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CloakNNNdagger
11-18-2011, 10:52 PM
The Washington Post reveals.

By Associated Press, Updated: Friday, November 18, 8:16 PM

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Days after losing the job he held for nearly a half century, former Penn State coach Joe Paterno was diagnosed with a treatable form of lung cancer.

Scott Paterno, the Hall of Fame coach’s son, said in a statement provided Friday to The Associated Press that his father’s doctors are optimistic the 84-year-old Paterno will make a full recovery.

The news came shortly after Penn State said the NCAA would look into the school’s handling of a child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. Paterno was fired by the board of trustees Nov. 9 for failing to do more about an abuse allegation against Sandusky than report it to his superiors.

“Last weekend, my father was diagnosed with a treatable form of lung cancer during a follow-up visit for a bronchial illness,” Scott Paterno said in the brief statement. The doctor’s visit came the same weekend the school played its first game since the 1960s without Paterno leading the Nittany Lions — Penn State lost, 17-14 to Nebraska.

“As everyone can appreciate, this is a deeply personal matter for my parents, and we simply ask that his privacy be respected as he proceeds with treatment,” Scott Paterno said.

Earlier Friday, The Citizens Voice of Wilkes-Barre reported that Paterno had been seen Wednesday visiting the Mount Nittany Medical Center and was treated for an undisclosed ailment and released.

Sandusky is charged with sexually abusing eight boys over 15 years — charges which he denies. Critics say Paterno should have done more to stop his former assistant, specifically when he was told about an assault in 2002. But the longtime coach is not a target of the ongoing investigation of Sandusky.

Paterno initially announced his retirement effective at the end of the season, saying that the scandal was “one of the great sorrows of my life. With the benefit of hindsight, I wish I had done more.” The trustees fired him anyway, about 12 hours later.

Longtime defensive coordinator Tom Bradley replaced Paterno on an interim basis. He broke the news about Paterno’s cancer to the Nittany Lions after the team arrived in Columbus, Ohio, for Saturday’s game against Ohio State.

“I told them sometimes words pale at a time like this. I felt they should hear it from us, exactly what it was, that we were told that it was a treatable lung cancer,” Bradley said. “It’s just one of those things. It’s a tough time for the players.”

Former Penn State quarterback Todd Blackledge, now an ESPN analyst, said Paterno never mentioned the illness when he visited his former coach Thursday in State College.

“In a week or so of many surprises this was another one,” said Blackledge, who noted that Paterno was in good spirits when he saw him. A Penn State spokesman said that as far as he knew, Paterno never smoked.

To say health problems added to Paterno’s troubles during a rough period doesn’t begin to capture the last two weeks. The lurid Sandusky scandal has tarnished the reputation of a coach and a football program that once prided itself on the slogan “Success with Honor.”

The Hall of Famer’s 409 career victories are a Division I record. In all, Paterno guided five teams to unbeaten, untied seasons, and won two national championships.

Sandusky was once expected to succeed Paterno but retired in 1999 not long after being told he wouldn’t get the job.

Two university officials stepped down after they were charged with lying to a grand jury and failing to report the 2002 charge to police, an assault which allegedly took place in a shower in the football building.

A grand jury report said the attack was witnessed by Mike McQueary, a graduate assistant at the time. Now the receivers coach but on administrative leave, McQueary told the grand jury he went to his father first and then to Paterno, who in turn spoke with his boss but didn’t go to the police.

When the state’s top cop said Paterno failed to execute his moral responsibility by not contacting police, public outrage built and the trustees acted.

Besides the criminal case against Sandusky, the university announced last week it was conducting its own probe — and that was before the NCAA said Friday that college sports’ governing body would also start an inquiry.

NCAA president Mark Emmert said in the letter to Penn State president Rod Erickson the probe will look at “Penn State’s exercise of institutional control over its intercollegiate athletics programs.”

That once was never a question with Paterno, regarded as college football’s model for running a clean program. He placed as much pride in graduating players as getting to bowl games, and consistently had Penn State among the top-rated academic programs in the country.

Paterno has donated millions back to the university, and his name graces a campus library — not a football facility or athletic complex.

Prior to his firing, Paterno pressed on with coaching in spite of a number of recent ailments. He often walked into news conferences fighting back sniffles, and Paterno often passed it off as nothing more than an annoying cold.

He was said to be in good health this preseason — getting back to his routine of walking around town — before a receiver accidentally blindsided him during preseason drills in August, leaving him with an injured right shoulder and pelvis.

Known for his stubbornness and high pain threshold, Paterno walked away from the collision and stayed on his feet for the rest of the practice period before being encouraged to get checked out by a doctor. The injuries forced him to spend most of the season in the press box.

During the 2010 offseason, Paterno scaled back personal appearances because of an intestinal issue and an adverse reaction to antibiotics prescribed for dental work.

Paterno ran practices from a golf cart in 2008 and spent much of that season in the press box after injuring his hip while trying to show players how to perform an onside kick in practice. Two years earlier, he broke his leg in a sideline collision during Penn State’s game at Wisconsin at Camp Randall Stadium.

“This is very unfortunate news and another sad note for our Penn State community,” said school president Rod Erickson, who replaced Graham Spanier — Spanier also was ousted the same night Paterno was fired.

“Our thoughts are with him and his family at this difficult time and we certainly pray for his speedy recovery,” Erickson said.

Lung cancer kills 1.4 million people around the world each year. In the United States, 221,130 new cases and 156,940 deaths are expected this year. The disease is typically diagnosed in older people. About 2 out of 3 people diagnosed with lung cancer are over age 65.

“There’s a significant number of people who are diagnosed in their 70s and 80s,” said chief medical officer Dr. Otis Brawley of the American Cancer Society. He has no involvement in Paterno’s treatment.

“Generally when I hear that a person has a treatable form of lung cancer, it means the person may very well benefit from surgery to remove a part of the lung,” Brawley said.

While the surgery can be invasive, people who undergo the operation “can do well after that,” he said.

The lights were dim Friday night at Paterno’s modest ranch home next to a park near the end of a dead-end street. A few TV photographers waited across the street for any sign of the coach.

About a mile away, a steady stream of fans arrived in pairs to take pictures at the life-sized bronzed statue of Paterno outside Beaver Stadium. Jill Varady, 24, of York, said she found out about Paterno’s illness after her aunt posted a comment on Facebook.

Despite the scandal, the school should now let Paterno “definitely let him finish the season, and then ... let him retire,” Varady said. “We probably will never know everything that happened.”

The illness didn’t change the perception of how Paterno handled the Sandusky situation, said Tessa Drawbaugh, 26, of State College. “But as far as other than that, he’s an icon,” she said. “Everybody wants him to be well.”

Curious timing to say the least.

NitroGSXR
11-19-2011, 07:10 AM
Joe Paterno has cancer? Hell yeah! Oh it's treatable? Dammit.

Joe Paterno can burn for all I care. I hope this is as painful as it can be for him. To hell with him.

TimeKiller
11-19-2011, 08:36 AM
Aka Joe Paterno needs people to feel sorry for him. THE BIG C!!!!! except it's treatable. I'm with Nitro. This is a pity story if I ever heard one. I, Timekiller, in no way believe he had or has any form of cancer. I believe this is simply to make people feel sorry for him in an attempt to seperate him from the monster he hid. Let's never forget WHO had the closet with the skeleton in it.
Joe Paterno: Man, Coach, Legend, Lookout for child molesters.

BattleRedToro
11-19-2011, 08:40 AM
Maybe he got it from blowing smoke up so many people's asses for so long.

Playoffs
01-21-2012, 06:24 PM
NFLN just reported Joe Pa is "near death".

False Start
01-21-2012, 08:09 PM
Just reported (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/21/joe-paterno-dead-ex-penn-state-football-coach_n_1221289.html?ref=college) he's passed. RIP Jo Pa. :(

Edit, it was a BS report! What the hell? :wadepalm:

Link (https://twitter.com/#!/BreakingNews/status/160908449599848451)

NitroGSXR
01-21-2012, 08:29 PM
Glad it's false. In the meantime, I hope the pain is intense. He needs to suffer a while longer. I have no compassion whatsoever for that monster.

gary
01-21-2012, 09:53 PM
I hope he wins his fight if there is anything that should die it is cancer not Joe.

Playoffs
01-21-2012, 09:58 PM
I hope he wins his fight if there is anything that should die it is cancer not Joe.I agree.

gary
01-21-2012, 10:09 PM
I agree.Having a father with it I don't like cancer whether the person is good or bad. It harms way to many good folks that I just rather see it go away then effect anyone anymore no matter who it is.

Wolf6151
01-21-2012, 10:10 PM
I like and respect the football coach that is Joe Pa may he RIP when his time comes, but Joe Pa the child molesting enabeler who turned his back on children being raped needs to be in prison and burn in ****.

False Start
01-21-2012, 10:26 PM
I like and respect the football coach that is Joe Pa may he RIP when his time comes, but Joe Pa the child molesting enabeler who turned his back on children being raped needs to be in prison and burn in ****.

Pretty much.

Showtime100
01-22-2012, 04:25 AM
Realizing he has cancer, I think the last few months are killing him quicker than anything else. I think he regrets his actions and his part in the whole thing, but quite possibly for all the wrong reasons. No matter what his regrets stem from in his mind, to know he and Penn State has lost it all in such a relatively short amount of time could be (and probably is) killing him quicker than the disease.

chicagotexan2
01-22-2012, 09:31 AM
Pretty much.

Same here my image of the coach was shattered by the reality of the man. I won't celebrate his passing but I won't shed a tear either.

axman40
01-22-2012, 09:35 AM
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Joe Paterno, the longtime Penn State coach who won (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20120122/fbc-obit-joe-paterno/#) more games than anyone in major college football but was fired amid a child sex abuse scandal that scarred his reputation for winning with integrity, died Sunday. He was 85.
His family released a statement Sunday morning to announce his death.
"He died as he lived," the statement said. "He fought hard until the end, stayed positive, thought only of others and constantly reminded everyone of how blessed his life had been. His ambitions were far reaching, but he never believed he had to leave this Happy Valley to achieve them. He was a man devoted to his family, his university (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20120122/fbc-obit-joe-paterno/#), his players and his community."
Paterno built his program on the credo "Success with Honor," and he found both. The man known as "JoePa" won 409 games and took the Nittany Lions to 37 bowl games and two national championships. More than 250 of the players he coached went on to the NFL.
"He will go down as the greatest football coach in the history of the game," Ohio State coach Urban Meyer said after his former team, the Florida Gators, beat Penn State 37-24 in the 2011 Outback Bowl.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20120122/fbc-obit-joe-paterno/

Showtime100
01-22-2012, 09:54 AM
RIP Joe.

IDEXAN
01-22-2012, 10:11 AM
His tenure as the most successful coach in major college football history ended abruptly amid allegations he failed to respond forcefully enough to a sex abuse scandal involving a former assistant.
http://www.cnn.com/
**************************
It's more than a sports story.
See it's already been posted, but under the circumstances this is far more than a mere sports story.

gary
01-22-2012, 10:11 AM
It is still very sad IMHO not just him dying but the whole story. RIP Joe. I will never understand what trurly happened over there and why no one ever did anything. I don't have any other words but this story never had to be as big/bad as it is today if someone would have just said the word years ago. I'll stop now because posting/talking about it makes me angry.

StarStruck
01-22-2012, 10:49 AM
My condolences to the Paterno family and wishes for peace in this time of mourning for their loved one.

I reflect to my son predicting that Joe would probably would survive six months after the exposure and his role in knowing the molestations were allowed to continue.

IlliniJen
01-22-2012, 11:58 AM
A predictable ending to a sad collapse of a myth. I neither celebrate or mourn.

Dutchrudder
01-22-2012, 12:03 PM
People like Joe Pa make me wish there was a hell. **** him and the Penn State athletic department.

gary
01-22-2012, 12:10 PM
A predictable ending to a sad collapse of a myth. I neither celebrate or mourn.Nor do I. I cannot get over this story and do not think I ever will. Who can?

Vinny
01-22-2012, 01:03 PM
I lost all respect for Joe Paterno. Funny thing about the fragility of respect - plenty of hard work goes into creating an excellent reputation, but it doesn't take much to lose one. Too bad he wasn't healthy enough for the public to cross examine him in a court of law. Wherever he thought he was going in the afterlife, I'm pretty sure he ain't getting there.

gary
01-22-2012, 01:14 PM
I think all this F him stull is unnecessary JMHO. Not enough blame towards Jerry S. either.

Vinny
01-22-2012, 01:21 PM
I think all this F him stull is unnecessary JMHO. Not enough blame towards Jerry S. either.If that is a response to my post, I never went there Gary. I lost respect for the guy - it's an honest statement. If you can't take that opinion then fine, but don't put the F word in my mouth.

TexanSam
01-22-2012, 01:25 PM
I'm not saddened by this news. I'm not happy about it either, but I can't say I'm disappointed. After doing what he did, or didn't do, by not reporting what was taking place, I lost all respect for him.

Honoring Earl 34
01-22-2012, 01:26 PM
If that is a response to my post, I never went there Gary. I lost respect for the guy - it's an honest statement. If you can't take that opinion then fine, but don't put the F word in my mouth.

I grew up not liking Joe Pa because he would whine about not getting any respect in the polls . This was after my team , the Longhorns of James Street , Jim Bertleson , Steve Wortster won the championship . Of course Joe beat Lehigh , Cornell , and the likes .

I then grew to respect them because of the squeaky clean image he pushed . Of course we now know it was a sham .

RIP Joe

gary
01-22-2012, 02:16 PM
If that is a response to my post, I never went there Gary. I lost respect for the guy - it's an honest statement. If you can't take that opinion then fine, but don't put the F word in my mouth.Not you man. Not you.

Playoffs
01-22-2012, 02:28 PM
Reminds not to elevate one man to too high a pedastal, and not to place too much faith in one person. People will disappoint you.

Joe Pa was not all good or all bad. May he RIP.

Vinny
01-22-2012, 02:37 PM
I understand how you feel Gary. Life is a tough complicated journey at times. At the age of 47 I've come to figure that blind faith is ok, but it's reserved for family and people I can talk to personally. Even then, some will still let you down despite your best efforts to only invest in those who you think deserve it.

NitroGSXR
01-22-2012, 02:57 PM
I think all this F him stull is unnecessary JMHO. Not enough blame towards Jerry S. either.

Gary, I understand where you're coming from about cancer. I have had close relatives succumb to cancer myself and I am a likely candidate being a smoker myself. This isn't about that. It matters none to me how they get taken out... Just as long as they get taken out as painfully as possible.

Not enough blame?!?! To think that I or anyone else is not giving any IF NOT ALL blame to Sandusky is just ignorant. Sandusky's getting a pineapple up the ass daily.

Joe Paterno, Tim Curley, and even McCready all chose football over children. They all had no qualms with allowing Sandusky to resume his work in the Second Mile. Football was WAYYYYYYYYY more important to them than some locker room rythmic slapping.

Let them burn.

gary
01-22-2012, 03:07 PM
I understand how you feel Gary. Life is a tough complicated journey at times. At the age of 47 I've come to figure that blind faith is ok, but it's reserved for family and people I can talk to personally. Even then, some will still let you down despite your best efforts to only invest in those who you think deserve it.I would not call it blind faith anymore because I used to really like Paterno a lot and think he was great but I don't anymore. No love or strong hate for the guy just shock he let this go for so long and still asking why. I am just a loss epecially for the victims it is really too bad for them and for the students there too. They are all hurt forever.

mattieuk
01-22-2012, 03:08 PM
It's such a bizarre fall from grace. If Paterno has died this time last year, there would have been teary eyed tributes from across the country, across University divides.

And then the whole sordid affair came out, and Paterno lost the respect he garnered, and I honestly think that college football lost a lot of the mystique, and partisanship that it thrives on on the back of this case. After all, if you couldn't trust 'JoePa' - who the heck could you trust?

My thoughts to his family - who must have suffered so much already over the past 6 months. As for Paterno - same as with other posters here - neither celebration or grief over his passing.

gary
01-22-2012, 03:20 PM
His poor wife has probably been through hell and back again.

NitroGSXR
01-22-2012, 03:31 PM
His poor wife has probably been through hell and back again.

Yes she has. The Paterno family has my condolences.

chicagotexan2
01-22-2012, 03:31 PM
His poor wife has probably been through hell and back again.

A lot of people went thru hell and back in his life that didn't have to if only paterno had cared more about children being molested and doing the right thing instead of winning and protecting his predophile buddy.

Playoffs
01-22-2012, 03:35 PM
Nor do I. I cannot get over this story and do not think I ever will. Who can?Would just like to know why. What was he thinking? I just can't for the life of me imagine.

gary
01-22-2012, 03:59 PM
A lot of people went thru hell and back in his life that didn't have to if only paterno had cared more about children being molested and doing the right thing instead of winning and protecting his predophile buddy.

Would just like to know why. What was he thinking? I just can't for the life of me imagine.Believe me I wish I had the power to go back to 02 and make things right for the sake of those kids at the time because I would do so right now. It just sucks it really does. Without being it person it is not easy to explain my emotions about this story as well as cancer too in general I hate both of them equally not just one mor than the other but I now feel like I am just going around in circles in this thread by not being face to face. Blame everyone because there is so much to go around I actually do believe in the death penalty for sever molesters like Jerry that is all I have to say.

Dutchrudder
01-22-2012, 11:28 PM
I think all this F him stull is unnecessary JMHO. Not enough blame towards Jerry S. either.

When Sandusky dies or has his own thread, he will get plenty of contempt.

As for Joe, I read the Grand Jury report, up until about victim 8, when I couldn't stand to read any more recounts of what happened in the PSU lockerroom. Joe could have prevented many of those victims if he had used his local power to get Sandusky off campus and blackballed around town. He could have done more to disavow him from the program, but didn't bother cause he had more important things to do like football practice and booster meetings. It's a pathetic story on his part, his legacy will go down in infamy and rightly so. I don't have a single shred of respect for him, the PSU athletic department or the board of trustees. I would love nothing more than to see the football program get the death penalty, and all the officials involved get 5-20 years for their misdeeds. They are all child molesting enablers who are no better than the guy driving the getaway car in a bank robbery. My only regret in Joe's death is that he didn't get to die in a jail cell where he belonged.

The1ApplePie
01-23-2012, 10:49 AM
I wonder if he'll get the Michael Jackson treatment and have all the bad get glossed over after his death.

Playoffs
01-23-2012, 01:18 PM
Washington Post reporter Sally Jenkins was granted access for an interview with Joe Pa just before his passing. It's a pay site to read/see all of it, but here's what is free:

By Sally Jenkins, Published: January 22

Joe Paterno could outtalk anybody in that Brooklyn beat cop’s voice of his. But the lung cancer and the chemo had left him breathless, and what emerged in two days of conversations with him, the last interview he would give, sounded like a series of sighs. Some of them satisfied, some of them regretful, all of them aware that his life was drawing to a close and 85 years were being relentlessly and reductively defined.

Paterno studied his own end, and knew it wasn’t going to be storybook. So much for the old-fashioned narrative he had built, of bookish yet vigorous young men filling a stadium in the Alleghenies, men he had uplifted such as Franco Harris and Lydell Mitchell and Brandon Short, autumn leaves swirling softly over their heads.

“There’s the kind of stories I wish we could tell,” Paterno whispered.

But a modern grotesquery intervened, and there were too many other boys who allegedly had been damaged.

For most of his 61 years as a football coach at Penn State, Paterno built a record of thorough decency and good intention. He loved his wife, reared five nice children, taught his students well. He turned down big money for the role of a tenured professor, and strolled every day from his modest home to his unpretentious office. He acquired real power, and generally tried not to abuse it, and if sometimes he did, he covered for it by insisting on paying for his ice cream cones. He set out to prove that staying in one place could be as rewarding as climbing to the next rung. He meant to walk away sooner. He stayed too long.

He stayed so long that he became more of an ideal to his followers than a person. Then the horrific happened, and the quaint success story in the peaceful hamlet was destroyed by allegations that Jerry Sandusky, Paterno’s assistant coach for 30 years, was a serial child molester and that Paterno, when told of an incident involving Sandusky and a small boy in the Penn State showers, did his duty but no more, passing the report to his superiors. The only way to give the tragedy the gravity it deserved was to topple the icon who behaved so fallibly.

“You got what you got,” he says he told himself, after he was fired by the board of trustees in November. “You did about as much as you can do, on the field and off the field.”

Yet Paterno also understood he was the face of a terrible inaction. He had done more than some people, yet less than he should have when he failed to press his superiors about Mike McQueary’s report of seeing Sandusky doing something sexual to a small boy in the Lasch football building.

“I should have said ‘Hey where are we with this thing?’ ” Paterno said. He described himself as paralyzed by the unthinkable subject matter. He had “backed away,” he said, and trusted his bosses to handle it.

“I didn’t know which way to go,” he said. “And rather than get in there and make a mistake . . .”

A week ago, Paterno invited this reporter into his home because he wanted to defend his record and give his version of events in the Sandusky case. He often seemed to be trying to explain his actions to himself as much as to others. It was a difficult conversation because it was not only his first interview on the subject of Sandusky but quite possibly the last interview he would ever give. His health was clearly precarious, and his answers often trailed off or wandered. Shortly afterward, he failed badly, and slipped in and out of consciousness over the next few days.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/colleges/joe-paterno-dies-leaving-a-record-for-others-to-debate/2012/01/22/gIQA24bsIQ_story.html


And a video portion of Joe Pa's interview just before his passing:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/joe-paterno-weve-got-a-problem-i-think-219/2012/01/14/gIQAd9q3yP_video.html

Vinny
01-23-2012, 03:47 PM
“I should have said ‘Hey where are we with this thing?’ ” Paterno said. “I didn’t know which way to go,” he said. “And rather than get in there and make a mistake . . .” he talks of the kid as if he was sub-human. This thing? Didn't want to make a mistake so do nothing? What a TOTAL POS.

TimeKiller
01-24-2012, 07:56 AM
I saw a few people on Facebook saying something to the extent of, "Why are people giving Paterno so much grief, he just died, etc..."


I'm like, really? Oh yeah, I remember now, because it was only like 2 or 3 months ago when the word was he basically stood as lookout so his friend could **** children in the bathrooms.

Oh but let's just forget about that. Build a statue of him.

Dutchrudder
01-24-2012, 09:53 AM
I saw a few people on Facebook saying something to the extent of, "Why are people giving Paterno so much grief, he just died, etc..."


I'm like, really? Oh yeah, I remember now, because it was only like 2 or 3 months ago when the word was he basically stood as lookout so his friend could **** children in the bathrooms.

Oh but let's just forget about that. Build a statue of him.

If they do build a statue of him, I hope they put one of these about 10 feet from it:

http://www.uwyo.edu/uwpdsupport/images/Emergency_Call_Box_Freeburn.jpg

Dutchrudder
01-24-2012, 11:09 AM
The girl who wrote this article knocked it out of the park. It's graphic in content, but on point in why Paterno (and everyone else's) inaction was so terrible. It really brings a harsh realistic perspective to child abuse with first-hand recounts of what happened to her. It's a long read, but worthwhile.

An excerpt from her article:

...

But I don't have guilt over that anymore. And on this day, when some people want to mourn and be "torn" and "conflicted" over the death of Joe Paterno, I have no guilt or shame about saying to every single person who knew, who suspected, who was outright told and passed the buck on to someone else while children were being raped by grown men, **** you. **** you for not doing your goddamn job or fulfilling your most basic moral obligation as an adult to protect children who were being harmed. And spare me your excuses, and your pleas for "respect", and "remembering the good things" you are rubbing salt in the wounds of every child that was victimized by Jerry Sandusky while he sat back and did nothing.

I feel no sympathy for Joe Paterno. I feel nothing for him at all. He died at 85 years old, and for the majority of his life he was at the top of the world- a hero, a saint, an icon. A rich and powerful man, in a position of power at a rich and powerful institution, that just so happened to allow countless children to be brutalized in order to maintain it's precious reputation and the money and power that went along with it. And he was complicit in that, no matter how much pretzel logic you use to try to excuse it away. At the very least, he was a moral coward, at worst he was a knowing enabler of the torture of children. Maybe he did have regrets, and maybe he was genuinely remorseful, but whatever personal hell he dealt with in his final months doesn't even come close to what the children who were victimized experienced, and they are still living with it every day.

...



http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/01/22/1057341/-F