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Old 01-19-2013   #22
Texans_Chick
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Default Re: 2012 Texans Year in Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by CloakNNNdagger View Post
Keep in mind that in the case of the Lisfranc injury (and, moreso, in Schaubís case of a Lisfranc fracture injury), ~25% that are surgically repaired will develop progressive arthritis as quickly as only several months to years. A certain percentage will go on to require fusion of the joint to control the pain.....some sooner than later. And these numbers do not come from the professional athlete pool......i.e., one that would require much higher demands on a foot than the regular Joe.

Turning specific attention to Schaub, you will anymore hardly see him square up and point to his target with his left foot, both observations very consistent with avoiding full weight for balance stabilization off of his right back foot.

And for anyone that may say that they havenít noticed any limp, and therefore there is nothing wrong with his foot. You can have significant discomfort or ďinstabilityĒ of the Lisfranc back foot when severely stressed momentarily, like planting and pushing off, and still not limp when walking or gingerly running. The momentary acute stress on the back foot alone or the anticipation of it being painful is enough to affect all aspects of Schaubís game......including strength of throw, accuracy of throw (long, short or wide), ability to acutely side step to the left or step up (push off) in the pocket, or bootleg, QB sneak or play action to the left (try to find the last time Schaub ran one to the left).
I am certain the Texans knew of the risks when they re-signed.

Other notes:

Interestingly, Schaub never showed up on injury reports during the last part of the season when he was struggling. Even after the Detroit game, where it looked like the majority of the team was there. And after Schaub took some shots, including that one that was in my blog post link, where Suh pulled down Schaub with all his weight, and Schaub's knees went a little in the direction that knees aren't supposed to go. He kept throwing after that, didn't notice anything particularly odd about footwork, but often you don't feel stuff until post-game.

I saw Schaub's rehab on a side field doing agility drills before the season. Doing drills I looked specifically how he was moving. There were other players who I didn't think would be ready for the season who weren't--Hartmann, Sharpton, but Schaub looked surprisingly spry for a tall guy.

We can speculate all we want, and you just never know. Though he isn't the same player, I'm surprised Dunta Robinson is as functional as he is despite his injury.

What we do know for a fact is that whatever the Texans are thinking in-house about the future of the QB position is likely going to be staying in-house. There's no benefit to undermining him publicly.

FWIW, he's golfing OK with the boys.
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