View Single Post
Old 07-14-2008   #263
76Texan
Hall of Fame
 
76Texan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 13,500
Rep Power: 81730 76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected76Texan is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Sage want a chance to be a starter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pencil Neck View Post
According to everything that was said about Kolb during that draft, everyone's big knock on Kolb was the fact that he spent very little time under the center and had a lot of work to do on his footwork. He would have to learn an entirely different game no matter where he went. He himself, iirc, even mentioned on the NFLN's combine coverage about how he wasn't as smooth at taking the ball from under center and dropping back as the other guys during the drills because he'd never really had to do it that much before.

I'll look around and see if I can track down the tape or transcript of that.
Something interesting I found, JFYI.

http://www.footballoutsiders.com/200...eep-zone/6351/

......
So if teams have been spreading the field for a decade or more, why does it suddenly look new? One thing that has changed in recent years is the number of shotgun sets. Check out the rise in passes from the shotgun in the past four seasons:

Year Pct of passes
from shotgun
2004 20.1%
2005 24.7%
2006 30.3%
2007 41.5%

This is radical change in just a few seasons, and it’s probably due to the success Peyton Manning had using shotgun sets on non-passing downs four or five years ago. You can go team-by-team, quarterback-by-quarterback, and see philosophies change. Donovan McNabb threw 77 passes from the shotgun in 2006 but 245 in 2007. Broncos quarterbacks threw 70 shotgun passes in 2005, 109 in 2006, and 255 in 2007.

The rise in shotgun sets explains why teams are classifying the new trend as a rise in “spread” offenses, not as a return to the run ‘n’ shoot, which didn’t use the shotgun much. Meyer’s spread-option, which is taking college football by storm, is built almost exclusively around shotgun formations, though Meyer-inspired teams will often use two running backs and a tight end in shotgun sets. NFL teams like the Jaguars take a similar approach, keeping the backs and tight end on the field and running delays and draws from the shotgun. The real trend in the NFL may be that teams are finding new ways to run the ball from shotgun sets, allowing them to use the shotgun on first-and-10, adding much more variety to already complex offenses.

But while teams may be adopting some Meyer principles, nobody is running a spread-option in the NFL. And technically, teams aren’t “spreading the field” any more than they have been for the last decade. Shotgun offenses are on the rise, not spread offenses. A semantic point, but it’s important to get our terminology as precise as possible.
76Texan is offline   Reply With Quote