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HOU-TEX
05-02-2012, 01:21 PM
There's actually a report by TMZ saying Seau's been shot and possibly dead. However, I didn't quote TMZ due to them being full of crap most of the time.

OCEANSIDE — Oceanside police are responding to a report of a shooting at the beachfront home of former Chargers star Junior Seau Wednesday.

A 911 call reporting a possible suicide was made to police at 10 a.m., a dispatcher said.

A crowd including several police officers and neighbors has gathered outside Seau’s two-story home on the south end of The Strand.

No further details were immediately available.

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/may/02/report-of-shooting-at-seaus-home/

Texan_Bill
05-02-2012, 01:24 PM
There's actually a report by TMZ saying Seau's been shot and possibly dead. However, I didn't quote TMZ due to them being full of crap most of the time.



http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/may/02/report-of-shooting-at-seaus-home/

Just heard this on the radio... They dont really have much in the way of details, yet.

Texan_Bill
05-02-2012, 01:24 PM
There's actually a report by TMZ saying Seau's been shot and possibly dead. However, I didn't quote TMZ due to them being full of crap most of the time.



http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/may/02/report-of-shooting-at-seaus-home/

Actually, on stories like this TMZ generally gets it right.

Section516
05-02-2012, 01:28 PM
On May 2nd, 2012, Oceanside police responded to reports of a shot fired at Seau's home there. A witness reported hearing from the police that Seau committed suicide. [19]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junior_Seau

Wiki=official..

/sarcasm

Rey
05-02-2012, 01:29 PM
Actually, on stories like this TMZ generally gets it right.


That's what I was going to say. They are pretty accurate when it comes to reporting news...

NitroGSXR
05-02-2012, 01:31 PM
RIP Junior Seau. You will not be forgotten.

HOU-TEX
05-02-2012, 01:31 PM
I hope it wasn't a suicide. I can't stand that

Section516
05-02-2012, 01:34 PM
http://www.10news.com/news/30993007/detail.html

Oceanside Police confirmed that something is going on in the area of Seau's home in the 600 block of South The Strand but would not give details other than to say further information is coming.

A neighbor who spoke with police told 10News that when he asked what was going on at the house, authorities said Seau shot himself. The medical examiner's office confirmed that they were headed to Oceanside but would not give the address.

Pastor Miles McPherson of The Rock church told 10News' Kimberly Hunt that he is headed to the home to be with Junior Seau's family.

A witness told 10News that police responded with a large presence at the location at about 10 a.m. and closed the roadway. The witness also told 10News that a gunshot was heard inside Seau's home.

SAN DIEGO -- Oceanside Police have apparently responded to Junior Seau's home on South The Strand in Oceanside. The Chargers Hall Of Famer killed himself, a witness who heard the news from police told 10News.

HoustonFrog
05-02-2012, 01:36 PM
He drove his car off a cliff right up the road from there another time. I right away to start to wonder if he has the same brain injuries we keep hearing about and thus these events?

Section516
05-02-2012, 01:38 PM
Pro football great and Oceanside sports legend Junior Seau has apparently committed suicide, found by a housekeeper with a gunshot wound to the chest, according to multiple sources.

http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/oceanside/article_bccb943a-ba7e-56f3-8756-13d9c81a8258.html#.T6F8JvZORWs.twitter

Looks legit. Suicide. Sad day.

The1ApplePie
05-02-2012, 01:39 PM
He drove his car off a cliff right up the road from there another time. I right away to start to wonder if he has the same brain injuries we keep hearing about and thus these events?

He was going through personal problems when he did the cliff thing. Beat up his girlfriend or something before doing it.

The Pencil Neck
05-02-2012, 01:41 PM
Wow. That's so sad.

HoustonFrog
05-02-2012, 01:41 PM
Pro football great and Oceanside sports legend Junior Seau has apparently committed suicide, found by a housekeeper with a gunshot wound to the chest, according to multiple sources.

http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/oceanside/article_bccb943a-ba7e-56f3-8756-13d9c81a8258.html#.T6F8JvZORWs.twitter

Looks legit. Suicide. Sad day.

He was going through personal problems when he did the cliff thing. Beat up his girlfriend or something before doing it.

Shot in chest just like Duerson. I am thinking brain injury issues.

1Apple...maybe his anger and control issues were too much to handle if he had the damage getting worse.

HOU-TEX
05-02-2012, 01:42 PM
Who the hell shoots themself in the chest attempting suicide? Unless he's wanted to use his brain for concussion investigating purposes?

North County Times reporting Seau "found dead by a housekeeper of a gunshot wound to the chest."

Texan_Bill
05-02-2012, 01:43 PM
That's what I was going to say. They are pretty accurate when it comes to reporting news...

Better than the mainstream media outlets.

Texan_Bill
05-02-2012, 01:44 PM
Who the hell shoots themself in the chest attempting suicide? Unless he's wanted to use his brain for concussion investigating purposes?

Maybe he left a note similar to Dave Duerson (sp?) and they haven't found it yet(?)

The1ApplePie
05-02-2012, 01:44 PM
Who the hell shoots themself in the chest attempting suicide? Unless he's wanted to use his brain for concussion investigating purposes?

Women mostly shoot themselves in the chest because they don't want their faces messed up.

Yeah, kind of sounds like a brain injury deal. Unless Junior just really wanted an open casket funeral.

The Pencil Neck
05-02-2012, 01:44 PM
Yeah, the whole chest thing kinda freaks me out. I mean, you want to hit the lower part of the brain stem so that it's instantaneous. Anything else and you remain at least partially conscious while you die. That's not something I want to be.

Khari
05-02-2012, 01:44 PM
Chest seems odd choice for a suicide...how common is that...

HOU-TEX
05-02-2012, 01:46 PM
Yeah, the whole chest thing kinda freaks me out. I mean, you want to hit the lower part of the brain stem so that it's instantaneous. Anything else and you remain at least partially conscious while you die. That's not something I want to be.

**Reminds self to never piss PN off**

HoustonFrog
05-02-2012, 01:47 PM
Chest seems odd choice for a suicide...how common is that...

If you want people to study your damaged brain like Duerson

The1ApplePie
05-02-2012, 01:47 PM
Chest seems odd choice for a suicide...how common is that...

Very common in women, not so much in men.

Playoffs
05-02-2012, 01:47 PM
Chest seems odd choice for a suicide...how common is that...Less common, but happens. Had a college buddy who did it that way.

RIP Junior Seau. :(

Malloy
05-02-2012, 02:10 PM
Someone died and that's a tragedy.

Rest in peace Sir :(

Section516
05-02-2012, 02:11 PM
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d828d07bd/article/junior-seau-dead-at-43-after-reports-of-shooting-at-home?module=HP11_breaking_news

The San Diego Chargers have confirmed former LB Junior Seau has died at 43; multiple reports say there was a shooting at his home. Multiple reports said there was a shooting at his Oceanside, Calif. home.

The details of the shooting were not immediately released.

Seau, 43, ended his career in 2009, after playing 20 years in the NFL -- 13 in San Diego, three in Miami and four in New England. he was selected to 12 Pro Bowls and was named first-team All-Pro six times.

Seau was a graduate of Oceanside High School. He was drafted fifth overall out of USC by the Chargers in 1990.

DownByContact
05-02-2012, 02:15 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-shutdown-corner/report-nfl-legend-junior-seau-dead-182120394.html

Seau is the eighth member of the Chargers 1994 Super Bowl team to pass.

Is this true? pretty eerie.

bckey
05-02-2012, 02:27 PM
Seau was a great player. This is really sad. I just hope Goodell doesn't try and use this to his advantage.

ChampionTexan
05-02-2012, 02:42 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-shutdown-corner/report-nfl-legend-junior-seau-dead-182120394.html


Is this true? pretty eerie.

Shawn Lee (Cardiac Arrest)
David Griggs (Car Accident)
Lewis Bush (Heart attack)
Doug Miller (Lightning strike) (Yeah - Lightning strike)
Rodney Culver (Plane Crash)
Chris Mims (Enlarged heart)
Curtis Whitley (overdose)

And sadly, Junior makes 8.

pirbroke
05-02-2012, 02:49 PM
Shawn Lee (Cardiac Arrest)
David Griggs (Car Accident)
Lewis Bush (Heart attack)
Doug Miller (Lightning strike) (Yeah - Lightning strike)
Rodney Culver (Plane Crash)
Chris Mims (Enlarged heart)
Curtis Whitley (overdose)

And sadly, Junior makes 8.

wow, thats crazy, the mom is on tv now, very very sad, she is asking god to take her, I can hardly watch.

The Pencil Neck
05-02-2012, 03:06 PM
wow, thats crazy, the mom is on tv now, very very sad, she is asking god to take her, I can hardly watch.

That was heartbreaking.

chicagotexan2
05-02-2012, 03:18 PM
That was heartbreaking.

I know, she's devastated. very sad news.

GP
05-02-2012, 03:19 PM
Wrestling and NFL football are losing a lot of people to suicides and heart problems.

Makes me wonder if some of this is less to do with brain injuries and more to do with steroid abuse. Would be interesting to see the breakdown of those kinds of death across the spectrum of NFL, NBA and MLB.

Then again, wrestling (the fake kind) had not only the steroid situation but also their guys are going through concussions just like NFL guys do.

GP
05-02-2012, 03:21 PM
Remember this, everyone, when people say Goodell is "ruining the NFL" by trying to cut down on hits to the head.

What is he supposed to do, just do nothing and let stories like this become a monthly event 10 or 15 years from now?

Porky
05-02-2012, 03:21 PM
I'm not at a TV, but I weep for that Mom. I'm extremely saddened.

I LOVED watching Juinor Seau play football. I can't speak to his character off the field, but on the field, he was everything I would want my son to emulate.

A fierce but fair competitor. He left it all on the field each and every game. Highly resepcted by teammates, fans, and competitors. Great teammate and leader. Got every ounce of talent God gave him and used it every game of his career. He showed great sportmanship and I really think opponents loved him just as much as teammates in that mano E mano kind of way. :handshake:

I think suicide really taints his legacy. That is a losers way out for a guy I always thought of as a winner. I don't know if brain injury played a role or not. I do know that some of these guys live for the adoration and the pure competition and once they lose that, they feel they have nothing left to live for. It's really sad any way you slice it.

RIP Mr. Seau - I hope your soul finds in death what your body, mind and spirit could not in life.

gtexan02
05-02-2012, 03:25 PM
This San Diego Chargers curse is really freaky stuff. The linebacker doug miller was struck by lightning twice. He was camping, got hit by lightning, his friend rushed over to give him CPR and he was struck again later and died. Wow

drs23
05-02-2012, 03:25 PM
Wrestling and NFL football are losing a lot of people to suicides and heart problems.

Makes me wonder if some of this is less to do with brain injuries and more to do with steroid abuse. Would be interesting to see the breakdown of those kinds of death across the spectrum of NFL, NBA and MLB.

Then again, wrestling (the fake kind) had not only the steroid situation but also their guys are going through concussions just like NFL guys do.

That's the first thing that entered my mind. Those are classic after effects are they not? The enlarged heart especially, and the heart attacks.

Can't comment on the wrasslin', either real or imagined. :)

HoustonFrog
05-02-2012, 03:26 PM
Remember this, everyone, when people say Goodell is "ruining the NFL" by trying to cut down on hits to the head.

What is he supposed to do, just do nothing and let stories like this become a monthly event 10 or 15 years from now?

The problem people have with Goodell is that there were studies saying this was a problem 3-4 years before the NFL acted on it and then they try and run out an 18 game schedule. So he can play tough now but they skirted this stuff early on despite studies and then they still want to make money with more games.

Blake
05-02-2012, 03:27 PM
I feel bad for his family who seems heartbroken, but it doesnt bother me. I didnt know the guy or anything.

The Pencil Neck
05-02-2012, 03:32 PM
Wrestling and NFL football are losing a lot of people to suicides and heart problems.

Makes me wonder if some of this is less to do with brain injuries and more to do with steroid abuse. Would be interesting to see the breakdown of those kinds of death across the spectrum of NFL, NBA and MLB.

Then again, wrestling (the fake kind) had not only the steroid situation but also their guys are going through concussions just like NFL guys do.

It's so hard to get real numbers on steroid use. This is one of the reasons I wish that they hadn't been included in the controlled substances act the way they were. I'd prefer for the people are going to use steroids to use them under doctor's supervision and then have records we could actually compile so that we'd know what the various relationships were.

But it's not just steroid use that's the issue. A lot of these guys are doing a lot of other drugs and herbal compounds in an effort to get some sort of edge. And because of the atmosphere surrounding performance enhancing compounds, it's impossible to know who's using what and which of those things they're using are risky.

Because of the lack of physician guidance, these guys could be taking lots of drugs that have adverse interactions between themselves. Some of the drug regimens of these guys (from what I've heard) are very elaborate and much more than just steroids.

The1ApplePie
05-02-2012, 03:57 PM
Wrestling and NFL football are losing a lot of people to suicides and heart problems.

Makes me wonder if some of this is less to do with brain injuries and more to do with steroid abuse. Would be interesting to see the breakdown of those kinds of death across the spectrum of NFL, NBA and MLB.

Then again, wrestling (the fake kind) had not only the steroid situation but also their guys are going through concussions just like NFL guys do.

Benoit's case was laid at the feet of 'roids until it was revealed that concussions left him with a brain that was the equivalent of a 90 yearold with dementia. Once that came out, the story basically dropped from the news cycle because it lost the sexy roid rage appeal.

The heart problems can be linked to roids though.

SheTexan
05-02-2012, 05:12 PM
Committing suicide is THE MOST selfish, self-centered act a person can do! The only people you hurt are the one's that are living, esp family! I have very little sympathy for anyone who does such a thing, I don't care who they are or what excuses people make for them. Regardless of what problems or issues you have, mental or physical, your family does NOT deserve such punishment!!

As for his family, I will definitely say some prayers for them. They are the one's who will have to live everyday with the unanswered questions and the severe pain due to the loss of someone theylove so much. VERY sad day for his family!!

Nawzer
05-02-2012, 05:33 PM
What a sad story. My thoughts go out to the Seau family.

Playoffs
05-02-2012, 06:32 PM
Eric Olsen, Saints offensive lineman...

Eric Olsen ‏ @EOlsen69 Reply Retweet Favorite

Wow this is a tough one.. When I was a frosh in HS Junior Seau worked the Jay Fiedler Football camp and at the end of one of the days he...

Challenged any1 to a 1 on 1. Being one of the 'big' kids, I was volunteered by my buddies and went up in front of the whole camp to face...

This monster of a man. Shaking in my cleats, he gave me a wink before a coach gave the cadence. He let me pancake him. And he sold it too...

I can't even tell you how good I felt at that moment; it changed me forever. The whole camp cheered for me, a chubby kid that didn't know...

If he even liked football. From then on I was addicted. All thanks 2 this 10 time all-pro that felt like making some snot-nosed kid's day...

Doesn't seem like much but it meant a lot to me. Sorry for the essay just had to share. RIP Junior I'll never forget what you did for me.

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2012, 07:02 PM
610 is saying that without a suicide note or a donor permission, no one can examine his brain without permission of his family. Therefore, it doesn't make sense that he shot himself in the chest specifically to leave his brain untouched for trauma evaluation.

Someone should tell these people that the above conclusion makes no sense. Most states require the State medical examiner to complete an autopsy report and many mandate that the autopsy be videotaped for an suspected suicide. Like Texas, California state law requires the coroner to investigate deaths of persons dying from criminal violence, by accident, by suicide, sudden unexpected deaths (without attending physician), any suspicious or unusual manner, or when the decedent is unidentified.

The condition of his brain will be known.

infantrycak
05-02-2012, 07:46 PM
610 is saying that without a suicide note or a donor permission, no one can examine his brain without permission of his family.

Yeah and Rich Lord said the Texans were going to owe $20+ mil for cutting Carr. The radio reporters don't know their own business. Why should they know this?

Hervoyel
05-02-2012, 08:49 PM
I've never been a big Seau fan and I can't put my finger on why. His intensity and talent are undeniable. I just never cared much about him one way or the other. I'm sorry he felt the need to do this and maybe it did have something to do with brain damage.

I'll give him props for doing the one thing that really matters to me about suicides. He went alone. If you absolutely must take your own life then alone is the only way to go. Can't stand people who take others with them out of fear or anger.

Lucky
05-02-2012, 09:04 PM
I don't know a lot about Junior Seau the person, or what he was going through in his life. I'm not really comfortable speculating on what led him to this tragic decision. What I can speak to is how great a football player Junior Seau was.

If I were able to select 3 linebackers from any era to put on my all time team, they would be Lawrence Taylor, Ray Lewis, and Junior Seau. They each brought different elements of skill to the game. But, they all shared one trait: a burning intensity that transferred to the rest of their teammates.

I once saw Junior Seau practically beat the run & shoot Oilers single-handedly. He was able to pressure Warren Moon on one play, then drop back into coverage and make an interception the next. The Oilers had no answer for Seau, and he seemed to be inside the Oiler huddle.

Seau put the '94 Chargers on his back, and carried them to the Super Bowl. That team had no business there. There was no one special on offense. No one special on defense (other than Seau). And a very average head coach. But, they had Seau. And that was enough.

The term "great" is tossed around too often in sports. Waters the word down. Junior Seau was a great football player. He stood out every time he took the field. In my opinion, Seau was a Hall of Famer among the the Hall of Famers.

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2012, 09:25 PM
I don't know a lot about Junior Seau the person, or what he was going through in his life. I'm not really comfortable speculating on what led him to this tragic decision. What I can speak to is how great a football player Junior Seau was.

If I were able to select 3 linebackers from any era to put on my all time team, they would be Lawrence Taylor, Ray Lewis, and Junior Seau. They each brought different elements of skill to the game. But, they all shared one trait: a burning intensity that transferred to the rest of their teammates.

I once saw Junior Seau practically beat the run & shoot Oilers single-handedly. He was able to pressure Warren Moon on one play, then drop back into coverage and make an interception the next. The Oilers had no answer for Seau, and he seemed to be inside the Oiler huddle.

Seau put the '94 Chargers on his back, and carried them to the Super Bowl. That team had no business there. There was no one special on offense. No one special on defense (other than Seau). And a very average head coach. But, they had Seau. And that was enough.

The term "great" is tossed around too often in sports. Waters the word down. Junior Seau was a great football player. He stood out every time he took the field. In my opinion, Seau was a Hall of Famer among the the Hall of Famers.

MSR

Has me muster up some very moving thoughts of a man who played as if it were his life.......because it was.

Playoffs
05-02-2012, 10:29 PM
MSRGot him for you.

Texan_Bill
05-02-2012, 10:48 PM
Benoit's case was laid at the feet of 'roids until it was revealed that concussions left him with a brain that was the equivalent of a 90 yearold with dementia. Once that came out, the story basically dropped from the news cycle because it lost the sexy roid rage appeal.

The heart problems can be linked to roids though.

+1.

That's awesome that you brought that up.... Yes, Benoit was an apparent roid user but the relevant part here is that he had sustained significant head trauma as well...

Agree with the heart and roid issue, tho'.

Texan_Bill
05-02-2012, 10:52 PM
Yeah and Rich Lord said the Texans were going to owe $20+ mil for cutting Carr. The radio reporters don't know their own business. Why should they know this?

I would customarily throw out the :spit: smilie (especially if DICK Lord is involved) except for the fact that this isn't funny... At all!!!

The Pencil Neck
05-02-2012, 11:50 PM
+1.

That's awesome that you brought that up.... Yes, Benoit was an apparent roid user but the relevant part here is that he had sustained significant head trauma as well...

Agree with the heart and roid issue, tho'.

Another popular steroid guy is Lyle Alzado who was virulently anti-steroids prior to his death. But from everything I've heard, he actually died from a brain tumor of a type not normally associated with steroid use, and possibly (according to rumor) associated with HIV (which he could have contracted by using dirty needles to shoot up his steroids.) But he was adamant that it was the steroids although he also was known to use a lot of human growth hormone.

SW H-TOWN
05-03-2012, 12:32 AM
wow, thats crazy, the mom is on tv now, very very sad, she is asking god to take her, I can hardly watch.

That really really sucks. I went to a funeral today. My friend died due do complications from a surgery in Panama. They buried her in David but had a service for her in CR. I had to go up to her mom and tell her how sorry I was and the look in her eyes was just horrible. She was inconsolable, weeping...just awful. Now I hear this, poor lady. May God ease her pain.

TheMatrix31
05-03-2012, 03:09 AM
Damn shame for the kids and family.

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2012, 07:34 AM
An autopsy could shed more light on the death -- an examination which may be completed as early as Thursday, the county Medical Examiner's Office said.link (http://www.kpbs.org/news/2012/may/02/police-responding-incident-junior-seaus-house/)

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2012, 07:38 AM
From the ESPN NFC blog.......Thoughts on Junior Seau (http://espn.go.com/blog/nfceast/post/_/id/38844/breakfast-links-thoughts-on-junior-seau)

Junior Seau never played in the NFC East, but if the story of his death Wednesday at the age of 43 didn't shake you up, you're made of stone. Police are investigating the possibility of suicide, and since he died of a gunshot wound to the chest, that possibility recalls former Bears safety Dave Duerson, who shot himself in the chest last year and left messages asking that his brain be studied for evidence that playing football damaged it. We don't know yet of any such message left by Seau. We don't know why he's dead, or if playing football had anything to do with it, and we may never know. A lot of conclusions are being jumped to, and the temptation to make those jumps is understanding, but the fact is that a man is dead, far too young, and the outrage can and should be put on hold while respect is paid.

A few things are clear, though. Seau's story -- the part that came before Wednesday -- indicates a man who struggled with his transition to post-NFL life. Whether that struggle had to do with damage done to him by playing the game remains to be seen and surely debated. But stories such as this one are a major part of the current culture surrounding today's NFL.

The idea that Seau's death might even possibly be fallout from a playing career that took too intense a toll is part of the expanding tapestry of concern that governs the league's actions on such matters as the Saints' bounty scandal. With more than 1,100 former NFL players currently suing the league for allegedly ignoring the long-term effects of head and other injuries suffered during their playing careers, the NFL and commissioner Roger Goodell feel required to take a hard line on player safety. Rules will continue to be changed and modified to address the violence inherent in the game. Suspensions for actions the league believes could result in too-serious injury will continue to be harsh, even extreme, to give the league as strong a base as possible from which to claim it did not turn a blind eye if and when any of these suits ever find their way to a judge.

The NFLPA took some heat Wednesday, in the wake of the announcement of the Saints' suspensions, for not negotiating during the last CBA talks a change in the discipline policy that would have allowed players to appeal to someone other than Goodell. What wasn't mentioned during those discussions were the many concessions the players did win in last year's negotiations -- quality-of-life things like improved post-career health care, injury guarantees in contracts, reductions in the demands made on players during the offseason program and drastic cutbacks in the amount of contact permitted in offseason and training-camp practices. Those are the issues the players believed were most important, because those are the issues that affect them and their families long term, as people, once their short careers are over.

Part of the problem with the NFL is that fans tend to see these players as characters that appear on a weekly TV show, not as real human beings who are willingly subjecting themselves to physical punishment for our entertainment. But when something like Seau's death happens, everybody gets reminded of the reality that lurks behind the noise and the excitement and the bright colors of game day. And while fans may not like these reminders, sadly, they're not going away. They're a part of the game in 2012 and in the future, and they're here to change the way the people who watch and run football think about it. Or else.

ckhouston
05-03-2012, 08:36 AM
Committing suicide is THE MOST selfish, self-centered act a person can do! The only people you hurt are the one's that are living, esp family! I have very little sympathy for anyone who does such a thing, I don't care who they are or what excuses people make for them. Regardless of what problems or issues you have, mental or physical, your family does NOT deserve such punishment!!

Pissed off at a dead person? Really?

Absolutely 100% positive that Junior doesnt care if you "have very little sympathy" for him right now.

Heart goes out to the family.

rolyat93
05-03-2012, 11:40 AM
Thought I would share this here, pretty cool story.

http://i.imgur.com/1U3Ay.png

HoustonFrog
05-03-2012, 11:49 AM
http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/7886162/report-boston-university-seeking-study-junior-seau-brain

Seau died of gunshot wound to the chest Wednesday, and his death is being investigated as a suicide. No conclusive medical connection has been made between head injuries and suicide, but Boston University's Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy has asked to study Seau's brain, Sports Illustrated reported on Thursday.

Gina Seau said her ex-husband did sustain concussions during his nearly 20-year NFL career.

"Of course he had. He always bounced back and kept on playing," she said in a phone interview. "He's a warrior. That didn't stop him. I don't know what football player hasn't. It's not ballet. It's part of the game."

Taylor Twellman, a former soccer star in MLS, was a neighbor of Seau's in Oceanside, Calif. He said Thursday that he told Seau one time that he had suffered a concussion playing soccer and was experiencing bad headaches. Twellman said that Seau admitted that he also suffered from headaches from multiple concussions playing football.

Twellman, who has become an advocate for athletes with brain trauma, said he later tried to reach out to Seau to tell him he should seek help, but Seau never responded.

SheTexan
05-03-2012, 05:21 PM
Pissed off at a dead person? Really?

Absolutely 100% positive that Junior doesnt care if you "have very little sympathy" for him right now.

Heart goes out to the family.

Get a grip!! WHERE did I say I was pissed off at a dead person??!!

Don't try to goad me into an argument, because I will not play childish games with a topic like this. It's much to tragic, and way to sad, esp for his family. My heart goes out to them, esp his Mother. There is NOTHING on the face of this earth more painful than losing your child!! I will keep her in my prayers for a very long time!!

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2012, 07:19 PM
It's official.

Seau's Death Ruled a SuicideBy BERNIE WILSON and ELLIOT SPAGAT Associated Press
SAN DIEGO May 4, 2012 (AP)

Junior Seau's death has been ruled a suicide by the San Diego County medical examiner's office.

An autopsy Thursday confirmed that the former NFL linebacker died of a gunshot wound to the chest, the medical examiner's office said. The office said further details would be released in a final investigative report, which may take up to 90 days to complete.

Officials said they were awaiting a decision by the family on whether to turn over Seau's brain to unidentified outside researchers for study.

ckhouston
05-03-2012, 10:46 PM
Get a grip!! WHERE did I say I was pissed off at a dead person??!!

Don't try to goad me into an argument, because I will not play childish games with a topic like this. It's much to tragic, and way to sad, esp for his family. My heart goes out to them, esp his Mother. There is NOTHING on the face of this earth more painful than losing your child!! I will keep her in my prayers for a very long time!!

Maybe I misinterpreted the tone of your post. Not used to so many exclamation points unless someone is pissed. My bad.

I agree, losing a child would devestate me. My parents have lost two since 2002 and it is unbearable losing two brothers ... cant even begin to fathom their pain losing two sons.

HoustonFrog
05-04-2012, 07:56 AM
Family will allow studies of brain

http://www.latimes.com/sports/sportsnow/la-sp-sn-junior-seau-brain-study-20120503,0,1280862.story

"The family was considering this almost from the beginning, but they didn't want to make any emotional decisions," Mitchell told The Times on Thursday night. "And when they came to a joint decision that absolutely this was the best thing, it was a natural occurrence for the Seau family to go forward."

HOU-TEX
05-04-2012, 09:23 AM
I'm glad they're going to take a gander at his brain. However, the dude played 20 years in the NFL, plus HS? College? Odds are, he'll have a nick or two in his noodle.

Friggin loved watching him as a player, but he made the choice to put in 20 years.

beerlover
05-04-2012, 09:32 AM
I'm not a doctor but believe Seau would still be alive today if he had stayed retired after 2006 season instead of signing another deal with Patriots which lasted next four years. RIP JS

ckhouston
05-04-2012, 10:17 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMe0Rz1frdE

Junior was always a leader, even when "QB's Go Wild".

HoustonFrog
05-04-2012, 11:06 AM
The weird part about CTE, from what I've read, is how some's brain reacts to the hits and then how the damage progresses. The studies have shown that some high school kids who were examined already showed extensive signs while someonme like Duerson had damage that made his brain seem like that of a 80-90 year old. It seems like some avoid it while others get extensive damage.

CloakNNNdagger
05-04-2012, 06:31 PM
The weird part about CTE, from what I've read, is how some's brain reacts to the hits and then how the damage progresses. The studies have shown that some high school kids who were examined already showed extensive signs while someonme like Duerson had damage that made his brain seem like that of a 80-90 year old. It seems like some avoid it while others get extensive damage.


The initial discovery of CTE in football players, alarming as it was, focused on 36- to 50-year-olds with brains resembling 80-year-olds. Then CTE was found in a 21-year-old football player at Penn who committed suicide despite no previous concussion symptoms, plus an 18-year-old multi-sport high school athlete (the youngest to date) who died following a history of multiple concussions.

The concern is magnified because concussion damage is cumulative. Get one and you're at greater risk for another. Plus, developing brains require less impact to suffer concussions and take longer to heal.

Like Alzheimer's disease, CTE has stages dictated by the amount and distribution of an abnormal protein called tau in the brain. In the early stages, the protein tends to cluster around blood vessels, later spreading to other "hotspots" in the brain involved in memory, movement and personality.

As it gets more profound....and this takes decades....then we definitely see changes in memory, emotionality, even rage behavior. The disease continues to progress.... more slowly than Alzheimer's disease -- until patients have dementia, disrupted and unintelligible speech, and uncoordinated movement.

CTs, MRIs, specific markers or blood tests and other sophisticated tools are virtually worthless in identifying this condition. As you follow individuals with the progressive signs and symptoms of what you may suspect is this devastating disease, it still remains a diagnosis of the dead.

CloakNNNdagger
05-04-2012, 06:58 PM
Here us one of the best articles I have come across of any review on helmet history, helmet development, helmet safety and formal helmet safety evaluation/ratings. It's definitely worth reading the entire piece (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=easterbrook-110719_virginia_tech_helmet_study&sportCat=nfl).

Last year (now updated to May 2012), Va Tech released the first comprehensive study on helmet safety and how helmet choice may provide as much as 30% reduction in concussion rates.

Researchers at Virginia Tech have produced the first brand-by-brand, model-by-model ranking for the likely concussion resistance of helmets. A star-rating system modeled on crash safety rankings for automobiles, the rankings clearly identify the best and worst helmets.

Now the chilling part: the VSR4 -- Virginia Tech's second-lowest-rated helmet -- was the most common helmet in the NFL last season. The VSR4 is widely worn in college and high school, too. Immediately after the Virginia Tech findings were released, Riddell advised football teams to stop using the VSR4, long the company's best seller.

Virginia Tech Helmet Ratings™Adult Football Helmet Ratings - May 2012

A total of 15 adult football helmet models that have been evaluated using the STAR evaluation system are included in the May 2012 Virginia Tech Helmet Ratings™. All 15 helmets included in the ratings have been made available to consumers at the time of publication. Helmets with lower STAR values provide a reduction in concussion risk compared to helmets with higher STAR values. Based on this, the best overall rating of 5 Stars has the lowest STAR value. Group rankings are differentiated by pre-determined thresholds.
http://www.sbes.vt.edu/img/nid_ratings.jpg

drs23
05-04-2012, 08:09 PM
Here us one of the best articles I have come across of any review on helmet history, helmet development, helmet safety and formal helmet safety evaluation/ratings. It's definitely worth reading.

Last year (now updated to May 2012), Va Tech released the first comprehensive study on helmet safety and how helmet choice may provide as much as 30% reduction in concussion rates.

Why then, knowing what they know now advising consumers to not use this particular product, why would they not just discontinue it?

Because it makes too much sense, or because it's the biggest seller ?

CloakNNNdagger
05-04-2012, 08:49 PM
Why then, knowing what they know now advising consumers to not use this particular product, why would they not just discontinue it?

Because it makes too much sense, or because it's the biggest seller ?

This 2010 article indirectly addresses the answer. It apparently boils down to conflicts of interest.


The testing program had been spearheaded throughout 2009 by the former leaders of the N.F.L. research group, all of whom resigned in the past nine months after strong criticism of their conduct from the House Judiciary Committee and outside medical experts.

The co-chairmen of a newly constituted committee, Dr. H. Hunt Batjer and Dr. Richard G. Ellenbogen, said after facing Congressional barbs in May that they would discard all work of their predecessors.

That included the suspended helmet testing, Batjer said, because of its “poor methodologies” and “inherent conflict of interest” that were “not acceptable by any modern standards.” link (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/sports/football/25nfl.html)

HoustonFrog
05-05-2012, 06:48 AM
MAYBE Seau knew and hid it well. Just speculating

http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Seau-said-game-has-to-change.html

But in an interview with Sports Illustrated's Jim Trotter back in March, Seau was already championing the changes that Commissioner Roger Goodell has embraced regarding player safety - comments that sound have an eerie ring to them in the wake of his self-inflicted death on Wednesday at age 43.

"It has to happen," he said. "Those who are saying the game is changing for the worse, well, they don't have a father who can't remember his name because of the game. I'm pretty sure if everybody had to wake with their dad not knowing his name, not knowing his kids' name, not being able to function at a normal rate after football, they would understand that the game needs to change. If it doesn't there are going to be more players, more great players, being affected by the things that we know of and aren't changing. That's not right."

steelbtexan
05-05-2012, 07:16 AM
MAYBE Seau knew and his it well. Just speculating

http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Seau-said-game-has-to-change.html

Who said Seau or any player has/had to play football. They didn't, they chose to play. Concussions are part of the risk football players accepted when they chose to play. They are very well compensated for accepting this risk.

How many players in the 2012 draft didn't want to get drafted and accept the huge amounts of $$$$ for playing the game despite all of the new info regarding concussions. That number to my knowledge would be 0.

God'ell should've convinced the owners to pay the $$$$ so that former players could have lifetime medical benefits. It would've been cheaper than going through the current litigation.

And God'ell wouldn't have had to bastardize the game I love. God'ell has done more to ruin the game in a short amount of time than all of the former commisioners combined. Unfortunately the new labor deal that Kraft cut with the NFLPA means God'ell will be around for along time doing even more damage to the game.

God'ell appears to have a Napolean complex. The NFLPA signing off on a deal that gives God'ell the ability to be judge and jury over any and all disciplinary actions just is another sign of how incompetent DeMariuce Smith is as the leader of the NFLPA.

TexanSam
05-05-2012, 11:25 AM
Who said Seau or any player has/had to play football. They didn't, they chose to play. Concussions are part of the risk football players accepted when they chose to play. They are very well compensated for accepting this risk.

How many players in the 2012 draft didn't want to get drafted and accept the huge amounts of $$$$ for playing the game despite all of the new info regarding concussions. That number to my knowledge would be 0.

God'ell should've convinced the owners to pay the $$$$ so that former players could have lifetime medical benefits. It would've been cheaper than going through the current litigation.

And God'ell wouldn't have had to bastardize the game I love. God'ell has done more to ruin the game in a short amount of time than all of the former commisioners combined. Unfortunately the new labor deal that Kraft cut with the NFLPA means God'ell will be around for along time doing even more damage to the game.

God'ell appears to have a Napolean complex. The NFLPA signing off on a deal that gives God'ell the ability to be judge and jury over any and all disciplinary actions just is another sign of how incompetent DeMariuce Smith is as the leader of the NFLPA.

So because they choose to play football then the NFL shouldn't invest so much time and effort in improving player safety?

Well if that's the case then we should just let them go out and play with the old leather helmets.

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2012, 01:58 PM
So because they choose to play football then the NFL shouldn't invest so much time and effort in improving player safety?

Well if that's the case then we should just let them go out and play with the old leather helmets.

Vintage “Leatherhead” Football Helmets Often as Protective as Modern helmets in Common, Game-Like Hits, Cleveland Clinic Researchers Find (http://my.clevelandclinic.org/media_relations/library/2011/2011-11-04-vintage-leatherhead-football-helmets-often-as-protective-as-modern-helmets-in-common-game-like-hits.aspx)
Results Demonstrate Need for New Testing Standards, Greater Focus on Youth Helmets

November 4, 2011 [prepublication review]

Old-fashioned “leatherhead” football helmets from the early 1900s are often as effective as – and sometimes better than – modern football helmets at protecting against injuries during routine, game-like collisions, according to Cleveland Clinic researchers.

The study – published online Nov. 4 by the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine – compared head injury risks of two early 20th Century leatherhead helmets with 11 top-of–the-line 21st Century polycarbonate helmets.

In their biomechanics lab, Cleveland Clinic researchers conducted impact tests, crashing helmets together at severities on par with 95 percent of on-field collisions (75 g-forces or less) in collegiate and high school football games. For this study, researchers analyzed hits that are common in games and practices – hits that taken separately may not seem perilous but when added together may lead to serious long-term injury.

For many of the impacts and angles studied in the lab, the researchers found that leather helmets offered similar, or even better, protection than modern helmets.

“The point of this study is not to advocate for a return to leather helmets but, rather, to test the notion that modern helmets must be more protective than older helmets simply because ‘newer must be better,’” said lead researcher Adam Bartsch, Ph.D., Director of the Spine Research Lab in Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Spine Health. “Unlike cars, in which seat belts, airbags and crumple zones make the choice between a 1920’s Model T and modern mini-van a no-brainer, these results tell us that modern helmets have ample room to improve safety against many typical game-like hits.”

Though head and neck injuries were greatly reduced after football helmet standards and rule changes were instituted in 1970’s and 1980’s, the incidence of concussions have continued to increase. In fact, concussions are the leading cause of brain damage in sports, particularly in football. Estimates suggest that up to 40 percent of football players experience a concussion each year, with more than half of these going unreported.

Cleveland Clinic researchers note that helmet safety standards – as measured by the Gadd Severity Index – are based solely on the risk of severe skull fracture and catastrophic brain injury, not concussion risk. So, while modern helmets may prevent severe head injuries, this study found that they frequently did not provide superior protection in typical on-field impacts when compared to leather helmets.

“Today’s safety standards are no longer state-of-the-art predictors of injury,” said Edward Benzel, MD, Chair of Cleveland Clinic’s Department of Neurological Surgery. “Of course, preventing skull fractures is vitally important, but concussion prevention needs to be an integral part of the standards as well. Also, helmets need to protect against the cumulative effects of multiple lower impact blows that may not lead to a concussion immediately but may add up to cause severe long-term head, neck or brain injuries.”

The findings suggest that helmet testing should focus on both low- and high-energy impacts, not solely on potentially catastrophic high-energy impacts. This is especially true of youth football helmets, which are currently scaled-down versions of adult helmets. The lack of adequate knowledge surrounding adult helmet protectivity at low-energy impacts, as well as the current absence of any youth-specific helmet testing standards, may have serious brain health implications for the 3 million youths participating in tackle football in the United States each year.

The leatherhead study is one of several projects Cleveland Clinic is undertaking to better detect and prevent brain injuries across a wide range of sports, including football, boxing, hockey and soccer. Teams of researchers are working to make safer youth football helmets (through a grant from NFL Charities); create an Intelligent Mouthguard that measures the number and severity of hits to the head among athletes; produce a blood test that can diagnose concussions; and develop an iPad app that uses the device’s built-in gyroscope to quantitatively capture pre- and post-game measures of balance, memory and cognition. In Las Vegas, the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health has launched a landmark study with professional fighters that will help determine whether MRIs of the brain, along with other tests, can detect subtle changes in brain health that correlate with impaired thinking and functioning. The research teams draw from their experiences of caring for thousands of professional, amateur and youth athletes every year on the sidelines and in clinic.




************************************************** ******


Here is the actual Cleveland Clinic paper, for anyone interested:

Journal of Neurosurgery
Jan 2012 / Vol. 116 / No. 1 / Pages 222-233

Impact test comparisons of 20th and 21st century American football helmets
Laboratory investigation (http://thejns.org/doi/full/10.3171/2011.9.JNS111059?prevSearch=football%2Bhelmets&searchHistoryKey=)


One thing that was not taken into account is that with leather helmets....with no facemask..........players would think hard before allowing their faces to be re-arranged during a hit..........

TexanSam
05-05-2012, 03:36 PM
************************************************** ******


Here is the actual Cleveland Clinic paper, for anyone interested:




One thing that was not taken into account is that with leather helmets....with no facemask..........players would think hard before allowing their faces to be re-arranged during a hit..........

Ok, wasn't expecting that. That's interesting. However, that doesn't mean the NFL should just ignore player safety simply because these guys are millionaires and know the risks involved.

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2012, 07:56 PM
Ok, wasn't expecting that. That's interesting. However, that doesn't mean the NFL should just ignore player safety simply because these guys are millionaires and know the risks involved.


I don't believe I ever said or even implied that. Just pointing out that the NFL in recent history was not breaking their butts trying to gather and act upon true and accurate concussion and helmet safety information........not until bad publicity and attorneys got into the mix..........and others began doing the work that they should have all along.

TexanSam
05-05-2012, 07:59 PM
I don't believe I ever said or even implied that. Just pointing out that the NFL in recent history was not breaking their butts trying to gather and act upon true and accurate concussion and helmet safety information........not until bad publicity and attorneys got into the mix..........and others began doing the work that they should have all along.

Sorry, that statement wasn't aimed at you. It was a continuation of the post prior to that.

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2012, 08:17 PM
Junior Seau’s family unsure about donating his brainPosted by Michael David Smith on May 5, 2012, 7:37 PM EDT

The family of Junior Seau is still undecided about whether to allow his brain to be studied by researchers looking for clues about how collisions on the football field can cause brain injuries that affect players later in life.

On Thursday Shawn Mitchell, a pastor for the Seau family, said they had decided to let researchers study his brain. But today the pastor said the family is unsure what to do.

“They have now stepped back from what they were thinking initially,” Mitchell told Reuters on Saturday. “Nothing is definite right now.”

Mitchell declined to say whether any issues arose to make the family reconsider. It is also not clear whether Seau expressed any wishes to anyone about what he wanted done with his body or his brain after his death, and it is unclear which member of Seau’s family would ultimately make the decision. The divorced Seau is survived by his minor children, his parents and siblings.

“I don’t want to give the impression they’re not going to anymore,” Mitchell said. “We thought everything was kind of nailed, and now it’s in flux. I think everything is being revisited. . . . They just want to slow down, be sure they’re doing it right. With the incredible, incredible anguish and grief and pressure of this situation, they’ve been in a fog. Now, they’re getting counsel.”

Many NFL players have pledged their brains for research after their death. Most notably, Dave Duerson, who like Seau committed suicide with a gunshot to the chest, left a note asking that his brain be studied. Researchers discovered that Duerson’s brain showed signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which can be caused by repeated blows to the head and has been linked to depression.

Playoffs
05-06-2012, 08:11 AM
http://www.mercurynews.com/49ers/ci_20542616/former-seau-teammate-gary-plummer-he-was-crying

Said [Gary] Plummer: "In the 1990s, I did a concussion seminar. They said a Grade 3 concussion meant you were knocked out, and a Grade 1 meant you were seeing stars after a hit, which made me burst out in laughter. As a middle linebacker in the NFL, if you don't have five of these (Grade 1 effects) each game, you were inactive the next game.

"Junior played for 20 years. That's five concussions a game, easily. How many in his career then? That's over 1,500 concussions. I know that's startling, but I know it's true. I had over 1,000 in my 15 years..."

steelbtexan
05-06-2012, 04:31 PM
Taking the facemasks off of helments would eliminate many of the concussions. I would rather see this, rather than the way God'ell is trying to change the way the game is played.

Sam, I stand by my earlier post. It's a dangerous job, just like being a stuntman/woman/coal miner etc... is. They accept the risk and are well compensated for the risk. I do think that the NFL in conjunction with the helment companies should always try to develop safer equipment.

But in the meantime the rules of the game shouldn't be changed because of the lawsuits. God'ell overreacted, IMHO he should've just offered retired players full medical benefits and a slight increase in pension $$$$. Instead in typical lawyer/politically correct fashion God'ell is trying to take the violence out of the game. (Not going to happen.)

The NFLPA gave God'ell to much power. Is the NFLPA concerned about player saftey? That they are fighting the bountygate suspensions suggest they aren't concerned about player saftey. If they aren't concerned why should I be?

Vinny
05-06-2012, 06:20 PM
I wouldn't want to see them take facemasks off the helmets but they don't need hard shell helmets if you ask me. I'm sure they could make a helmet with a soft exterior with firm finish/skin that could be painted and that absorbs more impact than these hard shell helmets one day.

NitroGSXR
05-06-2012, 07:05 PM
I wouldn't want to see them take facemasks off the helmets but they don't need hard shell helmets if you ask me. I'm sure they could make a helmet with a soft exterior with firm finish/skin that could be painted and that absorbs more impact than these hard shell helmets one day.

Helmets are something that I am always thinking about. Not for football per se but motorcycles and construction as both apply to me but it applies here too really! I have always wanted them to create a motorcycle helmet design similar to construction hard hats. Free floating with bands. That's what absorbs the impact. No need for an extremely hard shell or heavy padding. Keep the impact area completely suspended from my head.

http://productimages.grainger.com/is/image/Grainger/4LN52_AS01?$productdetail$

Obviously it would have already been designed if the idea could work. Of course, theres much more impact with a motorcycle or a football helmet so there would need to be more room for expansion or however it works. I would think that it would be a too oversized of a design as it already is with hardhats but I sure have always been curious about it. I bet an MIT class could throw something functional out there.

infantrycak
05-06-2012, 08:10 PM
Obviously it would have already been designed if the idea could work. Of course, theres much more impact with a motorcycle or a football helmet so there would need to be more room for expansion or however it works.

US military kevlar helmet:

http://www.militaryheadgear.com/system/photos/000/001/459/large/MSG_Overbey%27s_PASGT_Helmet_with_Desert_Camouflag e_Cover.jpg?1250003946

NitroGSXR
05-06-2012, 08:22 PM
US military kevlar helmet:

http://www.militaryheadgear.com/system/photos/000/001/459/large/MSG_Overbey%27s_PASGT_Helmet_with_Desert_Camouflag e_Cover.jpg?1250003946

Bingo. Now how much does one of those cost? Realistically?

infantrycak
05-06-2012, 09:09 PM
Bingo. Now how much does one of those cost? Realistically?

I think they are around $300.

CloakNNNdagger
05-06-2012, 09:34 PM
Some principles may translate from military to NFL, but others won't since the types of trauma anticipated in each scenario are quite different.

Study of military helmets could provide insight to NFL (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/04/25/study-of-military-helmets-could-provide-insight-to-nfl/)

A Pentagon study looking for ways to reduce the incidence of traumatic brain injuries for American troops, comparing the effectiveness of different kinds of military helmets as well as two designs of helmets worn in the NFL, led to a surprisingly simple finding: Making helmets slightly bigger by adding one-eighth of an inch of padding can make the people wearing the helmets significantly less susceptible to brain injuries.

That may lead to a change in the design of the helmets given to American soldiers, and the study could also provide useful information to the NFL. The researchers found that NFL helmets didn’t work as well as military helmets because they were more rigid and allowed force to be transferred to the head. Army helmets were found to absorb a larger amount of the force.

However, the unclassified version of the full report (PDF here) notes that military helmets and football helmets aren’t necessarily designed to protect against the same types of injuries. The study doesn’t necessarily find that the NFL should follow military guidelines on helmet designs.

“n many football-relevant impact scenarios, the entire body mass of the player is driving the head into another object, and hence the impact energy that the pads must absorb may be greater,” the report says. “This could explain why the NFL pads tend to be both thicker and harder than the pads developed for the Army—they are designed for a different type of impact.”

So the study’s findings aren’t as simple as just recommending that the NFL make the padding in its helmets thicker. But as the NFL continues to make prevention of brain injuries on the field a high priority, these are the kinds of results that demand more research.

************************************************** ********


Tweaked helmet would better protect our troops[I]A slightly larger helmet with more foam padding would better protect soldiers and Marines from traumatic brain injury, researchers find. The Department of Defense says that more than 130,000 military personnel have suffered such injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan.
April 24, 2011|By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times

It is the "signature wound" of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: traumatic brain injury from the blast of the enemy's improvised explosive devices. Now two researchers say that minor changes in the military's combat helmet could reduce the incidence and severity of these injuries.

Using complex computer modeling to determine the impact of such blasts on helmets, physicist Willy Moss and mechanical engineer Michael King of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Northern California concluded that soldiers and Marines would be better protected by wearing a slightly larger helmet with 1/8 inch more foam padding.

"I'm almost embarrassed," King said, that the finding was so simple.

The two researchers had been selected by the Army and its Joint IED Defeat Organization, which is looking for better ways to protect military personnel against improved explosive devices, to perform the yearlong, $540,000 study based on previous work on blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

The assignment was to test which kind of helmet liner provided the most protection: two pads used by the Army, two used by the National Football League, and one used in other sports equipment. The pads had different configurations and hardness of foam, and different spacing and design of air pockets.

King and Moss found that the Army pads worked the best — but could work even better with just a slight change in thickness. "What we found amazing was that our results suggested a very low-cost strategy," Moss said.

The NFL pads, the two researchers found, didn't work as well because they were more rigid than the Army pads and thus allowed forces to be "transferred" to the head. The Army pad, 3/4 of an inch thick, absorbs a larger amount of the force.

The results of their tests have been forwarded to the Army and the Marine Corps for review and possible further testing.

At a Pentagon news conference Tuesday, officials said the findings would be included in the continuing research in several Army commands to design the safest possible helmet. A meeting is set for next month for military researchers involved in helmet design.

"This is a 'physics' answer — now we're trying to tie it back to the head," said Brig. Gen. Peter Fuller, program executive officer with an Army command dedicated to developing improved equipment.

Traumatic brain jury is defined as a concussion that can occur even without the skin being broken. The Department of Defense says that more than 130,000 military personnel have suffered traumatic brain jury in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Symptoms include headaches, loss of balance, difficulty driving, visual distortions, memory loss and trouble sleeping.

Earlier testing had suggested that the Army helmet, which is designed to cushion against a direct impact, was less suited to a blast-wave from an explosion, King and Moss said.

They found that if soldiers were to wear a helmet one size larger, with additional padding, their chances of avoiding traumatic brain jury would be improved by 24%. Helmets come in small, medium, large and extra-large.

However, the increased weight could be a stumbling block. Half of all soldiers and Marines wear a large-size helmet. The next size up is 9 ounces heavier, at 3 pounds 14 ounces.

Col. William Cole, a specialist in individual protection equipment, said soldiers at Ft. Benning, Ga., objected to adding even a single ounce to their helmets, let alone 9 ounces. A heavier helmet, he added, could also restrict maneuverability — although using a lighter material for the helmet could offset the added weight from the larger size.

Cole's experience at Ft. Benning differed from that of Moss when he went to Tampa, Fla., to meet with U.S. Special Forces soldiers. He said he was buoyed by their positive response to wearing slightly larger helmets.

"I used that as my sanity check," he said. "I trust those guys."

This is not the first time researchers have suggested that a change in the military helmet could better protect troops. Last year, a team from MIT suggested that a face shield could provide protection because the face is the "pathway" through which pressure from a blast travels to the brain.

Best known for its weapons design work, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory does research projects for the departments of Defense, Energy and Homeland Security. Among its recent projects are environmental cleanup and cancer research.

The helmet project is just one of several attempts by the military to find solutions to the traumatic brain injury problem:

Playoffs
05-06-2012, 09:44 PM
Really interested in what's been/being done to minimize Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), concussions, head injury.

I've wondered if a padded helmut http://www.blogcdn.com/backporch.fanhouse.com/media/2009/09/1mkelso090209.jpg reduces impact, or if anyone had tried a helmut that cracks to absorb energy?


Added another post of yours here as it's relevant:Here us one of the best articles I have come across of any review on helmet history, helmet development, helmet safety and formal helmet safety evaluation/ratings. It's definitely worth reading the entire piece (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=easterbrook-110719_virginia_tech_helmet_study&sportCat=nfl).

Last year (now updated to May 2012), Va Tech released the first comprehensive study on helmet safety and how helmet choice may provide as much as 30% reduction in concussion rates.

http://www.sbes.vt.edu/img/nid_ratings.jpg

HoustonFrog
05-07-2012, 09:13 AM
I have talking about the CTE aspect of this since the moment I heard the news but for another angle on this story this is a great read on players after football ends

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/may/04/seaus-death-brings-light-difficulty-tackling-life-/?page=1#article

A man took his own life, and we might never know exactly why.

But regardless of what comes of any investigations or revelations, we’ve got enough circumstantial evidence already to have an idea that the NFL, its players and those who claim to love both have got to do something.

Fact is, too many men are stumbling unprepared into a scary world when the game stops and real life starts.

Whether Junior Seau’s ultimate decision to commit suicide can be traced in any way to his having suffered concussions during his playing career is important to find out.

But that just might be too neat a bow to tie on this tragedy, too straight a line to draw from head trauma to depression to death.

No one will ever argue Seau had done that and continued to do so via philanthropy and business, as well as in the way he treated and took care of so many right up until his death.

But it is possible, even likely, according to some that knew him well, that when there was no more field on which to also earn respect, Seau was lost.

“Junior obviously had been facing demons for at least 18 months,” Gary Plummer, a former Seau teammate who played professionally for 15 seasons, told the San Jose Mercury News. “… He was crying out for help.”

Football is so intense and all-consuming,” Lynch said. “… The transition is extremely tough. It becomes apparent fairly quick you’ll never be able to replace what you got from football. That’s a tough realization, particularly when people’s identity gets wrapped up in being a football player.”

Lynch loves his post-NFL job as a commentator on Fox. He coaches his son’s baseball team and was speaking by phone Thursday from his Colorado home after attending a function at his kids’ school. He mentioned preparations for his charitable foundation’s upcoming event.

“I’m always applauded for the transition I’ve made, but I promise you four years later it’s still tough at times,” Lynch said. “It’s the times when there is down time, you start thinking and wondering, ‘Am I having a big enough impact on this world?’ That’s when the thought comes in that what you had you can’t ever replicate. That’s when it gets tough.”

CloakNNNdagger
05-07-2012, 12:02 PM
Really interested in what's been/being done to minimize Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), concussions, head injury.

I've wondered if a padded helmut http://www.blogcdn.com/backporch.fanhouse.com/media/2009/09/1mkelso090209.jpg reduces impact, or if anyone had tried a helmut that cracks to absorb energy?


Added another post of yours here as it's relevant:

The fully outer-padded helmet pictured above was worn by Bills safety Mark Kelso.


The other safety was a 10th-round draft pick out of William and Mary who never played a regular-season game for the Eagles. With Waters, Wes Hopkins and Ray Ellis on the roster, Mark Kelso never had a chance to make the team.

But he did go on to a long and distinguished career, appearing in four Super Bowls as a member of the Buffalo Bills. Kelso, who now does radio commentary on Bills games, isn't remembered as well for his 30 career interceptions as he is for wearing the ProCap helmet pad - an extra layer of protection that made him look, in his own words, like the Great Gazoo from the old Flintstones show.

"I had my first concussion in 1988," Kelso said the other day. "I had subsequent concussions, and I was diagnosed with migraine syndrome - the symptoms of a migraine as opposed to the severity of a concussion. I started wearing that extra pad in 1989, and I definitely credit it with extending my career the additional five years that I wore it. After a few games, there was no way I would have played without it."

So a full two decades before Goodell started fiddling, one of the NFL's Romans was taking proactive steps to put out the fire himself. Fifteen years after retiring, Kelso is still working to improve helmet safety.

The ProCap retired with him, a victim of aesthetics and pressure from the established helmet companies. Because of fears the soft pad could stick to another padded helmet, creating a new wave of neck and spine injuries, and because the technology was developed by an outside engineer named Bert Straus, helmet makers Riddell and Schutt voided their warranties if a player modified his helmet with the ProCap. (Westbrook has tried a Schutt model with extra padding, but it's unclear if he'll wear it when or if he returns.)link
************************************************** ********



The red padding on the outside of a helmet was introduced in 1960 because Woody Hayes suggested that it would cushion the blow to the head. So Ohio State had their Helmets padded centrally in "Mohawk" fashion.
In 1960 the Buckeyes used that padded gray helmet with the red stripe. The red padded part was more narrow early and did not go all the way back until around 1961.

http://images1.snapfish.com/347933966%7Ffp344%3Enu%3D3278%3E858%3E87%3A%3EWSNR CG%3D32335968%3B749%3Cnu0mrj



http://images1.snapfish.com/347933966%7Ffp344%3Enu%3D3278%3E858%3E87%3A%3EWSNR CG%3D32335969364%3B5nu0mrj

1962 Duke version "Mohawk" padded helmet:

http://images1.snapfish.com/34794%3C%3B69%7Ffp34%3A%3Enu%3D3278%3E858%3E87%3A% 3EWSNRCG%3D3233%3A989%3B374%3Cnu0mrj

**************************************

HJam72
05-07-2012, 12:29 PM
It needs to be on the sides too, looks be damned. :kitten:

Those ear-hole shots'll kill ya.

GP
05-08-2012, 04:27 PM
I think some people are just prone to suicidal thoughts.

I'm far removed from the epicenter of his life...but the more I read, from people who knew him, the more it seems he had depression issues first and foremost.

Can head trauma enhance those feelings? I think so. But the base element here, IMO, is that he already had some emotional problems to begin with. It's not like it was JUST the head trauma that introduced a new behavior in Seau.

A new helmet design needs to happen. You know how the super-duper sniper rifles have a recoil-limiting feature where the barrel slides backward on a rail...stabilizing the entire rifle as it fires? Why can't they find a sphere-type version of that, a helmet that displaces the inertia of the hit?

Double Barrel
05-08-2012, 05:07 PM
I thought that a helmet had been designed that absorbs most of the impact but players refused to wear it because they did not like the way it looks on them.

Does anyone remember that awhile back?

*****edit: just saw CnD's post above, which mentions it.

ChampionTexan
05-08-2012, 05:29 PM
The fully outer-padded helmet pictured above was worn by Bills safety Mark Kelso.



************************************************** ********



The red padding on the outside of a helmet was introduced in 1960 because Woody Hayes suggested that it would cushion the blow to the head. So Ohio State had their Helmets padded centrally in "Mohawk" fashion.
In 1960 the Buckeyes used that padded gray helmet with the red stripe. The red padded part was more narrow early and did not go all the way back until around 1961.

http://images1.snapfish.com/347933966%7Ffp344%3Enu%3D3278%3E858%3E87%3A%3EWSNR CG%3D32335968%3B749%3Cnu0mrj




**************************************

One of the many memorable things about Willie Lanier's HoF career with the Chiefs was the helmet that he wore. No clue how effective it was.
Lanier was known as Contact, a name coined by Chiefs' teammate Jerry Mays in 1967. As Lanier remembered: "Since I unfortunately followed the style of tackling that we were taught at that time - that was to use your head first of hitting players in the middle of their body. It was done in a rather aggressive manner".

But Lanier's uncontrolled tackling resulted in Chiefs' equipment manager Bobby Yarborough outfitting Lanier's helmet with extra padding. The padding was not on the inside of the helmet to protect Lanier but rather, as some photos of him in uniform show, on the outside of the helmet to protect the player he was tackling.
LINK (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Lanier)

http://www.profootballhof.com/UserFiles/image/Helmet_Lanier_Willie_630.jpghttp://www.helmethut.com/Chiefs/lanier2.jpg

drs23
05-08-2012, 09:02 PM
One of the many memorable things about Willie Lanier's HoF career with the Chiefs was the helmet that he wore. No clue how effective it was.

Really cool. Thanks I didn't know that.

Willie Lanier could and did lay the wood.

CloakNNNdagger
05-12-2012, 08:25 AM
Thousands attend Seau memorial in San Diego (http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/47395837/ns/nfl/?__utma=164291582.332013335.1336827468.1336827468. 1336827468.1&__utmb=164291582.6.9.1336828167203&__utmc=164291582&__utmx=-&__utmz=164291582.1336827514.1.1.utmcsr=(direct)|ut mccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=164291582.|8=Earned%20By=other%7CVideo%7Cpr ofootballtalk.nbcsports.com=1^30=Visit%20Type%20to %20Content=Earned%20to%20Original=1&__utmk=145583412)

Many player comments..........his jersey was retired during the ceremony.

devo-x
06-07-2012, 08:34 PM
Interesting ....

http://www.naturalnews.com/036095_Junior_Seau_Big_Pharma_Ambien.html

CloakNNNdagger
07-12-2012, 04:02 PM
Junior Seau’s family donates brain tissue for research (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/07/12/junior-seaus-family-donates-brain-tissue-for-research/)
Posted by Josh Alper on July 12, 2012, 2:58 PM EDT


Junior Seau’s brain tissue is on its way to the National Institutes of Health.

The Associated Press reports that Seau’s family asked the San Diego County medical examiner’s office to send some of the former NFL linebacker’s brain tissue to the NIH for research. The medical examiner does not have any information about what kind of tests will be done on Seau’s brain, but it likely will be related to the ongoing work being done to discover links between head injuries suffered on the field and problems later in life. Seau killed himself in early May.

Previous research has found signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the brains of former NFL safeties Dave Duerson and Andre Waters, both of whom also committed suicide. CTE is a neurological condition caused by repeated blows to the head and it has been found in players at the collegiate level as well as several dead former professionals. A pathologist who has worked extensively on identifying CTE took part in the autopsy performed on Seau and a Boston group focused on the condition requested a chance to study Seau’s brain tissue shortly after his death.

There’s no word on when or if results of the research will be made public.

Playoffs
08-21-2012, 11:19 AM
Junior Seau autopsy finds no signs of drugs or brain damage (http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0821-junior-seau-20120821,0,1438253.story)

Football star Junior Seau had no alcohol or illicit drugs in his system when he committed suicide, and an initial examination of his brain showed no apparent damage from his years of football, according to the autopsy and toxicology reports released Monday by the San Diego County medical examiner.

Also, his girlfriend, Megan P. Noderer, told police that Seau, 43, had given no indication he planned to kill himself, according to the investigative narrative attached to the autopsy report...

HoustonFrog
08-21-2012, 04:20 PM
It may have just been depression. You never know. Failed restaurant or just missing football. We have no clue how each individual feels or thinks.