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Old 12-27-2012   #72
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: MY MOMs... Back in the hospital

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texan_Bill View Post
Moms went to Methodist Emergency Room early this morning.

I didn't get news until mid-afternoon. Apparently she has a signicant blood clot in her right arm. They had no pulse at her wrist on the right side.

Doctors are worried about how to remove it and which way they will "go in"... Apparently if they go in the "wrong way" the clot could travel its (evil, effed up way) to her brain, (i.e. stroke).

In addition to that, it looks like she'll have to undergo another bi-pass... On the upside, they said they wouldn't be using pig veins this time...
If the left arm (left subclavian artery) were involved, there would be very little chance that the brain would be involved. However, the right arm (right subclavian) artery has a different anatomy........one that comes off from a common source as the right common carotid artery (that leads to the brain). This common source is called the brachiocephalic artery. I evidently don't know all the details of your mom's case, but one of the most common causes of arterial embolism to the right arm are actually clots that originate in the left ventricular heart chamber secondary to a uninterrupted cardiac irregular heartbeat such as atrial fibrillation) and breaks off to travel there through a straight shot upwards.

If circulation is totally acutely blocked (as seems to be the case) to the right arm, blood thinners alone are inappropriate and there is no choice but to enter the right subclavian artery surgically directly by opening the artery or indirectly via threading an arterial catheter in order to remove the embolus.



Bill, call me and I'll try to answer any questions you may have.

Prayers are with you and your Mom.
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