Thread: Own Worst Enemy
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Old 12-06-2013   #7
EVOLVIST
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Default Re: Own Worst Enemy

I don't like to quote myself, but in this case I will given that I just posted this in the Keenum thread. Odd.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EVOLVIST View Post
Except that all the adjectives that have described Kubiak as a "Quarterback Guru" and "Offensive Genius," are all based upon Gary's archaic, outmoded, backup quarterback mentality, so that honorifics of this sort no longer apply to him. At one time, yes! In 2013 the game has passed him by; consequently, Gary's myopia has extended to Case Keenum, TJ Yates, and yes, even to Matt Schaub, and it has shown in their gameplay and predictability, all predicated on Kubiak's "teaching."

I am sincerely convinced that the regression of TJ Yates and now Case Keenum, is not wholly, but in part attributed to young men buying into old concepts. The talent of the man throwing the football is of course a major factor, but we've all seen two guys come in and light it up like gangbusters, only to regress the more they are inoculated into the system.

There is also no doubt that opposing teams having game film on Keenum has contributed to Case's regression; still, game film primarily identifies tendencies that can be exploited. But every QB that has ever played has tendencies - and even the best QBs fall prey to their shortcomings, either by means of human error or an opposing team/coach/player being that good at exposing you. Some tendencies can be corrected. Some cannot. Whatever the case, it's a process...and anyone who's ever done any self-work on themselves knows it doesn't happen overnight.

The tendencies of the player, however, does not dictate constant 7-step drops, coupled with long developing routes, with a blitz in your grill nearly ever 3rd down. These errors in coaching create artificial tendencies - yet tendencies, nonetheless - that retard growth and lose games.

Bless his heart, but Gary Kubiak was the perfect self-scratching itch.
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