View Single Post
Old 10-17-2012   #56
CloakNNNdagger
Hall of Fame
 
CloakNNNdagger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15,339
Rep Power: 164009 CloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respectedCloakNNNdagger is a quality contributor and well respected
Default Re: Right Guard: It's On

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pencil Neck View Post
I think it's the team doctors doing the test. They definitely do the first test because that's on the sideline. The second test might be done by someone else. When Kubiak was talking about it, it sounded like the day the test was done was dependent on someone else's schedule.
One reason that I feel that this is mostly show is that actually the trainers are allowed to assess (not diagnose or make final recommendations) on the field and transmit their "findings" by phone to doctors. No neurologists are involved. If they are removed from the game, they can return to play with more stringent criteria.

Re. RG III:
Quote:
“He seemed fine, seemed in good spirits. He appeared to be doing well,” Cousins said.

Griffin was scheduled to see an independent neurologist Monday evening. If he passes tests administered by that physician, he would be evaluated on a treadmill and do other physical work Tuesday, Shanahan said.

Before he can receive clearance to play, Griffin must pass neurological tests administered both by team doctors and an independent neurosurgeon, and must demonstrate that he can exercise at game-level exertion without a recurrence of concussion symptoms, according to Thom Mayer, medical director of the NFL Players Association.

The neuropsychological evaluation typically includes elements that measure reaction time and shape recognition, Mayer said. Many NFL teams use the computerized ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) test, Mayer said. To pass, Griffin would have to achieve results comparable to his baseline results from previous testing. Shanahan was unsure whether the Redskins employ the computerized testing system.

According to the ImPACT Web site, the test measures “verbal and visual memory, processing speed and reaction time.” Reaction time is measured to a hundredth of a second. The test, which takes approximately 20 minutes, measures aspects of cognitive functioning that include attention span, working memory, sustained and selective attention time, non-verbal problem-solving and reaction time.

Shanahan expressed optimism that Griffin would be able to play Sunday. But the coach said it is possible for the quarterback to suffer a setback in coming days that could prevent him from playing.
link

An initial evaluation re. a possible concussion by a neurologist vs a trainer/medical staff may be very more complete with more cautious approach to removal from the game. The problem is that there can be "skip" times where symptoms can be absent or quickly leave and come back over long periods of time. The subsequent evaluation following the player being permanently pulled from a game will be performed by a neurologist plus the medical staff . Most "independent" neurologists would feel pretty uncomfortable to allow a private patient to return the next week/game, even if the patient is symptom free during that week.

There is definitely a reason why the NFL and the NFLPA do not want a board-certified neurologist on the sidelines. There would be more players forced to leave the field........and stay off the field.
CloakNNNdagger is offline   Reply With Quote