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Old 11-23-2013   #17
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: Injury Report: Texans vs. Jags

Quote:
Originally Posted by TejasTom View Post
I don't want to take anything away from Tate. That's tough regardless of why he's doing it.

I also heard today that KJ's is the very top rib(#1). It runs under the collar bone. They said its not possible to to pad extra like Tate. Maybe CND can elaborate it.





Isolated 1st rib fractures are very uncommon because of the "protected" position of this rib. It is actually located behind the clavicle and upper sternum (breast bone), and not easily exposed to trauma as are the other ribs (See the diagram immediately below).



You see these type of injuries in front on high impact auto accidents.........and they are usually accompanied by other (many times massive) injuries such as clavicular fractures, shoulder fractures, other rib fractures, major vascular tears, and lung injuries. There have only been a handfull of isolated 1st rib fractures reported in athletes. Some of these are actually not caused by direct impact, but occur as a stress fracture over time with excessive muscle traction on the rib or a sudden violent contraction of the attached.......in the case of the 1st rib, this would most likely be the scalenus muscle (the diagonal muscle attaching to the top of the 1st rib in the diagram below).



Fortunately, the athlete form of this injury is virtually never accompanied by the dreaded major vascular and lung injuries. This type of injury in the athlete is another example of a "perfect storm".......a very focused force delivered to a very small area that circumvents the protection of this structure in order for it to occur, and thus reinjury is unlikely. However, it is quite painful with any movement of the shoulder or pressure applied to the sternum. This can be expected to be a 4-6 week recovery, possibly longer if there are other structures involved that involved that are not being revealed.
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