apply just to muscles? I ask because I just had surgery to repair my Achilles that I tore playing some light touch football, and my orthopedic surgeon said that he sees most of these injuries occur due to a lack of stretching before hard exercise. Then again, he could have said warming up and my brain assumed stretching.
A lot of people inadvertently use "stretching" and "warming up" synonymously when they shouldn't. And there are a lot of doctors that aren't aware of this research.

You need to warm up before you play sports. And you need to stretch as a regular part of your workout. Missing out on either one can lead to injury.
__________________
Adoptee: #55 - Chris Myers.
The Pencil Neck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #7
CloakNNNdagger
Hall of Fame
 
CloakNNNdagger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15,768
Rep Power: 195074 CloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Quote:
Originally Posted by steelbtexan View Post
Very interesing article,

I know the Texans were very old school in regards to their workout regimines Rileys' S&C yrs.

Wonder if the new S&C regime look at articles like this and adjust their routines accordingly? It doesn't appear that the Texans do the light jogging routine before stretching atleast when they're on the field. I can imagine player taking upon themselves to do light jogging in the tunnel before stretching on the field.

If this is the case then according to the article Texans players are not only weaking their muscles by using an incorrect routine. The incorrect routine could be contributing to the rash of achilles/hamstring injuries that have seemed to plague the Texans this yr.




PS. thanks for the article, I will be warming up for atleast 5 mins before playing golf now.
It is unlikely that they can get much of a warmup coming though the tunnel. And from what I have gathered, warmups prior to going through the tunnel are not typical.
CloakNNNdagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
Old 12-10-2011   #8
CloakNNNdagger
Hall of Fame
 
CloakNNNdagger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15,768
Rep Power: 195074 CloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCD View Post
Does this apply just to muscles? I ask because I just had surgery to repair my Achilles that I tore playing some light touch football, and my orthopedic surgeon said that he sees most of these injuries occur due to a lack of stretching before hard exercise. Then again, he could have said warming up and my brain assumed stretching.
The Pencil Neck's advice is sound.

Keep in mind ALL tendons are attached to MUSCLES. If the muscles aren't warmed up to be able to stretch properly, both the muscles and their corresponding tendons are at risk to tear. In you particular case, the gastrocnemius muscles (calf muscles) are the muscles that attach to the Achilles tendon. That's why anytime I see a "calf" listed on Injury Report, especially for a length of time (such as Bullman), I worry that actually something may be going on with the Achilles tendon.
Quote:

The Mechanism of Injury of Achilles tendon rupture


The exact cause of ruptures is hard to say. It can happen suddenly, without warning, or following a tendonitis. It seems that weak calf muscles may contribute to problems. If the muscles are weak and become fatigued, they may tighten and shorten. Overuse can also be a problem by leading to muscle fatigue.

The more fatigued the calf muscles are, the shorter and tighter they will become. This tightness can increase the stress on the Achilles tendon and result in a rupture.

A rupture is likely when the force on the tendon is greater than the strength of the tendon. If the foot is dorsiflexed while the lower leg moves forward and the calf muscles contract, a rupture may occur. Most ruptures happen during a forceful stretch of the tendon while the calf muscles contract.
link

Fatigue, shortening/tightening all occur with inadequate warming up of the muscles.
CloakNNNdagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #9
CloakNNNdagger
Hall of Fame
 
CloakNNNdagger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15,768
Rep Power: 195074 CloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Listen to this very short VIDEO CLIP to see what LARRY FITZGERALD has to say about the subject..
CloakNNNdagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011   #10
otisbean
All Pro
 
otisbean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 572
Rep Power: 5252 otisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

I've seen the Texans doing dynamic warmups before practice on news reports in the past. Most, if not all NFL teams, do dynamic warm up routines. This is not new info for the strength and conditioning community. The "don't stretch as a warm up" has been around for quite a while.

On a side note, I did martial arts as a HS student and this was when you did stretch to warm up. I actually pulled part of my hamstring tendon off the bone before a workout one day. Not good.
otisbean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2011   #11
Playoffs 
Subscribed Contributor
 
Playoffs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 14,778
Rep Power: 281155 Playoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respectedPlayoffs is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Must spread rep .... geez. Been repping like crazy.

Great post, thanks.
__________________
.
If you root for the Texans to fail so you can throw out an "I told you so", you are not a fan... you're a troll.
Playoffs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2011   #12
sakebomb
Hall of Fame
 
sakebomb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Humble, TX
Posts: 1,275
Rep Power: 1859 sakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respectedsakebomb is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Tony Horton approves this thread.
__________________
2011 - The year of the TEXANS!
sakebomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2011   #13
HJam72
Hall of Fame
 
HJam72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Over here.
Age: 41
Posts: 11,514
Rep Power: 72200 HJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respectedHJam72 is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

I never liked the idea of stretching BEFORE you workout or BEFORE a game. Seems like you're just preparing muscles to get pulled!

I kind of think the time to stretch is before you go to bed....uh, sleep...
__________________

HJam72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2011   #14
otisbean
All Pro
 
otisbean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 572
Rep Power: 5252 otisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respectedotisbean is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Quote:
Originally Posted by HJam72 View Post
I never liked the idea of stretching BEFORE you workout or BEFORE a game. Seems like you're just preparing muscles to get pulled!

I kind of think the time to stretch is before you go to bed....uh, sleep...
Think of your muscles as a stick of chewing gum, take it out of the wrapper, grab both ends and pull - it tears!

Put it in your mouth and chew for a while and it becomes flexible, this is how I think of your muscles and warming up. You need dynamic, movement oriented stretches to properly loosen up and prevent injuries.

Static stretching is best done after training to re-lengthen tight/fatigued muscles. I'll also add once you achieve a good range of motion, spend more time on tight areas (typically ankles (calf and soleus), hip flexors, and pecs) and less time on areas with proper ROM.
otisbean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2011   #15
Lucky
Moderator
 
Lucky's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 13,163
Rep Power: 149994 Lucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respectedLucky is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Stretching can be dangerous.............

Great info, CND! Must spread rep.
__________________
“We’re looking for a coach that...works with great energy and enthusiasm and very positive in his approach.” - Bob McNair
Lucky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   Houston Texans Message Board & Forum - TexansTalk.com > Football Talk > The National Football League
Home Forums Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Ad Management by RedTyger