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Old 09-16-2013   #26
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Default Re: What is status of D Brown

Quote:
Originally Posted by CretorFrigg View Post
Don't those take like 4+ weeks to heal??
All depends on how severe.



Typically a player with a grade 1 sprain may finish the game or practice and report pain in the MTP (metatarsal phalangeal) joint (2nd big toe joint), but may not recall the exact play during which the injury occurred. Diagnosis is usually supported by mild to moderate tenderness upon palpation of the plantar aspect of the MTP joint and pain with passive terminal dorsiflexion of the joint. Weight bearing is usually tolerable and swelling minimal.

Treatment of turf toe in football is dependent on the grade and severity of the hyperextension injury. The successful nonoperative treatment of turf toe injuries is well documented. Athletes with grade 1 tendon injuries often miss little or no playing time. These athletes are later treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). Immobilization is rarely necessary. Athletes can often return to play with a combination of “turf toe taping,” shoe wear modification, or application of a more rigid insole (so that the big toe can't bend upwards further tear the undersurface tendon.

A player with a grade 2 turf toe injury presents with swelling and pain during weight bearing and often guard against passive dorsiflexion. They can many times be shot up, taped, given an unyielding insole, and returned to finish the game. The typical football player with a grade 2 turf toe injury may or may not be placed in a boot for just a couple of days, then treated with the same regimen as for grade1 (except longer) and will miss one to two weeks of competition but may have persistent symptoms during games or practice upon returning to play.

Since in a grade 2 injury the player will definitely know when it happened, I suspect that Brown sustained this type of injury. But they may try to have him "rub some dirt on it" and shoot him up and try to treat him as a grade 1. I hope this is not the case and he has only a grade 1. Even with a grade 1, they need to give him at least a couple of days of rest from practice. Of course, we'll see.

I would rule out grade 3 (complete tear) in Brown, as this is an excruciatingly painful injury that you cannot be shot up and return. This injury typically takes 4-6 weeks to heal....if it heals at all. If it doesn't, surgery is necessary, leading to a good 3-4 month rehab.
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