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Old 04-19-2013   #25
mussop
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Default Re: The Wonder(lic) of top WR prospects and other pass catcher tidbits

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pencil Neck View Post
For me, it's like most other things, you have to have a certain minimum level of something.

To be a musician, you have to have a certain minimal level of skill. Anything over that level of skill is gravy but it's not going to make you any more successful. But below that minimal level of skill and you can't play well enough for people to get past how bad you suck.

With a football player, he's got to have some minimal level of intelligence depending on the position he plays and the demands of his particular team's playbook. In some offenses, a WR can have a <10 Wonderlic score and I'm not going to be worried about it; in ours, I want him to be smarter than that.

With a QB, if he's got a <10 wonderlic, I'm not expecting him to be able to be successful at all. But anything over a 10-13 and he's probably OK. BUt if he's WAY over that, it's just like the musician thing, it's probably not going to make him any more successful because his brain's ability to learn and do basic processing is no longer his limiting attribute.

The wonder lick is a wast of time when it comes to the NFL.

Dr. Brian Hoffman co-authored a 2009 study with Brian D. Lyons in collaboration with California State University (Fresno) and Towson University. The Lyons Study was presented at the 20th and 21st annual Meetings of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. This 43-page study of 762 NFL players over three draft classes comes to two distinct conclusions:

1) NFL performance on the football field was only found to have a statistically significant correlation with Wonderlic scores among two positions: Tight end and defensive back. Correlations were statistically negligible across all other positions. (Yes, even QB.) In other words, with the exception of TEs and DBs, a player's Wonderlic score (high or low) gave no predictable projection for their eventual productivity as an NFL player. It was worthless.

2)Tight ends and defensive backs showed a (significant) negative correlation.
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