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Old 03-19-2013   #6
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: Recovering Texans

Quote:
Originally Posted by Playoffs View Post
So Doc, quick rundown on how serious that is & what the recovery & longer term ramifications are? When you have the time.
Newton must have had a problem with the knee for sometime. He was out for game 13 and 14 with a “knee.” Looking at this with today’s information, Newton had an inflammation of the patellar tendon (chronic patellar tendonitis) with possible small tendon tears already at that time and evidently tried to play through it until he no longer could. He was treated conservatively with rest.......2 weeks is very short to expect this type of problem to resolve. When the knee pain became “manageable” again, since the Texans were down to almost nothing with the T position, he was evidently put out there again to try to finish out the year. He did. But evidently in doing so, developed major tears from the continued inflammation and weakening of the continually traumatized tendon. Such a case would no longer be appropriate for conservative management, and especially in an NFL player would require surgical repair in order to return and remain on the field with any semblance of production.

A study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine in November. 2011 Patellar tendon ruptures in National Football League players reveal some potentially important trends.

*Twenty-four ruptures of the patellar tendon in 22 National Football League (NFL) players were identified from 1994 through 2004. Team physicians retrospectively reviewed training room and clinic records, operative notes, and imaging studies for each of these players. Player game statistics and draft status were analyzed to identify return to play predictors. A successful outcome was defined as participating in 1 regular-season NFL game.

*Eleven of the 24 injuries had antecedent symptoms.

*Three of the 24 cases had a concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury.

*In 19 of the 24 injuries, the player returned to participate in at least 1 game in the NFL.

*Players who returned were drafted, on average, in the fourth round, while those who failed to return to play were drafted, on average, in the sixth round.

*Of those players who returned to play, the average number of games played was 45.4, with a range of 1 to 142 games.

*Professional football players with isolated rupture of the patellar tendon treated with TIMELY surgical repair will return to their sport.

*It should be known that in general, patients who require this type of surgery do better if the repair is performed early after the injury. Early repair may prevent the tendon from scarring and tightening in a shortened position, leading to compromised return of knee flexion and/or quadriceps strength.
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