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Old 08-18-2013   #3
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: Arian Foster's Week 1 availability in doubt?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Heath Shuler View Post
http://www.rotoworld.com/headlines/n...medium=twitter






With the info coming from Kubiak and company I never know what to think.
I've been saying all along that I've been suspect of the claims of simple back muscle spasms. Research has not shown that local injections are effective in controlling acute or chronic low back pain that does not spread down the leg. Therefore, I would have to take it that it was not the injections that caused the pain in the legs. And, furthermore, if both legs are involved, you would have to deduct that it is something that affects spinal nerve roots coming out of both sides of the intervertebral spaces. This would have to be caused by a disc-related problem....and his injections were probably not into the muscles, but epidural in target.



If this is, indeed, a disc, the safe return to play may not be anytime soon. A recent 2011 study reconfirmed the short-term outcome of conservative treatment in athletes with symptomatic lumbar disc herniation in terms of the ability of the athletes to return to play and factors influencing their return to play after conservative treatment. Of 100 athletes with symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, 79.0% returned to play at an average of 4.8 months (range 1–12 months) after the start of treatment and were able to sustain the activities for at least 6 months. The severity of the symptoms prior to the start of treatment was the only factor influencing the ability of the athletes to return to play. Keep in mind that if injections fail, surgery is the next option.
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