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Old 09-25-2012   #30
paycheck71
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Default Re: Houston Texans: Unanimous #1 in NFL.com Power Rankings

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCOTTexans View Post
Nope... but that would be nice
Don't know how accurate the wiki page is, but FWIW

LINK

Quote:
Local simulcasting of cable games
To maximize TV ratings, as well as to protect the NFL's ability to sell TV rights collectively, games televised on ESPN or the NFL Network are simulcast on a local broadcast station in each of the primary markets of both teams (the Green Bay Packers have two primary markets, Green Bay and Milwaukee, a remnant of when they played some home games in Milwaukee each season, see below). This station does not need to have affiliate connections with a national broadcaster of NFL games. Stations who are the affiliates of MyNetworkTV or The CW (and, in at least one case, an independent station[22]) have out bid more established local broadcasters in some markets. However, the home team's market must be completely served by the station and that broadcast can only air if the game is sold out within 72 hours of kick-off (see below).
On November 8, 1987, the very first NFL game ever aired on ESPN was played between the New England Patriots and New York Giants. Technically, the game was only simulcast in the Boston market, with a separate broadcast produced for the New York market by ESPN sister property WABC-TV at the time, WABC's union contract prohibited non-union workers (like those of ESPN) from working on live events broadcast on the station. This marked the only time since the AFL-NFL merger that a regular season game was locally produced for TV. The WABC broadcast featured WABC's own Corey McPherrin doing play-by-play, and Frank Gifford and Lynn Swann from Monday Night Football doing color commentary.
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