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Old 10-27-2012   #16
CloakNNNdagger
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Default Re: Cushing's Surgery Went Well

Quote:
Originally Posted by IDEXAN View Post
Keep in mind that not all ACL injuries reflect the same level of trauma. Approximately only 1/3rd are solitary injuries, where as 2/3rd are accompanied by a combination of tears to the medial or lateral collateral ligaments, and/or medial or lateral menisci.
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And I've not read or heard any reports that Cushing had any damage/injury to the medial or lateral collateral ligaments ? So if this is the case and Cushing is in the "1/3rd solitary injury" category this would seem to improve his chances for a successful and full recovery ?
Experience has shown that teams usually freely report the major damage to the ACL but seldom include the full extent of "collateral damage." There is one aspect of Cushing's situation that would have me concerned over the "typical" ACL injury..........and that is the mechanism involved leading to the injury.

The "typical" mechanism involves NON-CONTACT. In fact 80% of all ACL tears fall under this category. Cushing's involved CONTACT. In other words, the violent active unnatural external forces he experienced compliments of Matt Slauson very likely would have applied significant additional stresses to his knee joint, thus encouraging more distraction and displacement of the femur and tibia which make up the knee joint than would have occurred with the more limiting passive forces seen in a non-contact injury...........thus more damage to other supportive ligaments (MCL, LCL, PCL) and cartilaginous structures (medial meniscus, lateral meniscus).
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