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Old 10-03-2013   #1006
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: All Encompassing Matt Schaub Thread

Lest anyone has already forgotten, from the very beginnings as a Texan, Schaub was always specifically highly touted for his excellent foot work and mechanics.........especially under pressure............now all of a sudden since the end of last season, out the clear blue.........he's a CLUTZ?

Some seem to be focused only on the apparent final position of his feet, when there are many more aspects to having a residual Lisfranc problem.

When you are familiar with the anatomy and the mechanics of the foot, you can understand what can easily be concealed from common observation within a shoe. To begin with, the concept of the HEEL being mainly responsible for ABSORBTION OF IMPACT and the BALL OF THE FOOT being the main force for PROPULSION and CONTROL.



When a QB pushes off the BACK FOOT, the ball of the foot controls the propulsion (strength of push off) AND the control (the direction of the propulsion). This action places maximal forces/stress on the Lisfranc joint.
The FRONT FOOT then gives BALANCE and facilitates ACCURACY.

Now let's go back to my statement that things can be concealed from common observation with a shoe on. Simply place a tiny pebble under the ball of your foot before tying up your shoe laces. You will notice that you will universally try to avoid the discomfort by slightly shifting your weight, maybe a little to one side, or maybe to another side, in addition to always shifting some of that weight off of the ball onto the heel........though not grossly evident in the display of a repositioning of your foot. In doing so as a QB you are definitely going to be disrupting every aspect of your mechanics. For a while, he can try to compensate and perform adequately through short periods of time, but it will eventually lead to repeated progressive disruption. You may certainly still be able to swivel hips, but this can be performed with subtle shifting weight to the heel, which alleviates stress on the Lisfranc joint. The ability to quickly change direction and move backward, forward, to either side, or even stop abruptly is all effected with subtle shifting of weight to the heel.

What most don't realize is that every time your foot lifts off the ground, you use around 60 bones and 50 muscle groups just to keep you balanced and upright. And that is why some of the slightest foot problems can single-handedly destroy the consistency of all of a QB's mechanics. Schaub hasn't just inexplicably become old, stupid, blind and a "clutz".........with or without pressure. He needs two good feet to successfully consistently complete all of those things he could routinely complete in the past. But his foot does not listen so well anymore to what his brain is trying to tell it to do.

If I were retired and had the time, I could probably write a book on this subject here and in all probability still not satisfy many as to the mechanical implications of such an injury. But I am not retired and don't have the time, and so I'll leave those that may still wish to believe their lying eyes to continue to live in hope.
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