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Old 08-23-2013   #597
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: 1st Round- DeAndre Hopkins WR Texans

As I previously posted before. This is not Hopkins' first concussion. Most are not aware that he sustained a concussion during an auto accident the end of 2011, just before the Orange Bowl. The handful of media that did report it, reported it as a "mild" concussion. They should have done a better job of investigating the incident. Despite the fact that he was allowed to play in the Bowl game within a week of the injury and did well, he did NOT sustain a "minor" concussion...........he sustained full loss of consciousness. Here is the eye witness account by his own receivers coach, Jeff Scott.

Quote:
Jeff Scott remembers the morning of Dec. 27, 2011 well.

All too well.

Scott, along with his wife Sara, was heading to Memorial Stadium to meet up with the rest of team. They were going to meet, pack up the buses, and head on the road to the 2012 Orange Bowl in Miami to face West Virginia.

That’s when the Clemson wide receivers coach saw a car crashed on the side of the highway.

That car belonged to then-sophomore receiver DeAndre Hopkins.

Scott and his wife were on a frontage road when they recognized the car to be Hopkins’ and they “got around there pretty quick” to arrive on the scene.

Scott got out of his car and braced himself for the worst possible news. After all, he didn’t know the severity of the accident. He didn’t know if Hopkins was hurt, or even worse, dead.

“When we got out of the car, the police detective was walking up to the car and it was one of those moments you don’t know what he’s about to tell you,” Scott said during a phone interview on Friday afternoon. “He told us he was OK. He was just really fortunate to be alive. It was definitely just a scary moment for all of us.”

And Hopkins was relatively fine. Scott said the policeman told him Hopkins was knocked unconscious but would be OK. Scott said the tires on the receiver’s car were worn too thin and he happened to hit a wet patch on the road. It was raining that morning, he recalled.
The sad thing is that the NCAA to this day, despite all the NFL emphasis and rules and protocols established for concussed players, does not have nor follow a truly standardized protocol for return to play. And if they had had one, there would have been no way the a player that had been totally knocked unconscious would have been allowed to play that early.............whether the concussion was sustained on the field or otherwise.

No matter how one wants to look at it, this is Hopkins' SECOND significant concussion, and he thus carries a 2-4 times chance of sustaining a third.
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