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Old 05-08-2004   #10
Mistril48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Number19
Perhaps someone can offer a clarification on the Chronicle's statement that the downside of Wong moving to the right side is that he will be facing LT's. Smith will be lining up as the RDE, I believe, over the LT. Who will be blocking him? The OG? It seems to me that in this scenerio, Smith could become a "blocker" on the LT, giving our ROLB a clear shot to the QB, taking on only the FB or HB. It just seems that there is a serious mismatch on that side; and how did we manage to have so few sacks these past two years?
Typically, the LOLB is outside the shoulder of the TE and the LOLB is outside the should of the LT. Accordingly, the ROLB has a shorter distance to the quarterback (Advantage). The Chronicle says 'Theoretically, the move should give Wong a better chance as a pass rusher ...' Vic Fangio tried to point out that there were advantages and disadvantages of rushing from both positions by pointing out that there have been many excellent pass rushers who worked on the left side (Kevin Greene and Reggie White).

The disadvantage of the ROLB is that the offensive coordinators understand the shorter distance and put their best pass blocking tackle, in space, on the left side (usually also the quarterback's blind side.) The Chronicle's statement also referred to the fact that the ROLB will usually face the best blocking tackle.

Without blitzing, there are five offensive lineman blocking four rushers. In a 4-3 the left tackle slides out to cover the right defensive end. Against a 3-4, the left tackle slides out to get the ROLB, if he is the 4th rusher. Depending on the pass protection, the left guard could be sliding out to help the left tackle, or working on a defensive tackle with the center. Pass protection packages also introduce support (and blitz pickup) from running backs and TEs in certain situations.

If the RDE (4-3) or the ROLB (3-4) has a clear shot at the quarterback around the outside of the tackle, there has been a breakdown on pass protection. The tackle should have slid out to pick him up.

A nice overload would be to send the NT between the center and the left guard and the RDE outside of the left tackle, requiring him to go with him. You then send both Sharper and the ROLB between the left guard and the left tackle.
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