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Old 09-13-2008   #1
Shaft75
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Default Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

Moving forward, I think that there will be a rush to get Reliant rocking by October.

Does anyone here have any knowledge or expertise in the engineering of our stadium, especially the roof.

It looks as though it is a stretched out type of plastic or a real strong fiber material. How tough will it be to stretch that out and deal with the water damage?

Your thoughts, links???
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Old 09-13-2008   #2
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

I think whoever built Minute Maid should have built Reliant. Although MM did have that green algae thing growing on its roof....
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Old 09-13-2008   #3
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaft75 View Post
Moving forward, I think that there will be a rush to get Reliant rocking by October.

Does anyone here have any knowledge or expertise in the engineering of our stadium, especially the roof.

It looks as though it is a stretched out type of plastic or a real strong fiber material. How tough will it be to stretch that out and deal with the water damage?

Your thoughts, links???
This is from the Chron from an article back in 2002 about stadium roof that I thought interesting....
Quote:
By DAVID BARRON

As you drive at night along the South Loop and gaze at newly built Reliant Stadium, you may think that you see one building that, in the words of its designer, twinkles like a giant jewel box amid Houston's skyline.

What you really see, in the orderly, mathematical world of David Manica and his colleagues at HOK Sports, is two projects -- the stadium, which is impressive in its own right, and the roof, which is unlike anything in the history of American sporting palaces.

Roofed stadiums are, of course, almost old hat in Houston. Reliant Stadium, after all, towers over the building that broke -- and redefined -- the mold, the Reliant Astrodome. From the upper regions of Reliant Stadium's north side, it is possible to see downtown Houston and the baseball complex now known as Minute Maid Park.

Reliant's roof, however, is unique in the small circle of retractable-roof stadiums.

It has two retractable panels, as opposed to three at SkyDome in Toronto and six at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix. The panels retract in opposite directions, similar to the BOB's roof but unlike the two moving panels at Minute Maid and Safeco Field in Seattle, which travel in the same direction. Miller Park in Milwaukee also has two moving panels, but they retract in a fan-shaped pattern.

Manica's first challenge in designing what would become Reliant Stadium actually came back in the days when the NFL's return to Houston was little more than a pipe dream.

In 1997, the stadium-to-be was a decidedly different project. For one thing, the roof was fixed, not retractable.

"That was the initial design," he said. "But the tenant requirements between the football team and the rodeo were such that the rodeo would require the roof to be closed. They were not interested in being a part of an open-air facility.

"Houston was competing with Los Angeles at the time to get the team, and there is no doubt that the NFL prefers an open-air stadium with natural grass. So the best way to solve that problem was to design the new building here with an operable roof."

Manica's first drawings of a roof that would open and close began in the summer in 1997 and proceeded in fits and starts for the next two years as Texans owner-to-be Bob McNair wooed and eventually won the rights to the NFL's 32nd franchise.

HOK's original plan for the roof called for an "accordion-style" roof -- one that, in visual terms, would simply "fold up and go away" when opened. That plan, Manica explained, would prevent the roof from "overpowering" the stadium by setting too heavily, in a design sense, over the rest of the building.

"But that started to present some interesting engineering complications and cost and maintenance worries," he said. "And so we moved away from the accordion to the simple roof panel."

To be exact, two roof panels -- each 240 feet long and 385 feet wide. From midfield, one panel slides to the north and one to the south along a set of tracks placed along the 967-foot long "super trusses" that frame the roof structure.

When the roof is fully retracted, the open space above the playing field is 350 feet wide by 500 feet long - 175,000 square feet. Unlike Texas Stadium, which has trusses that span the open portion of its roof, the Reliant Stadium roof is completely open to the elements when the two panels are retracted.

And, unlike the roof at Minute Maid Park, which whether open or closed is easily the defining element of that stadium, the Reliant roof is just that -- a top that doesn't overwhelm everything beneath.

"We keep the visual weight of the roof down by not stacking panels, like they do with the roof at Minute Maid Park," Manica said.

The second unique element -- at least as it applies to retractable-roof stadiums in the United States -- is that the roof material is made of fabric. Specifically, a Teflon-coated, fiberglass fabric manufactured by Birdair Inc. of Amherst, N.Y.

"We wanted to have the feel of an open-air stadium, even with the roof closed," Manica said. "When you walk around the Astrodome, you walk through circular, dark concourses. We wanted to have more light with the comforts of climate control, and the fabric was an important part of that design."

Birdair fabrics were used in the United States for the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, the Metrodome in Minneapolis, the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis and Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. Elsewhere, the company installed fabric roofs on the Millennium Dome in London, Olympic Stadium in Rome, Hiroshima Stadium in Japan and Shanghai Stadium in China.

"We used a high-translucency version of the fabric, which requires a lot of special care to install as opposed to the standard fabric," said Clark Martens, project manager for Birdair. "It allows 24 percent to 25 percent of the outside light to get through. The Georgia Dome roof, by comparison, allows maybe 10 percent."

As with all projects, there are tradeoffs in using fabric, Manica said.

"Fabric is more expensive than using a hard roof surface of decking and membrane," he said. "However, we found that not needing the additional amount of structural steel to hold up the weight of the roof would offset the cost of the fabric. So we came up with the most cost-effective roof that could be designed for this building."

This particular element of architectural haute couture cost about $10 million. However, Martens said, it is engineered to carry full hurricane loads, including winds of more than 100 mph. Try that with your garden-variety Armani frock.

The fabric also creates a vaulted frame over the roof frame to help shed water and to "give a sense of space for those inside inside the seating bowl," Manica said. A series of 10 steel cables, each two inches in diameter and capable of exerting 200,000 pounds of pressure, secure the fabric to the roof structure and create the series of peaks and valleys.

"This is relatively new for the United States, but if you go to Europe, fabric roofs are much more of the norm," Martens said. "The next domed stadium that will be built in this country will be the football stadium in Phoenix, and that also will be fabric. We think it is a cost-competitive system, and it gives you a lot of nice attributes, such as that feel of natural daylight."

The job of making the roof panels and their giant fabric swatches move to and fro fell to Cyril Silberman, president of Uni-Systems Inc. of Minneapolis, who also designed the transport system at Minute Maid Park.

This system, however, is as different from Minute Maid's as football differs from baseball, Silberman said.

For one thing, the Reliant Stadium roof is lighter - 3,000 tons, as opposed to 9,000 tons at Minute Maid, including the sliding glass wall that runs along Crawford Street. That difference made for some, as Silberman gingerly described it, challenging design problems.

"The Reliant roof could depart the stadium under a number of different circumstances if we didn't do something special with it," he said. "In winds of 50 mph from the right direction, in theory it could sail away if you didn't have a retention system. And you have 50 mph winds at least 10 times a year during thunderstorms.

"Consequently, this roof has a very complex electrical and mechanical system that measures the wind and keeps the roof gripped firmly on its rails and moves it with timers and sensors that make it absolutely impossible for the roof ever to get away."



Read more here: LINK
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Old 09-13-2008   #4
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brando View Post
This is from the Chron from an article back in 2002 about stadium roof that I thought interesting....





Read more here: LINK
Excellent find. That is a great article.

Now the question is: Do they have that tefflon in supply?

And: How long to get it installed?

Excellent post though brando.
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Old 09-13-2008   #5
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

More about the roof:
from the manufacturer
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Old 09-13-2008   #6
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

Quote:
"Fabric is more expensive than using a hard roof surface of decking and membrane," he said. "However, we found that not needing the additional amount of structural steel to hold up the weight of the roof would offset the cost of the fabric. So we came up with the most cost-effective roof that could be designed for this building."

This particular element of architectural haute couture cost about $10 million. However, Martens said, it is engineered to carry full hurricane loads, including winds of more than 100 mph. Try that with your garden-variety Armani frock.
Seems like Mr. McNair should get a refund.
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Old 09-13-2008   #7
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

Oops.

Losing 5 out of 9 panels might qualify the design idea as a costly mistake.
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Old 09-13-2008   #8
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

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Oops.

Losing 5 out of 9 panels might qualify the design idea as a costly mistake.
True...

But, I just want it fixed so we can have our home opener. Maybe we bought a ten year warranty.
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Old 09-13-2008   #9
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

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True...

But, I just want it fixed so we can have our home opener. Maybe we bought a ten year warranty.
I wonder how that works out. When you go through the check out line at Roofs-R-Us, does a sales clerk ask you if you want the $1 million extended warranty on it?

Cheap-ass Bob prolly stared at the brochure for a minute, stared at the sales clerk, stared back at the warranty brochure for a second, paused, took a big sigh, and said "Nah. Now do I just pull around and you guys have someone to help me load this thing up?"

Just venting here, folks. But I bet there is a HUGE peeing match between Bob and the company that built/engineered the roof. Who pays for it?
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Old 09-13-2008   #10
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Default Re: Reliant Roof Damage/Construction

I would imagine that HCSCC would have insurance on Reliant.
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