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Old 10-27-2012   #22
Wolf
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Default Re: Texans version of the WCO

Quote:
Originally Posted by 76Texan View Post
It seems a lot of people credited Alex Gibbs with the ZBS and WCO marriage.
Take this article for example:
http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/...s-running-game


But I don't think we can be sure of that.
If you're interested I can provide some links for you to read up on and come up with your own conclusion.

As far as Kubiak offense, I think it's an evolution from the Broncos scheme.
I have several Broncos games from 2007 that I can review.
I had watched 3 so far, but I'd like to review some more to have a better idea.

Basically, it looks to me like: more formations, more motions, more ways for receivers to block, more play-action.
They combine to make a more complex offense.

Obviously, the Redskins are incorporating a bunch of zone reads (Baylor/Art Briles) into their play action pass and run such that they are quite different from us nowadays.

Quote:
In his first two seasons in Houston, Kubiak's Texans went 14-18. For his third year, Kubiak brought on Gibbs to orchestrate the running game. Gibbs is gone now he left Houston after a couple of seasons, then briefly joined Pete Carroll's staff in Seattle before retiring but the Texans still use the Gibbs formula, which has been good enough to give them the second-best rushing attack in the league this season. What was Gibbs' magic and how can the Texans use it to make a playoff run, even with the NFL equivalent of John Q. Public at quarterback?

The key to Gibbs' zone running game is that the foundational play is the outside zone (the "wide zone," in Gibbs' terminology), not the more common inside zone. The inside zone is a "vertical push" play that aims to move the defense backward and have a running back carry the ball forward with a full head of steam to get yards. The outside zone is more about lateral movement. Each blocker first steps to the side rather than forward (and many coaches teach their linemen to take their first step backward, a technique referred to as "losing ground to gain ground"). The blockers then try to pin defenders to the inside or if they can't do that, drive them to the sideline. Sometimes on these plays, the running back runs around the edge on a traditional-looking sweep. More often, the defense is stretched to its limit and the runner hits a crease and then sprints straight toward the end zone. When executed correctly, it's extremely taxing on the defense, as all of their instincts aggressiveness to the ball carrier and fast pursuit work against them, and linemen without great size or talent can open huge holes through excellent technique and discipline.

But if it's so good, why doesn't every NFL team use it? The answer is the same reason that, despite his legendary status, Gibbs has never lasted too long in one job. Gibbs' style of zone blocking requires total commitment by every offensive player linemen must be perfect technicians, not just fat guys who push others around; runners must make reads and make "one-cut-and-go" plays rather than juke and tap dance like the next Barry Sanders; and quarterbacks and receivers can't treat runs as mini-breaks because they're expected to execute assignments and make blocks. The offense is also taxing on coaches. Gibbs will tell anyone willing to listen that if you want to be good at the wide zone and the tight zone, throw out all of your other run plays. All those wonderful Power O plays, Counter Trey plays, and whatever other fancy stuff you think you need get rid of it. Instead, run two yes, two run plays, and run them against every defensive front you face until you get really good at them. To Gibbs, anything else is hubris.1
Interesting read. Thanks MSR
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