View Single Post
Old 01-09-2013   #100
CloakNNNdagger
Hall of Fame
 
CloakNNNdagger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15,775
Rep Power: 197411 CloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Cowboys .. NT Manslaughter

In this and other thread, we’ve spoken about drinking and its effects. I just wanted to bring up some additional info as relates to “size” of an involved individual.

There is a deeply ingrained misconception about a large person, such as Brent always being able to drink more than a smaller person before exhibiting the effects of alcohol, or the level of effect, as well as how long the effects can last.

Yes, there will be some difference based on the total volume of blood in a small vs large person, and therefore some ability to dilute the alcohol somewhat in the larger person....not much of a factor when comparing a 200 pounder to a 300 pounder.

BUT

Body fat content is a commonly overlooked major factor in inebriation and length of inebriation. Body fat doesn’t absorb alcohol. Therefore a person with higher body fat is going to have a higher BAC than a person who has less body fat. Since body fat cannot absorb alcohol, it instead forces the alcohol to remain in the bloodstream until the liver can break it down. The liver can only break down about one alcoholic drink per hour. The longer the alcohol remains in a person’s bloodstream, the longer they will feel inebriated.

Women tend to have a higher BAC than men do. This is because women have a higher percentage of body fat and a smaller amount of an enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase that helps break down alcohol. Women also have less blood than men do because they are usually smaller in size.

Tolerance for alcohol seemed a lot higher when you are 21. The longer it took the inevitably feel the affects of alcohol, the more alcohol you probably consumed. Body fat tends to increase with age and enzyme action tends to slow down as a person gets older. And, again, body fat doesn’t absorb alcohol and the more body fat a person has, the higher their BAC will be and the more and longer he stays inebriated.

Also, as an aside, if a person is stressed or angry, they are likely to have a higher BAC than a person who is calm. When a person is under stress or is upset, their body tends to divert blood away from the stomach and small intestines, and instead moves it to the muscles. The reduced blood flow slows down the absorption of alcohol into the bloodstream. The angry or stressed person might not feel the affects of the alcohol immediately and continue drinking. As soon as the person calms down and the blood flow returns to the stomach, the person could experience a sudden increase in their BAC.
CloakNNNdagger is offline   Reply With Quote