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Old 10-11-2013   #8
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: MRSA virus going around Bucs locker room — Sunday's game could be in doubt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinny View Post
I don't see why you can't disinfect all the uniforms and equipment, lockers, storage and make sure the players are not infected....or am I missing something here? Honest question. I know mrsa is some evil stuff.

First of all, MRSA is NOT A VIRUS.

MRSA can spread not just during onfield activities but by bumping together in locker rooms, by sharing towels and practice jerseys or even by using light switches after an infected person does. It is spread by personal contact by an infected person as well as surfaces contaminated by contact by an infected person. Facilities may be surface "disinfected." Bodies and clothes can be washed.

It is actually extremely uncommon for MRSA to infect body parts that are covered by a uniform, shoes or helmet. If you have something on your face or shoulders or back, anywhere that’s covered, there is less risk of transmission. However, the problem is that MRSA commonly begins or finds its way to arms or hands, so it can auto-inoculate all over your body just by touch, even if you washed an hour ago. Once hands and arms are re-innoculated, it is open season on depositing MRSA on any other player or any other surface you touch (which includes another player's mask, jersey, etc) which in turn can transmit to any player that makes contact with it. And sweat isn't just a gross nuisance, it's a potential Petri dish of deadly bacteria. When you're in a game, you aren't going to wash yourself every few plays. The problem is multi-fold when you are dealing with NFL players in that their bodies are usually covered with small cuts and abrasions in exposed areas..........each of these essentially openings in the body acting as big welcoming mats for the MRSA bug.
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