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The Blazing Arrow "Rivalry Talk" Rival fans & lighthearted smack talk. Keep it light and leave the mean spirited stuff at home please.

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Old 03-24-2015   #641
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

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Originally Posted by thunderkyss View Post
Low risk?

I'd be worried Goddell would change his mind & suspend him for the season.
And then they're on the hook for what? Something like a mil or less? He pretty much gets paid game to game.
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Old 03-28-2015   #642
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

Adrian Peterson a Cowboy? Never say never
Quote:
The Adrian Peterson to Dallas rumors just won’t die.

No matter how illogical and downright impossible it seems financially.

And never mind that the Minnesota Vikings have consistently said they have no plans to cut or trade the All-Pro running back.

It’s a decided long shot.

Yet, the rumors just won’t go away.

So enough with shooting them down.

Time will tell, one way or another.

Let’s talk about why it could happen...
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #643
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

Aaron Wilson ‏@RavensInsider
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Ravens traded center Gino Gradkowski and a 2016 draft pick to the Denver Broncos in exchange for a 2016 draft pick.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #644
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

Rolando McClain is returning for another year and Romo restructured his contract.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #645
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

Adam Schefter @AdamSchefter
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Greg Hardy of the Dallas Cowboys was notified today that he is suspended without pay for the team’s first 10 games of the 2015 regular season for conduct detrimental to the league in violation of the NFL Constitution and By-Laws, the NFL Player Contract, and the NFL Personal Conduct Policy.

In a letter from Commissioner Roger Goodell, Hardy was informed that an extensive two-month NFL investigation following the dismissal of his case in North Carolina state court determined that there was sufficient credible evidence that Hardy engaged in conduct that violated NFL policies in multiple respects and with aggravating circumstances.

The investigation was led by Lisa Friel and T&M Protection Resources. Prior to joining the NFL staff two weeks ago, Friel was vice president of the sexual misconduct consulting and investigations division of T&M. During a 28-year career as a Manhattan prosecutor, Friel was head of the sex crimes prosecution unit in the New York County district attorney’s office for more than a decade. Friel is now NFL senior vice president and special counsel for investigations.

The NFL’s investigation involved numerous interviews with witnesses and experts, a review of hundreds of pages of court records, documents and exhibits, photographs, police reports, medical records, and reports and opinions of medical experts retained by Hardy’s attorneys and by the NFL office.

In addition, Hardy and his counsel, along with representatives of the NFL Players Association, met with NFL staff and investigators on March 4, at which time Hardy’s counsel made a detailed presentation and shared additional information. Hardy and his counsel also met on March 10 with the independent investigators, at which he was afforded the opportunity to discuss and respond to questions about the events of May 13, 2014. And, after having the opportunity to review certain photographs recently made available by the district attorney’s office in North Carolina, Hardy and his counsel had a further opportunity to discuss the evidence and provide a supplemental report from Hardy’s medical expert.

The NFL’s investigation concluded that Hardy violated the Personal Conduct Policy by using physical force against Nicole Holder in at least four instances. First, he used physical force against her which caused her to land in a bathtub. Second, he used physical force against her which caused her to land on a futon that was covered with at least four semi-automatic rifles. Third, he used physical force against her by placing his hands around Ms. Holder’s neck and applying enough pressure to leave visible marks. And fourth, he used physical force to shove Ms. Holder against a wall in his apartment’s entry hallway.

“The net effect of these acts was that Ms. Holder was severely traumatized and sustained a range of injuries, including bruises and scratches on her neck, shoulders, upper chest, back, arms and feet,” Commissioner Goodell wrote. “The use of physical force under the circumstances present here, against a woman substantially smaller than you and in the presence of powerful, military-style assault weapons, constitutes a significant act of violence in violation of the Personal Conduct Policy.”

Commissioner Goodell noted that Hardy engaged in conduct detrimental to the league and that a suspension of this length would be appropriate under any version of the Personal Conduct Policy or its predecessors.

Despite numerous efforts to interview Ms. Holder, the NFL was unable to do so. It is not known whether that is the result of her entering into a civil settlement with Hardy or other factors. The commissioner’s decision is based on findings that are supported by credible corroborating evidence independent of Ms. Holder’s statements and testimony, such as testimony of other witnesses, medical and police reports, expert analyses, and photographs.

The NFL’s investigation also concluded that Hardy failed to provide complete and accurate information to NFL investigators and members of the NFL staff.

Hardy was initially arrested as a result of the May 13 incident and charged with Assault on a Female and Communicating Threats following an altercation with Ms. Holder at his residence in Charlotte, North Carolina. On July 15, he was found guilty of these charges by a state court judge following a bench trial at which both Hardy and the victim testified under oath, and during which photographic and other evidence was admitted in open court and discussed in the presence of the public and the news media. Following the judgment of conviction, Hardy was sentenced to a period of incarceration (which was suspended) and probation.

Hardy then noticed an immediate appeal and was granted a jury trial in accordance with North Carolina law. Under North Carolina law, his appeal had the effect of setting aside the conviction and sentence, and a jury trial was eventually scheduled for February 9, 2015. On September 17, Hardy agreed to be placed on the Reserve/Commissioner Exempt list pending the resolution of the criminal proceeding and subsequently received the entirety of his 2014 salary. After the season, his contract with the Panthers expired and he signed a new contract with the Cowboys.

On the scheduled date of the jury trial, the district attorney for Mecklenburg County moved to dismiss the charges. In his dismissal notice, he said Ms. Holder had “made herself completely unavailable” for purposes of the trial, despite what the district attorney called “extraordinary measures” by law enforcement agencies to find her, and the resulting unfairness of going forward without her live testimony. Both in his filing with the state court and his public statements explaining his decision, the district attorney stated that he had “reliable information” that Ms. Holder had reached a civil settlement with Hardy that was directly related to the events that occurred at his residence on May 13. The district attorney went on to say that Ms. Holder “appears to have intentionally made herself unavailable to the State.” Despite repeated requests, Hardy’s attorneys refused to provide the NFL office with a copy of the settlement agreement or even acknowledge that a settlement agreement exists.

Given the seriousness of the allegations and the guilty judgment after the state court judge’s bench trial, Commissioner Goodell determined that further investigation by the NFL was necessary.

As part of his decision, Commissioner Goodell directed Hardy to obtain a clinical evaluation to be conducted by a qualified professional of his choosing. Should counseling or treatment be recommended, Hardy will be expected to comply with those recommendations and provide appropriate releases to allow the NFL office to monitor his compliance with the evaluation and any follow-up care.

Hardy’s suspension will begin on September 5, the day of final roster reductions for NFL teams. He may participate in all preseason activities, including the offseason workout program, organized team activity days, minicamps, training camp, and preseason games. He will be eligible for reinstatement following the Cowboys’ 10th game of the regular season.

“You must have no further adverse involvement with law enforcement and must not commit any additional violations of league policies,” Commissioner Goodell wrote. “In that respect, you should understand that another violation of this nature may result in your banishment from the NFL.”

Hardy may appeal the decision within three days."
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Old 1 Week Ago   #646
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

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Originally Posted by Playoffs View Post
Adam Schefter @AdamSchefter
So he'll be available to take part in most of the annual collapse?
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The Jaguars were the king of bad picks but the Texans just usurped the throne.
Shouted out after the drafting of KJo
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Old 1 Week Ago   #647
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

Furher God'ell is going to have a hard time making this stick. He's punishing players by new standards that he implemented while Hardy committed these offenses (Even though he was found not guilty in a court of law) under the old punishment system.

Time for judge Doty to go back to work.

God bless judge Doty, without him the NFL would still be a form of indentured servitude. (Long live and have great health) Continue to give God'ell he** judge Doty. You are the man.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #648
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Default Re: Lets make fun of them cowboys....

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Hardy’s suspension raises questions about disciplinary process
April 22, 2015, 7:17 PM EDT


From the perspective of the criminal justice system, it never will be known whether Cowboys defensive end Greg Hardy committed domestic violence, because the alleged victim didn’t show up for the jury trial that could have determined his guilt. That happened because Hardy reportedly negotiated a settlement with Nicole Holder, which resulted in him paying an amount of money that she decided was sufficient to end any effort to put him in jail.

Even though Hardy was convicted by a judge last year, the conviction wouldn’t become final until Hardy was found to be guilty beyond a reasonable doubt by a jury of his peers. He wasn’t, and so in the eyes of the law he didn’t do it.

In the eyes of his employer, that doesn’t matter. And his employer has decided that he should miss a total of 25 games for his conduct, even though his conduct ultimately resulted in no criminal sanction of any kind.

The handling of Hardy’s case gives rise to several important questions, which easily can be overlooked when considering the specific allegations that were made against him. It’s important to set aside the underlying facts and consider big-picture protections that extend to all players, innocent or guilty. Otherwise, the NFL could steamroll players without regard to innocence or guilt, all in the name of protecting the shield.

Which is a fancy way of saying protecting the brand. Which is a fancy way of saying stemming the tide of negative publicity.

Given the current temptation at 345 Park Avenue to choose P.R. over principle, Hardy’s case gives rise to three important questions.

1. What standard of proof applies?

Apart from the heinous nature of Hardy’s conduct (if he truly did what he was accused of doing) is the process the NFL has used to determine his guilt and to punish him. The government uses the very high reasonable-doubt, if-it-doesn’t-fit-you-must-acquit standard when determining whether a citizen will lose his or her liberty, but the NFL has no such limitation when deciding whether a player will lose money and/or the ability to play football.

The primary standards in the legal system are the high bar of proof beyond a reasonable doubt in criminal prosecutions, the lower test of clear and convincing evidence in certain civil cases, and the minimal, 51-49 barrier known as preponderance of the evidence, which applies in most lawsuits.

In the statement announcing Hardy’s 10-game suspension, the NFL simply said that the “decision is based on findings that are supported by credible corroborating evidence independent of Ms. Holder’s statements and testimony, such as testimony of other witnesses, medical and police reports, expert analyses, and photographs.” But under what standard is the evidence deemed to be credible, especially with Nicole Holder not cooperating due to the settlement she received?

The idea that the NFL can simply decide what happened without any clear test of the evidence is a potential problem for other players — especially for players who didn’t do what they’re accused of doing. A subjective belief by a prosecutor-turned-league-employee that “credible corroborating evidence” exists isn’t enough. Every prosecutor who brings charges against a defendant believes that “credible corroborating evidence” exists; the challenge becomes finding a fair and objective way to determine whether the evidence really is credible.

Complicating matters in this specific context is the league’s P.R.-driven desire to be perceived as tough against domestic violence, in the aftermath of a scandal that nearly brought down a Commissioner. When the person deciding whether “credible corroborating evidence” exists is working for a man who will never again be anything but “The Enforcer” regarding allegations of domestic violence, it’s safe to assume that the assessment of the evidence may err on the side of finding that it’s both credible and corroborating.

2. Does Hardy’s punishment mesh with the league’s pre-Ray Rice policies?

Unable to apply the new domestic violence policy and penalties retroactively to conduct happening before the rules changed, the NFL contends Hardy’s 10-game penalty would have applied even under the prior approach. And that’s hard to believe.

Under the prior approach, the NFL waited for the legal process to end. Under the prior approach, a first-time offender who ultimately was not found legally responsible possibly would have received no punishment at all. Under the prior approach, a first-time offender deemed to be legally responsible for domestic violence typically received a two-game suspension without pay.

The prior approach disappeared for good not after the Ray Rice elevator video emerged, but after the backlash against the league for the initial Ray Rice suspension of only two games. At that point, the league changed the standard penalty to six games.

But Hardy’s behavior happened before any of those changes were made. Setting aside what he did (assuming that he is indeed guilty), Hardy is entitled to be treated the way he would have been treated under the NFL’s existing approach to domestic violence at the time the behavior occurred. That’s a basic notion of fairness that applies in many settings, to the benefit of everyone.

Rules can’t be changed after the fact to apply looking backward to things that already have happened. Otherwise, folks can get away with making up the rules as they go. Which is what many have repeatedly accused the NFL of doing over the past several months.

3. Why don’t players get credit for time served?

The Rice video created a separate problem for Hardy, along with Adrian Peterson. In the aftermath of the release of the video, the NFL decided that neither Hardy nor Peterson could suit up and play. So the league and the union clumsily negotiated an arrangement pursuant to which the players didn’t play, but that they would be paid their usual salaries.

That seat-of-the-pants/get-the-heat-out-of-the-kitchen approach has since become the law of the land, with players accused of violent crimes now subject to paid leave until the cases are resolved, and then subject to unpaid leave thereafter.

It didn’t make sense during the chaos of September, and it makes even less sense now. Players who miss games with pay and then miss games without pay face a double punishment. Though paid for the games that happened before the charges are resolved, players primarily want to play football — a reality NFL executive V.P. of football operations Troy Vincent conceded in a conversation last year with Peterson.

“You were away from the game,” Vincent told Peterson. “You were not participating, even though it was a paid leave. You were not participating. And ballplayers know their shelf life.”

Why not give the player credit for the games missed during paid leave, and then impose a fine reflecting the number of games he ultimately was suspended after the case was resolved? Hardy, for example, missed 15 games in 2014 with pay. If the final punishment is 10 games, the NFL should fine him the equivalent of 10 of the game checks he received.

Instead, the league believes Hardy should miss 25 games for behavior that previously would have resulted in a two-game suspension. And even though the NFL has since realized that a two-game suspension isn’t enough in situations of this nature, the standard penalty at the time of Hardy’s incident was two games.

It’s possible to raise questions like this without endorsing the behavior in which a player has engaged. If Hardy did what he’s accused of doing, he should face serious scrutiny; indeed, he should be in jail.

But all players have rights, and it’s important to remember this at a time when the NFL may feel compelled to disregard those rights in the name of avoiding another P.R. nightmare that, next time around, might not end until the Commissioner’s tenure does.
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