PDA

View Full Version : Penn State Child Molestation Case


Pages : 1 2 [3]

ArlingtonTexan
06-22-2012, 10:27 PM
GUILTY!! Or so I heard... No links as of yet!

Here is one...45 counts found gulty

http://www.bostonherald.com/news/national/northeast/view.bg?articleid=1061140806&pos=breaking

Texan_Bill
06-22-2012, 10:29 PM
I would think so . I think the issue is how many counts but one is way to many .

I hope that they took into consideration that the Second mile was Sandusky's Neverland ranch ( whatever Jackos home was called ) designed to lure boys in .

At least enough to put him away!! My only hope is that he isn't sentenced to some "mental institution" and rather serves time in 'GEN-POP'!!!!

Texan_Bill
06-22-2012, 10:30 PM
Here is one...45 counts found gulty

http://www.bostonherald.com/news/national/northeast/view.bg?articleid=1061140806&pos=breaking

Thanks bro!!!

*EDIT* Repped for the update!

Honoring Earl 34
06-22-2012, 10:36 PM
At least enough to put him away!! My only hope is that he isn't sentenced to some "mental institution" and rather serves time in 'GEN-POP'!!!!

I'm sure the GP can't wait for Jerry .

NitroGSXR
06-22-2012, 11:04 PM
Send him to ADX Florence.

Heath Shuler
06-22-2012, 11:15 PM
http://d3j5vwomefv46c.cloudfront.net/photos/full/603656252.jpg?key=512331&Expires=1340422430&Key-Pair-Id=APKAIYVGSUJFNRFZBBTA&Signature=EsY5NUGT0dX7Orvk60Bzu4MLfMm~cV1ZqT7T7m6P LVbAMS~6jnF4t-29QxAfyLexXad~7sHqg3fZ6hREyJLsB~ooWowmKnmf~ZvOG28i bL0BUiYOfULgypqAuOCbtPcGgy6QFOJ39rqPHWu-VXrmllx~v9jotQYivc0q2J032u8_

eriadoc
06-22-2012, 11:50 PM
Penn State football needs the death penalty. This is way, way worse than anything SMU did. And Paterno needs to be posthumously castigated.

powda
06-23-2012, 12:41 AM
No way in hell hes going to gp. He'll be placed ad seg for years. Put your fantasies of shanks in his neck and "retaliatory rapes" by 100's of inmates away.

Corrosion
06-23-2012, 02:58 AM
Just take this piece of sh!t out behind the barn and shoot him dead.

ckhouston
06-23-2012, 09:22 AM
At least enough to put him away!! My only hope is that he isn't sentenced to some "mental institution" and rather serves time in 'GEN-POP'!!!!

This would be the perfect time to bring back public hangings. This one justifies it.

Dread-Head
06-23-2012, 12:22 PM
I've seen interviews with this guy. He HONESTLY doesn't see anything he did wrong. He's a sick, sick man. He's going to prison and they should make him see the prison shrink whenever possible. The fact that he spent decades doing this is the saddest part of all. Only 8 of his victims came forward. We'll never know how many of them refused to speak out because of how embarrasing and humiliating they would have found it.
The sad thing here is there ARE no winners. This sick, sick fool stole the innocence of young boys he was supposed to have been HELPING and there are now young men who are emotionally scarred for the remainder of their lives because of his actions. His wife and family have to live with the shame of what he did and society as a whole will now be even MORE suspicious of ANY adult who works with kids.

Sandusky will be in prison for the rest of his life, but right now as you're reading this some other "adult" is probably taking advantage of a position of trust and obliterating the mental health of a boy or girl.

NitroGSXR
06-23-2012, 12:51 PM
No way in hell hes going to gp. He'll be placed ad seg for years. Put your fantasies of shanks in his neck and "retaliatory rapes" by 100's of inmates away.

I do not advocate life sentences of any kind. They are not going to be given the opportunity to rehabilitate so there's no point... but if you're going to do it, there's no better place for it than Colorado.

eriadoc
06-23-2012, 01:53 PM
I've seen interviews with this guy. He HONESTLY doesn't see anything he did wrong. He's a sick, sick man.

I agree. And that is exactly why I want the Penn State football program to die. Sick bastards do what sick bastards do. It's an unfortunate part of reality. The fact that supposedly upstanding, Christian men covered for and/or turned their head to this is actually worse IMO, because they are NOT sick. JoePa was perfectly sane and still let this happen. The AD chose not to pursue it because of the potential black eye. Even the assistant coach that stumbled upon it didn't do everything he should have done.

The failure in the system was not that a mentally deranged bastard did what he did, but rather that perfectly sane and supposedly moral protectorates of young men let it go unchecked.

MojoMan
06-23-2012, 03:55 PM
Jerry Sandusky is on suicide watch at the county jail and is being held in protective custody.

It may not be politically correct to say this, but why is it important to keep him from committing suicide if he wants to? He is almost certainly going to die in prison. The only question remaining is when. So, it is just a matter of timing. And when he eventually does die in prison, it his hard to imagine very many people being saddened by his passing.

I just don't get this. Of course it would be wrong to encourage him to kill himself or to put him in a situation where another prisoner was likely to kill him. But if he really was dead set on ending his own life, why should anyone feel compelled to interfere with that?

Jerry Sandusky on Suicide Watch, Undergoing Evaluations (http://abcnews.go.com/US/jerry-sandusky-suicide-watch-undergoing-evaluations/story?id=16635957)

Jerry Sandusky is on suicide watch at the local jail after being convicted on 45 counts of sexually abusing young boys, the former Penn State coach's defense attorney said today.

....

Defense attorney Karl Rominger told CNN today that Sandusky is being held on suicide watch in protective custody, away from other inmates. The jail would not comment on Sandusky's condition to ABC News.

Sandusky will be held at the county jail for approximately 90 days, until he is sentenced by Cleland to what will likely amount to life in prison.

After that, he will likely spend the rest of his days in a state prison in Pennsylvania, living among the general population of 18- to 79-year olds until he ages out of the system and is transferred to a facility for older prisoners.

ckhouston
06-23-2012, 05:10 PM
Of course it would be wrong to encourage him to kill himself or to put him in a situation where another prisoner was likely to kill him.

Why?

If they offered me five minutes alone with that man he would no longer be an issue.

MojoMan
06-23-2012, 06:29 PM
Why?

If they offered me five minutes alone with that man he would no longer be an issue.

I suspect that some of his future fellow inmates are likely to share your perspective on that. In fact, if he survives to see his first anniversary in state prison, I will be surprised.

ckhouston
06-23-2012, 08:03 PM
I suspect that some of his future fellow inmates are likely to share your perspective on that. In fact, if he survives to see his first anniversary in state prison, I will be surprised.

Maybe he will get the Dahmer special in the shower.

powda
06-24-2012, 03:03 AM
I do not advocate life sentences of any kind. They are not going to be given the opportunity to rehabilitate so there's no point... but if you're going to do it, there's no better place for it than Colorado.

I believe in rehabilitation especially for young offenders who make dumb choices and still have a chance to do something with their lives. BUT, I also stongly believe in life sentences and the death penalty. Some crimes are so disturbing a person uses up ALL of their chances to ever mingle with society again. To me this is clearly one of those instances. There is no death penalty violent or painfull enough to make amends for this man's actions.

ArlingtonTexan
06-24-2012, 09:54 AM
Jerry Sandusky is on suicide watch at the county jail and is being held in protective custody.

It may not be politically correct to say this, but why is it important to keep him from committing suicide if he wants to? He is almost certainly going to die in prison. The only question remaining is when. So, it is just a matter of timing. And when he eventually does die in prison, it his hard to imagine very many people being saddened by his passing.

I just don't get this. Of course it would be wrong to encourage him to kill himself or to put him in a situation where another prisoner was likely to kill him. But if he really was dead set on ending his own life, why should anyone feel compelled to interfere with that?

In my case, I think that he gets out of having to live with his guilt, if he is truly able to do that, if he kills or even if society kills him or places him in a situation to be killed. Death is an easy way out on the human level. I am guessing that every person he molested over the years did not come foward and those that did had to re-live a terrible secret that shaped who they were. Sandusky got to live (falsely) as a well-respected, well-connected member of the community. Honestly, I believe that he is never really going to pay properly.

NitroGSXR
06-24-2012, 11:43 AM
I believe in rehabilitation especially for young offenders who make dumb choices and still have a chance to do something with their lives. BUT, I also stongly believe in life sentences and the death penalty. Some crimes are so disturbing a person uses up ALL of their chances to ever mingle with society again. To me this is clearly one of those instances. There is no death penalty violent or painfull enough to make amends for this man's actions.

I am opposed simply because I do not want to feed and clothe them for the rest of their lives. Off with their heads and be done with them since society has no intent on ever letting them out. Thin the herd, if you will.

MojoMan
06-24-2012, 12:27 PM
In my case, I think that he gets out of having to live with his guilt, if he is truly able to do that, if he kills or even if society kills him or places him in a situation to be killed. Death is an easy way out on the human level. I am guessing that every person he molested over the years did not come foward and those that did had to re-live a terrible secret that shaped who they were. Sandusky got to live (falsely) as a well-respected, well-connected member of the community. Honestly, I believe that he is never really going to pay properly.

That is a pretty compelling answer. However, I doubt that is the justification that the legal authorities are using for establishing a suicide watch over Sandusky and placing him in protective custody.

What your argument amounts to is that allowing him to die is an act of mercy for Sandusky at this point. I can see that. Nevertheless, I do not believe the legal authorities should be responsible for this beyond taking some minimal, reasonable precautions.

It is not desirable for anyone to commit suicide, but it is also should not be the responsibility of any other person or institution to make sure another person refrains from killing themselves.

ArlingtonTexan
06-24-2012, 12:52 PM
That is a pretty compelling answer. However, I doubt that is the justification that the legal authorities are using for establishing a suicide watch over Sandusky and placing him in protective custody.

What your argument amounts to is that allowing him to die is an act of mercy for Sandusky at this point. I can see that. Nevertheless, I do not believe the legal authorities should be responsible for this beyond taking some minimal, reasonable precautions.

It is not desirable for anyone to commit suicide, but it is also should not be the responsibility of any other person or institution to make sure another person refrains from killing themselves.

In the broadest sense, I don't really know what 'suicide watch' entails in that state (see below) so I can't say if the precautions are reasonal beyond what another prisoner gets. A cell with a camera and somebody walking by a couple more times a day sounds reasonable, so of the more extreme suicide watches are animalistic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide_watch

Showtime100
06-24-2012, 01:02 PM
In the broadest sense, I don't really know what 'suicide watch' entails in that state (see below) so I can't say if the precautions are reasonal beyond what another prisoner gets. A cell with a camera and somebody walking by a couple more times a day sounds reasonable, so of the more extreme suicide watches are animalistic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide_watch

I don't either, but I think in Jerry Sandusky's case it goes something like this....

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r65/ShowtimeN15580/Pet%20Funny%20Misc/suicidewatch.jpg

Topher
06-24-2012, 01:20 PM
This mofo deserves the Judas Cradle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judas_cradle

CloakNNNdagger
06-24-2012, 04:05 PM
A tactic for the purpose of leaving an appeal (or plea deal) open in a virtually hopeless defense case?? Even if not, may waste a heck of a lot more tax payer money.

Damaging comments by Sandusky's lawyer could help on appeal, experts say (http://www.myfoxphilly.com/story/18866485/damaging-comments-by-sanduskys-lawyer-could-help-on-appeal-experts-say)
Jun 24, 2012 12:25 PM CDT

Source: New York Post
NEW YORK -- Damaging comments by a lawyer for Jerry Sandusky could help the convicted Penn State child molester on appeal, according to veteran New York defense lawyers.

"He had an ethical obligation to represent his client as zealously as possible," said Manhattan defense lawyer Lori Cohen. "It's hard to reconcile a zealous defense with his public comments."

In a shocking statement before the verdict Friday, defense attorney Joe Amendola said he would "die of a heart attack" if his client were acquitted of all charges.

"That's just crazy," said Douglas Burns, a defense lawyer with 26 years in the courtroom. "A lawyer has got to keep his cards close to his vest and not make comments like that."

Hours after the football coach's conviction on 45 counts of child sexual abuse, Amendola praised the prosecution for handling the case in an "exemplary manner" and said he didn't "have any problem with the jury's verdict."

If Sandusky, 68, hires another attorney, claiming Amendola was ineffective could benefit him on appeal.

Burns said there's a 60 percent chance a claim of "ineffective counsel" could help Sandusky.

The new lawyer would have to prove that Amendola's defense of the case was below legal standards, and that an effective defense could have resulted in a not-guilty verdict.

Sandusky, who was on suicide watch Saturday, faces a sentence of up to 442 years when he is sentenced in three months. Amendola has already promised to appeal.

He and Sandusky's other attorney, Karl Rominger, said Saturday that they requested to withdraw from the case before the trial but were turned down.

"We told the trial court, the Superior Court and the Supreme Court we were not prepared to proceed to trial in June due to numerous issues," Amendola said.

CloakNNNdagger
06-24-2012, 04:14 PM
Sandusky's attorneys wanted to back out from the case at the very beginning, saying that they did not have enough time to prepare for the trial. Doesn't seem like "time" was the problem.


Sandusky lawyers raise appeal issue on timing (http://www.bostonherald.com/news/national/northeast/view/20120624sandusky_lawyers_raise_appeal_issue_on_tim ing/)

StarStruck
06-25-2012, 12:26 PM
Jerry Sandusky is on suicide watch at the county jail and is being held in protective custody.

It may not be politically correct to say this, but why is it important to keep him from committing suicide if he wants to? He is almost certainly going to die in prison. The only question remaining is when. So, it is just a matter of timing. And when he eventually does die in prison, it his hard to imagine very many people being saddened by his passing.

I just don't get this. Of course it would be wrong to encourage him to kill himself or to put him in a situation where another prisoner was likely to kill him. But if he really was dead set on ending his own life, why should anyone feel compelled to interfere with that?

I understand your question and have raised the same one myself. I am having problems understanding how his wife could have been clueless for years, especially after their own adopted son came forth as a victim. I can't say she approved, but I don't believe that she didn't know or question the behavior or rumors.

Blake
06-25-2012, 12:28 PM
Being on suicide watch, doesn't mean he is considering suicide.

Honoring Earl 34
06-25-2012, 01:18 PM
Jerry's getting serenaded .

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/inmates-taunt-jerry-sandusky-pink-floyd-lyrics-hey-teacher-leave-kids-article-1.1101791

Dutchrudder
06-25-2012, 01:45 PM
Anyone who watched the Bob Costas interview should have realized Sandusky's lawyer was a buffoon. He clearly was not coached for that interview. This snippet was just ridiculous: http://youtu.be/bbSaFP_oNEc?t=58s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbSaFP_oNEc)

I hope prison is just the beginning of hell for this guy.

Texan_Bill
06-25-2012, 08:31 PM
I understand your question and have raised the same one myself. I am having problems understanding how his wife could have been clueless for years, especially after their own adopted son came forth as a victim. I can't say she approved, but I don't believe that she didn't know or question the behavior or rumors.

Da Nile isn't just a river in Egypt. She (while may have not known intimate deals) certainly had to suspect something was amiss.

Texan_Bill
06-25-2012, 08:36 PM
Anyone who watched the Bob Costas interview should have realized Sandusky's lawyer was a buffoon. He clearly was not coached for that interview. This snippet was just ridiculous: http://youtu.be/bbSaFP_oNEc?t=58s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbSaFP_oNEc)

I hope prison is just the beginning of hell for this guy.

His attorney was a buffoon for not denying the interview or strongly suggesting to his client to not to do the interview altogether. If I was the attorney and Sandusky adamantly wanted to the interview after my advice not to, I would've removed myself from the case, citing attorney-client differences.

I'm no attorney, nor do I play one on TV, but this seems like "Law 101".

Double Barrel
06-26-2012, 11:08 AM
I agree. And that is exactly why I want the Penn State football program to die. Sick bastards do what sick bastards do. It's an unfortunate part of reality. The fact that supposedly upstanding, Christian men covered for and/or turned their head to this is actually worse IMO, because they are NOT sick. JoePa was perfectly sane and still let this happen. The AD chose not to pursue it because of the potential black eye. Even the assistant coach that stumbled upon it didn't do everything he should have done.

The failure in the system was not that a mentally deranged bastard did what he did, but rather that perfectly sane and supposedly moral protectorates of young men let it go unchecked.

I agree with you wholeheartedly about the death penalty for Penn State's football program. And they should take it a step further and demolish that training facility where these despicable and vile acts occurred. Nuke the entire joint and pave it over or dedicate a park to victims of child abuse.

But under no circumstance should the school be allowed to continue a program that systematically turned it's back on atrocious abuse of children. That it went on for so long will tarnish Penn State for as long as I'm alive.

Honoring Earl 34
06-26-2012, 12:39 PM
I agree with you wholeheartedly about the death penalty for Penn State's football program. And they should take it a step further and demolish that training facility where these despicable and vile acts occurred. Nuke the entire joint and pave it over or dedicate a park to victims of child abuse.

But under no circumstance should the school be allowed to continue a program that systematically turned it's back on atrocious abuse of children. That it went on for so long will tarnish Penn State for as long as I'm alive.

I guess if the banks were to big to fail then PSU football was to big to tell .

TimeKiller
06-26-2012, 05:38 PM
The sad thing here is there ARE no winners.

I don't know. Jerry Sandusky seems to be making it out pretty well. I mean look at what he did and we're trying to figure out a way to keep him safe, well fed, housed, clothed and alive.

Blake
07-12-2012, 11:09 AM
Report finds Penn State concealed abuse, disregarded victims' safety

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/ncaa/07/12/penn-state-freeh-report-sandusky-paterno.ap/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t11_a0

gwallaia
07-12-2012, 12:07 PM
Very scathing report; I wonder what penalties if any Penn State will face. SMU got the death penalty years ago for something far less serious, but I think Penn State will get off because they are viewed as too big and important to college football to get the death penalty.

Double Barrel
07-12-2012, 12:09 PM
Report finds Penn State concealed abuse, disregarded victims' safety

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/ncaa/07/12/penn-state-freeh-report-sandusky-paterno.ap/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t11_a0

And there you go. Paterno wasn't insulated from what was going on. This clearly reveals him to be a part of the problem. The whole bunch of them are just morally bankrupt people.

ArlingtonTexan
07-12-2012, 12:39 PM
http://i.cdn.turner.com/si/.element/img/4.0/global/swapper/201207/120712.01.pdf

Full report (pdf) for those who have time or speed read.

ArlingtonTexan
07-12-2012, 12:50 PM
tvs-at-psu-student-center-suddenly-change-channels-away-from-freeh-announcement

A press conference from lead investigator Louis Freeh – which you can watch HERE — was about to air on CNN. Large TVs in the Penn State student center were tuned in to the channel. But then, something happened, per the Philadelphia Inquirer

But, just as an anchor was ready to speak about the report, the television screens suddenly went blank. They then turned to a public access channel featuring a reporter from The Morning Call newspaper in Allentown about the state budget.

eriadoc
07-12-2012, 01:48 PM
And there you go. Paterno wasn't insulated from what was going on. This clearly reveals him to be a part of the problem. The whole bunch of them are just morally bankrupt people.

From the article linked above:

Some of the report's most damning evidence against Paterno consists of handwritten notes and emails that portray him as being involved with a decision by the officials not to tell child welfare authorities about the 2001 encounter.

Spanier, Schultz and Curley drew up a plan that called for reporting Sandusky to the state Department of Child Welfare. But Curley later said in an email that he changed his mind about the plan "after giving it more thought and talking it over with Joe."

Spanier concurred but noted "the only downside for us is if the message isn't (heard) and acted upon and we then become vulnerable for not having reported it."

The emails also show Paterno closely followed the 1998 allegation.

As I have said before, the actions of Paterno, Spanier, and Curley are as bad or even worse than Sandusky's. Sandusky is clearly mentally ill, but those men are/were perfectly sane, rational people that deliberated and then chose to allow it to continue. That is despicable. Frankly, I can't even think of a strong enough word. Sandusky and the whole lot of them needs to die in a freakin' fire. And the Penn St. football program needs to be permanently shut down.


tvs-at-psu-student-center-suddenly-change-channels-away-from-freeh-announcement

A press conference from lead investigator Louis Freeh – which you can watch HERE — was about to air on CNN. Large TVs in the Penn State student center were tuned in to the channel. But then, something happened, per the Philadelphia Inquirer

But, just as an anchor was ready to speak about the report, the television screens suddenly went blank. They then turned to a public access channel featuring a reporter from The Morning Call newspaper in Allentown about the state budget.

LOL, and they're still covering things up. That's just amazing.

GlassHalfFull
07-12-2012, 02:00 PM
From the SI Link

Freeh said officials had opportunities in 1998 and 2001 to step in.

Sexual abuse might have been prevented if university officials had banned Sandusky from bringing children onto campus after a 1998 inquiry, the report said. Despite their knowledge of the police probe into Sandusky showering with a boy in a football locker room, Spanier, Paterno, Curley and Schultz took no action to limit his access to campus, the report said.

Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/ncaa/07/12/penn-state-freeh-report-sandusky-paterno.ap/index.html#ixzz20QrMiHV9


The bolded statement bugs me for some reason. Banning Sandusky from bringing children onto campus wouldn't have stopped the abuse. Turning him into the authorities was the only way to do that. He would have just found another venue.

It seems to me that some people still aren't getting it.

eriadoc
07-12-2012, 02:19 PM
The bolded statement bugs me for some reason. Banning Sandusky from bringing children onto campus wouldn't have stopped the abuse. Turning him into the authorities was the only way to do that. He would have just found another venue.

It seems to me that some people still aren't getting it.

Exactly. And it seems to me that people still aren't viewing the accomplice angle as seriously as they should. I don't know that there has been a news story that has made me this angry in a very long time.

Double Barrel
07-12-2012, 02:20 PM
From the article linked above:

Some of the report's most damning evidence against Paterno consists of handwritten notes and emails that portray him as being involved with a decision by the officials not to tell child welfare authorities about the 2001 encounter.

Spanier, Schultz and Curley drew up a plan that called for reporting Sandusky to the state Department of Child Welfare. But Curley later said in an email that he changed his mind about the plan "after giving it more thought and talking it over with Joe."

Spanier concurred but noted "the only downside for us is if the message isn't (heard) and acted upon and we then become vulnerable for not having reported it."

The emails also show Paterno closely followed the 1998 allegation.


As I have said before, the actions of Paterno, Spanier, and Curley are as bad or even worse than Sandusky's. Sandusky is clearly mentally ill, but those men are/were perfectly sane, rational people that deliberated and then chose to allow it to continue. That is despicable. Frankly, I can't even think of a strong enough word. Sandusky and the whole lot of them needs to die in a freakin' fire. And the Penn St. football program needs to be permanently shut down.


My thoughts, as well. Now there is not even the slightest doubt that Paterno knew, and not only did he know, he actively participated in the cover-up in order to protect his career and institution. He's a despicable P.O.S. human being along with the rest of them.

And if they continue to "honor" him with statues and the like, I think the entire university, staff, and student body need a serious gut check and deep soul search to figure out what is truly important in life. The lack of honor and the void of just common decency is revealing of a culture that values the wrong things in this world.

No only should they nuke the football program, they need to just demolish the buildings that Sandusky used to commit these heinous acts. I do not comprehend how a student athlete can use the place and not be completely repulsed by all of it.

gwallaia
07-12-2012, 02:23 PM
My Coogs should have left their foot on the pedal in the 2nd half of the bowl game against Penn State back in January. We could have easily put 60+ on those guys.

eriadoc
07-12-2012, 02:24 PM
I do not comprehend how a student athlete can use the place and not be completely repulsed by all of it.

Eewww.

I probably need to permanently check out of this thread. This would be one of those threads I'd put on ignore if such a forum feature existed.

HoustonFrog
07-12-2012, 02:33 PM
Did anyone see Matt Millen on ESPN earlier? If you didn't just go to Twitter and type his name and you'll see the reaction. His reaction is what disturbs me so much about all of this. These people can't rationally think about what happened without defending Paterno, like somehow it wasn't that bad and that everyone makes mistakes. It's unreal. His statements today made his tenure as Lions GM seem successful.

The1ApplePie
07-12-2012, 03:11 PM
PSU is looking at the death penalty.

Of course I bet they still get off lighter than Reggie and USC did.:foottap:

And yeah, the whole Cult of JoePa thing is getting very creepy.

2012Champs
07-12-2012, 03:47 PM
Did anyone see Matt Millen on ESPN earlier? If you didn't just go to Twitter and type his name and you'll see the reaction. His reaction is what disturbs me so much about all of this. These people can't rationally think about what happened without defending Paterno, like somehow it wasn't that bad and that everyone makes mistakes. It's unreal. His statements today made his tenure as Lions GM seem successful.



Was that who was on Mike and Mike around 8:30 this morning? There was a Penn St football alum on talking about how great Joe was and how all of this just doesnt make sense because Joe was so "by the rules" it was and is still sick

Blake
07-12-2012, 03:47 PM
Did anyone see Matt Millen on ESPN earlier? If you didn't just go to Twitter and type his name and you'll see the reaction. His reaction is what disturbs me so much about all of this. These people can't rationally think about what happened without defending Paterno, like somehow it wasn't that bad and that everyone makes mistakes. It's unreal. His statements today made his tenure as Lions GM seem successful.

"Matt Millen. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."

Double Barrel
07-12-2012, 04:09 PM
Did anyone see Matt Millen on ESPN earlier? If you didn't just go to Twitter and type his name and you'll see the reaction. His reaction is what disturbs me so much about all of this. These people can't rationally think about what happened without defending Paterno, like somehow it wasn't that bad and that everyone makes mistakes. It's unreal. His statements today made his tenure as Lions GM seem successful.

He's getting ripped about his reaction now.

This guy rants on Millen (deservedly so, imo):

ESPN Trots Out Matt Millen To Fumble His Way Through The Freeh Report (http://deadspin.com/5925472/espn-trots-out-matt-millen-to-tard-his-way-through-the-freeh-report)

The Detroit Free Press, obviously in tune with Millen like we are about Casserly, looks to be trying to get him fired from ESPN:

Matt Millen ripped for his take on Penn State report (http://www.freep.com/article/20120712/SPORTS01/120712035/matt-millen-joe-paterno-espn-penn-state?odyssey=tab%7Ctopnews%7Ctext%7CFRONTPAGE)

What an idiotic decision by ESPN to put Millen out there, because the guy lacks any sense of objectivity due to his obvious man-crush on Paterno.


PSU is looking at the death penalty.

Of course I bet they still get off lighter than Reggie and USC did.:foottap:

And yeah, the whole Cult of JoePa thing is getting very creepy.

You got that right. It's almost like the Moonies or something, completely unable to comprehend reality outside of the bubble.

At some point they have to figure out that there is absolutely nothing about their precious school that is more important than this story and ensuing cover-up for so many years.

Texan_Bill
07-12-2012, 09:54 PM
My best "tweet" of the day on Travis Rodger's show (which he didn't give me credit for) was something like this:


[paraphrased]
It's a good thing this didn't happen in Texas because JoePa's body would be exhumed so that the state could execute him.....

HoustonFrog
07-13-2012, 10:00 AM
Was that who was on Mike and Mike around 8:30 this morning? There was a Penn St football alum on talking about how great Joe was and how all of this just doesnt make sense because Joe was so "by the rules" it was and is still sick

It was on TV(ESPN) when the report first came out. He was one of the first people they trotted out. No sense of reality. I blame ESPN as much as him because they knew he would have no impartiality.

He's getting ripped about his reaction now.

This guy rants on Millen (deservedly so, imo):

ESPN Trots Out Matt Millen To Fumble His Way Through The Freeh Report (http://deadspin.com/5925472/espn-trots-out-matt-millen-to-tard-his-way-through-the-freeh-report)

The Detroit Free Press, obviously in tune with Millen like we are about Casserly, looks to be trying to get him fired from ESPN:

Matt Millen ripped for his take on Penn State report (http://www.freep.com/article/20120712/SPORTS01/120712035/matt-millen-joe-paterno-espn-penn-state?odyssey=tab%7Ctopnews%7Ctext%7CFRONTPAGE)

What an idiotic decision by ESPN to put Millen out there, because the guy lacks any sense of objectivity due to his obvious man-crush on Paterno.



.

Agree with everything here. I had seen the deadspin article but not the other one. Thanks!Millen has no business commenting on this or anything GM related.

TimeKiller
07-13-2012, 10:36 AM
Penn St. should never be allowed to field a football team again. Death penalty of the highest order. Lay waste to the stadium, the lockerrooms, the offices, the statues, the record books, all of it. Anything that Paterno built, destroy it so that Paterno's family, Penn St. or anyone else even remotely involved won't see another dime from it. Football may only be revenue to schools, it may only be a job to some but to us....football is sacred. The gridirons are hallowed grounds, where our gladiators rumble, the spirit of competition is embraced and all else is forgotten for an afternoon. These people have bastardized all of it beyond what words can describe. All they've done is remind us that there is no depth too low, no pit too black, no evil too despicable to commit.

Blake
07-13-2012, 04:48 PM
"I enjoy young people"

Those words still make me shudder. I couldn't imagine having my favorite program be attached at the hip to some scum like Sandusky, including the cover-up administration in addition to Paterno. The arrogance and

For someone like Paterno (who everyone suggests always did the right thing, and is nothing but a good person) to turn a blind eye to child abuse to protect a freaking brand is astounding. It really makes you wonder if ANYONE'S honor and integrity can be compromised if the price is high enough.

I think Penn State Football AT LEAST should get the death penalty. But I fear they will weasel out of it somehow. I am sure Penn State alumni include some powerful people. And we all know that when it comes down to it, money talks and abused children walk.

BullBlitz
07-13-2012, 10:26 PM
Penn St. should never be allowed to field a football team again. Death penalty of the highest order. Lay waste to the stadium, the lockerrooms, the offices, the statues, the record books, all of it. Anything that Paterno built, destroy it so that Paterno's family, Penn St. or anyone else even remotely involved won't see another dime from it. Football may only be revenue to schools, it may only be a job to some but to us....football is sacred. The gridirons are hallowed grounds, where our gladiators rumble, the spirit of competition is embraced and all else is forgotten for an afternoon. These people have bastardized all of it beyond what words can describe. All they've done is remind us that there is no depth too low, no pit too black, no evil too despicable to commit.

"hallowed grounds", "gladiators". Get a life. It's a game.

Blake
07-16-2012, 01:01 PM
Of course they do...

Paterno family denies Louis Freeh report findings

http://www.chron.com/sports/article/Paterno-family-denies-Louis-Freeh-report-findings-3709996.php

GlassHalfFull
07-16-2012, 01:07 PM
I wonder if Paterno being Catholic had anything to do with his attitude about child molestation.

Since his church has covered for priests for years, maybe he just thought that was the appropriate way to handle it.

Honoring Earl 34
07-16-2012, 01:09 PM
I've come to the conclusion that the remaining culprits should have two choices .

1. Give PSU the death penalty

2. PSU gets to keep football and y'all get 20 years in prison

Blake
07-16-2012, 01:09 PM
I wonder if Paterno being Catholic had anything to do with his attitude about child molestation.

Since his church has covered for priests for years, maybe he just thought that was the appropriate way to handle it.

I hope that was a joke, because it was a pretty lame comment otherwise.

GlassHalfFull
07-16-2012, 01:13 PM
I hope that was a joke, because it was a pretty lame comment otherwise.

I realize that comment may have been offensive to Catholics on the board, but I think it is a consideration.

I actually do wonder if that had a bearing on his behavior. Maybe not, maybe it was pure unchecked ego that made Paterno willing to cover up child molestation rather than tarnish the Penn State program. But I see some parallels in motive between the church covering for priests and Paterno covering for Sandusky.

Playoffs
07-16-2012, 01:14 PM
Of course they do...

Paterno family denies Louis Freeh report findings

http://www.chron.com/sports/article/Paterno-family-denies-Louis-Freeh-report-findings-3709996.php

"It can certainly be asserted that Joe Paterno could have done more. He acknowledged this himself last fall," the family statement said. "But to claim that he knowingly, intentionally protected a pedophile is false."If you report a crime to your superiors -- instead of the proper authoririties -- and nothing is done about it ...

And you, in turn, do nothing further to make the police aware of the crime .....

You are concealing the crime & protecting the criminal & potentially creating new victims.

It's not just football ... it's a big money-maker for the school. Hence the cover-up.

NitroGSXR
07-16-2012, 01:16 PM
I wonder if Paterno being Catholic had anything to do with his attitude about child molestation.

Since his church has covered for priests for years, maybe he just thought that was the appropriate way to handle it.

Yeah... the prison priests fight over who gets to hear Sandusky's weekly confession.

:lion:

NitroGSXR
07-16-2012, 01:35 PM
Sandusky continues to receive his state retirement package.

http://www.bostonherald.com/sports/college/football/view.bg?articleid=1061146192&format=&page=2&listingType=colfb#articleFull

Any thoughts? I'm really sickened by this... could it be possible to strip him of this or at least partially? I hate to hear that he's living off money that he made abusing these kids.

Playoffs
07-16-2012, 01:37 PM
Interesting retweet from LZ:

Joe Paterno in 1987 about SMU's football scandal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Methodist_University_football_scandal):

"It's unbelievable to think that kind of corruption came right from the top of the power structure."

Texan_Bill
07-16-2012, 02:04 PM
Interesting retweet from LZ:

Joe Paterno in 1987 about SMU's football scandal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Methodist_University_football_scandal):

"It's unbelievable to think that kind of corruption came right from the top of the power structure."

:potkettle:

CloakNNNdagger
07-22-2012, 08:48 AM
University: Paterno statue to be removed (http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/22/us/penn-state-paterno-statue/)
By the CNN Wire Staff
updated 8:25 AM EDT, Sun July 22, 2012

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/120719031944-nr-paterno-statue-removal-00001204-story-top.jpg

(CNN) -- The statue of the late Penn State football coach Joe Paterno outside the campus' football stadium will be removed, the university's president said Sunday.

The tribute to Paterno had become an object of contention after the child rape scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

Paterno's statue and legacy came under fire after the release of the Freeh Report, the scathing investigation led by former FBI Director Louis Freeh.

Penn State board member resigns over Sandusky scandal

The report found several Penn State officials concealed evidence that Sandusky had sexually abused minors. Freeh concluded that Paterno could have prevented further sexual abuse had he taken action. Sandusky was convicted of 45 counts of child sexual abuse involving 10 victims.

"I now believe that, contrary to its original intention, coach Paterno's statue has become a source of division and an obstacle to healing in our university and beyond," University President Rodney Erickson said in a statement.

The 900-pound bronze statue, outside Beaver Stadium, will be stored in a "secure location."

NCAA not ruling out tough sanctions on Penn State football

"I believe that, were it to remain, the statue will be a recurring wound to the multitude of individuals across the nation and beyond who have been the victims of child abuse," he added.

On Sunday, Penn State employees began placing fencing around the statue, as well as a tarp. Local and university police were at the scene, and some students have gathered near the stadium.

Another tribute to Paterno -- the university library that bears his name -- will remain as it is, Erickson said.

"The library remains a tribute to Joe and Sue Paterno's commitment to Penn State's student body and academic success, and it highlights the positive impacts coach Paterno had on the university," he wrote.

As of this post, CNN and Fox News is reporting the the statue has been removed.

jaayteetx
07-22-2012, 09:08 AM
Right move to remove the statue, I can't believe he still has blind loyalty by some at this point. Sad case all the way around, but especially for the victims who could've been sparred if those in charge would've acted like they should have.

silvrhand
07-22-2012, 10:45 AM
NCAA is supposed to deliver the death penalty today:

I disagree with this for a couple reasons, now don't shoot me cause what happened at Penn State is completely wrong and inexcusable. The people that are responsible this should be punished not the 1000's of students that will be impacted by the loss of revenue.

School should have to setup a fund that half it's revenue ever year go to for the next 10-15 years to sponsor kids of abuse. This would allow the current students to continue their tradition which has nothing to do with the cover up. I feel it's wrong to cover penalize 1000's of student for the decisions of the ones involved in the cover up.

Everyone of them should be in jail.

Goldensilence
07-22-2012, 11:01 AM
Per ESPN front page it says "unprecedented" sanctions will be delivered monday.

I am sure the death penalty will be a possibility, I have a feeling though they will do everything short of it sadly.

I think the death penalty would be good for both sides in moving forward.

Stemp
07-22-2012, 11:12 AM
Someone suggested making their football program non-scholarship for 4 years.
That would be as effective as the the death penalty but could be applied since the death penalty requires the program to already been under restrictions or on probation

Heath Shuler
07-22-2012, 11:25 AM
http://media.centredaily.com/smedia/2012/07/22/07/45/UQ7uz.AuSt.42.jpg

b0ng
07-22-2012, 12:25 PM
Joe Schad of ESPN was saying the bowl ban will be 3+ years.

http://i.imgur.com/nHugC.jpg

Playoffs
07-22-2012, 12:31 PM
Sums it up for me...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cOlwnJ24AE

gwallaia
07-22-2012, 12:46 PM
Harsh penalties coming down on Penn State from NCAA but no death penalty. Some are saying worse than death penalty.

Loss of scholarships and multi-year bowl bans for starters.


http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/22/us/penn-state-paterno-statue/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

gwallaia
07-23-2012, 09:13 AM
I just watched the live video feed from the NCAA.

Highlights of the sanctions.

* $60 million dollar fine
* No Bowl games or post-season for 4 years
* Vacate all victories from 1998 - 2011.

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/8191027/penn-state-hit-60-million-fine-4-year-bowl-ban-wins-dating-1998

Blake
07-23-2012, 09:22 AM
Some are saying worse than death penalty.

I just watched the live video feed from the NCAA.

Highlights of the sanctions.

* $60 million dollar fine
* No Bowl games or post-season for 4 years
* Vacate all victories from 1998 - 2011.

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/8191027/penn-state-hit-60-million-fine-4-year-bowl-ban-wins-dating-1998

I would have to disagree. No bowl games sucks, but they will still continue to recruit and field a good team. Just look at USC. They had a 2 year bowl ban and are still kicking ass as a football team. Hell, their QB is a potential #1 overall pick in the NFL draft next year.

Death penalty forces a school to start a team again from scratch. So is it harsh? Yes. Worse than the death penalty? No.

gwallaia
07-23-2012, 09:26 AM
They are also losing a huge amount of scholarships for 4 years.

Texan_Bill
07-23-2012, 09:27 AM
Bobby Bowden is now the all-time winningest coach in NCAA history. All of Paterno's wins from '98 on are all now vacated.

HTown2ATX
07-23-2012, 09:28 AM
PSU just became Austin Community College

Students can transfer with no penalty, loss of 10 scholarships, $60 million fine, all wins 1998-2011 vacated and more.

Stemp
07-23-2012, 09:31 AM
That will likely shut down their program for a few years

CloakNNNdagger
07-23-2012, 09:39 AM
PSU just became Austin Community College

Students can transfer with no penalty, loss of 10 scholarships, $60 million fine, all wins 1998-2011 vacated and more.


They should be forced to pay for student transfers and any losses those students may have incurred having/wanting to do so.

Hervoyel
07-23-2012, 09:56 AM
NCAA is supposed to deliver the death penalty today:

I disagree with this for a couple reasons, now don't shoot me cause what happened at Penn State is completely wrong and inexcusable. The people that are responsible this should be punished not the 1000's of students that will be impacted by the loss of revenue.

School should have to setup a fund that half it's revenue ever year go to for the next 10-15 years to sponsor kids of abuse. This would allow the current students to continue their tradition which has nothing to do with the cover up. I feel it's wrong to cover penalize 1000's of student for the decisions of the ones involved in the cover up.

Everyone of them should be in jail.

I'm entirely OK with the death penalty and I think I'm on record around here somewhere as being originally against it for much the same reasons that you pointed out.

Now I think it's reasonable. I've changed my mind because I think that it is very important that no school ever again think that it's athletic program and its image be more important than doing the right thing.

Penn State will be made an example of and I promise you that after what's been revealed and what is to come no other school will be stupid enough to try and sweep a pedophile under the rug to keep their program safe and their reputation unsoiled.

....or no they won't. Just caught up and see what's happening. This works too. They're getting pounded as they should be. I still would not have minded the death penalty.

pbat488
07-23-2012, 09:57 AM
the penalties hurt, no doubt. but not as bad as what I was expecting.

four year bowl ban will scare off recruits, and the reduction in scholarships hurt. but no suspension of football operations and no TV ban (scared it will hurt other teams) especially make this a punishment bereft of some of the teeth it could've had.

Hervoyel
07-23-2012, 10:05 AM
Well, this way hopefully every school they play will beat the living crap out of them. Maybe this is better than the death penalty? If the program had gone into hibernation it would possibly have come out of "hibernation" with all these Penn State JoPa fans having their day in the sun when football returned. Now they get to do the four years of sucking like nobody there could possibly imagine. Losing is hard on fans and a program. Losing like they're going to lose will keep recruits away a lot longer than just the limits on scholarships. They'll carry that stink with them for a while and maybe that will hurt those people up there as much as any death penalty might.

gwallaia
07-23-2012, 10:17 AM
Good points Herv. PSU will not be able to hang their heads in shame in private, the humiliation will be public for everyone to see.

b0ng
07-23-2012, 10:35 AM
Not really a death penalty (Certainly not worse than a death penalty) but it is harsher than what USC got. No decent recruit is going to want to play there for the next few years.

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 10:37 AM
Not really a death penalty (Certainly not worse than a death penalty) but it is harsher than what USC got. No decent recruit is going to want to play there for the next few years.

Yep. They got the Walking Dead penalty. It's best for the NCAA, the school and their conference to keep them somewhat alive during their sentence. This way they field a team, get reamed for a few years, keep the program together, and after a half dozen or so years of terrible football they will be able to rebuild.

steelbtexan
07-23-2012, 10:44 AM
They should be forced to pay for student transfers and any losses those students may have incurred having/wanting to do so.

Agreed

They should've gotten the death penalty. This tells me no team will ever get the death penalty again.

NCAA thought process, Paying players> Child molestation

Glad to see Paternos win record taken away tough. May all involved in this mess spend many yrs in jail. Paterno got the easy way out by dying. IMHO

steelbtexan
07-23-2012, 10:49 AM
Yep. They got the Walking Dead penalty. It's best for the NCAA, the school and their conference to keep them somewhat alive during their sentence. This way they field a team, get reamed for a few years, keep the program together, and after a half dozen or so years of terrible football they will be able to rebuild.

What if they're team is back to being a championship contender in 5 yrs?

I wanted them to have to go the 2 and a half decades of suck that SMU has had to go through. The death penalty certianly changed SMU's priorities and would've done the same to Penn St.

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 11:11 AM
What if they're team is back to being a championship contender in 5 yrs?

I wanted them to have to go the 2 and a half decades of suck that SMU has had to go through. The death penalty certianly changed SMU's priorities and would've done the same to Penn St.



Im not sure the issues at Penn St and SMU can be compared at all. Even more so when you talk about NCAA rule violations and what not. While Im not against punishment in the Penn case the NCAA certainly changed the rules it opperates by in order to do anything in this case and lets not forget its better for the NCAA for Penn not to get wipped off the map for 20+ years

Hookem Horns
07-23-2012, 11:19 AM
I wish the Big 10 would kick them out of the conference and have them relegated to some small insignificant conference.

Edit: this could already on the table. Kudos to the Big 10 if they do this.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1265004-big-ten-football-if-kicking-out-penn-state-is-on-the-table-put-it-to-a-vote

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 11:42 AM
What if they're team is back to being a championship contender in 5 yrs?

I wanted them to have to go the 2 and a half decades of suck that SMU has had to go through. The death penalty certianly changed SMU's priorities and would've done the same to Penn St.

Why does it matter if they compete in 5 years? If they can do it, great, but the penalties aren't meant to hurt them beyond the 4 years stipulated.

The NCAA just laid a beatdown on the football program, they will have exactly 3 more scholarships than D2 schools at any given time. No one will want to go there after this, besides PSU alums children and local kids. Not only that, they now have a 60 million dollar fine and a loss of bowl revenue (13 million) to deal with. This football program will not be on its feet any time soon. I think the punishment was appropriate.

steelbtexan
07-23-2012, 11:52 AM
Why does it matter if they compete in 5 years? If they can do it, great, but the penalties aren't meant to hurt them beyond the 4 years stipulated.

The NCAA just laid a beatdown on the football program, they will have exactly 3 more scholarships than D2 schools at any given time. No one will want to go there after this, besides PSU alums children and local kids. Not only that, they now have a 60 million dollar fine and a loss of bowl revenue (13 million) to deal with. This football program will not be on its feet any time soon. I think the punishment was appropriate.

I get what you're saying.

but I want the penalty to be the harshest in NCAA history. I would set a prescedent that an NCAA institution that knowingly allows children to be molested will suffer the worst consequences possible. This would be the ultimate deterrent in keeping an act like this from happening again.

The tought of a coach raping a child in the showers, (At the fielhouse or not) sickens me to no end. If this isn't the worst case of institutional control possible, I cant imagine a worse case, hence the death penalty.

Playoffs
07-23-2012, 12:01 PM
Highlights of the sanctions.

* $60 million dollar fine

I heard that $60 million is about what the football program clears in just one year.

FirstTexansFan
07-23-2012, 12:03 PM
I get what you're saying.

but I want the penalty to be the harshest in NCAA history. I would set a prescedent that an NCAA institution that knowingly allows children to be molested will suffer the worst consequences possible. This would be the ultimate deterrent in keeping an act like this from happening again.

The tought of a coach raping a child in the showers, (At the fielhouse or not) sickens me to no end. If this isn't the worst case of institutional control possible, I cant imagine a worse case, hence the death penalty.

I've got to agree with you, SMU's violations were worse than allowing 20yrs of pedophilia? I'm sorry, they should tear the stadium down!

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 12:16 PM
I heard that $60 million is about what the football program clears in just one year.



I dont think that is profit I think its revenue however either way taking away a full years worth a greatly impacting their ability to generate future revenue certainly makes the final financial impact greater

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 12:18 PM
I've got to agree with you, SMU's violations were worse than allowing 20yrs of pedophilia? I'm sorry, they should tear the stadium down!



The NCAA nor the police have the authority to tear down the stadium.

Texan_Bill
07-23-2012, 12:24 PM
I heard that $60 million is about what the football program clears in just one year.

Pretty close.

http://static6.businessinsider.com/image/4e832e42ecad046c20000057/college-football-top-revenue-programs.jpg

Those numbers are just revenue (no expenses).

Playoffs
07-23-2012, 12:33 PM
Those numbers are just revenue (no expenses).
PSU cleared $53,228,446 from football in 2010/2011.

http://businessofcollegesports.com/2011/12/28/top-50-most-profitable-fbs-football-and-mens-basketball-programs/

Wolf6151
07-23-2012, 01:15 PM
Penn St. raised 200 mil. from alumni last year alone, during the scandal. A 60 mil. penalty is nothing.


They should have gotten the death penalty.

Double Barrel
07-23-2012, 01:54 PM
http://media.centredaily.com/smedia/2012/07/22/07/45/UQ7uz.AuSt.42.jpg

They should have just turned the statue around, so Paterno was facing the other way. That would have been a pefect symbol of him.

steelbtexan
07-23-2012, 01:57 PM
Im not sure the issues at Penn St and SMU can be compared at all. Even more so when you talk about NCAA rule violations and what not. While Im not against punishment in the Penn case the NCAA certainly changed the rules it opperates by in order to do anything in this case and lets not forget its better for the NCAA for Penn not to get wipped off the map for 20+ years

It's not about what's right for Penn St or the NCAA.

It's about a football legend letting little boys being raped and instead of doing the right thing and turning Sandusky into the police, he allows no telling how many more children to be molested.

Lack of institutional control.

If I were SMU I would start putting players back on the payroll starting next yr. If you aren't even going to lose TV time for letting little boys get raped.

The NCAA is a hypocritical joke. I'm not normally one to want congress to look into sports orgs. But in this case Cogress should not only look into the NCAA as a sanctoining body. It should also do away with the NCAA's rights to be judge and jury over its member institutions.

What do you think would've happened to an institution like UH in a situation like this? You can bet that it would've been far worse for UH.

The NCAA is a joke. But atleast one of the untouchables (Penn St) got a little bit of what should've been coming to them along time ago.

Hagar
07-23-2012, 02:02 PM
Death penelty. Only acceptable punishment.

I was watching one of the sports channels at lunch. The channel focused on a group of students as the penelties were announced. Each student had a look of horror and shook his/her head in disbelief during the announcements. One young lady even cried. I find this attitude hard to accept. These folks need to get thier priorities straight.

MojoMan
07-23-2012, 02:03 PM
Bobby Bowden takes the lead as the most winning NCAA football coach. Joe Paterno falls back to #12.

Paterno loses 111 wins, cedes title to Bowden (http://www.cbssports.com/collegefootball/blog/college-football-rapidreports/19638390/bobby-bowden-takes-top-spot-in-wins)

John Swofford gave his state of the ACC address on Sunday morning at the ACC Kickoff in Greensboro, NC. “Currently, the winningest active FBS coach—Frank Beamer—and basketball coach—Mike Krzyzewski—reside in the ACC.”

Monday morning, NCAA president Mark Emmert announced penalties against Penn State, and former coach Joe Paterno, that strengthen Swofford's statement.

The NCAA vacated all of Penn State's wins from 1998 to 2011. The program will lose 112 victories. Joe Paterno's record got hit hard, too. He will lose 111 victories as a coach, going from 409 career wins to 298, and dropping from first to 12th on the all-time wins list. Former Florida State coach Bobby Bowden is now the all-time leader in FBS coaching wins. Coupled with Duke's Krzyzewski, who passed Bob Knight on the basketball wins list last November, the winningest all-time football and basketball coaches spent much of their careers competing in the ACC.

Bowden coached the Seminoles from 1976 to 2009, following six seasons at the helm of West Virginia. He won 389 games at the FBS level, 377 of which are recognized by the NCAA. He leads the ACC in all-time victories, conference wins, winning percentage, and won twice as many ACC titles as any other coach.

....

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 02:08 PM
It's not about what's right for Penn St or the NCAA.

It's about a football legend letting little boys being raped and instead of doing the right thing and turning Sandusky into the police, he allows no telling how many more children to be molested.

Lack of institutional control.

If I were SMU I would start putting players back on the payroll starting next yr. If you aren't even going to lose TV time for letting little boys get raped.

The NCAA is a hypocritical joke. I'm not normally one to want congress to look into sports orgs. But in this case Cogress should not only look into the NCAA as a sanctoining body. It should also do away with the NCAA's rights to be judge and jury over its member institutions.

What do you think would've happened to an institution like UH in a situation like this? You can bet that it would've been far worse for UH.

The NCAA is a joke. But atleast one of the untouchables (Penn St) got a little bit of what should've been coming to them along time ago.


Did you attend SMU or have some ties to the school? What happend at SMU was something that was a direct violation of the rules that the NCAA had. What happend at Penn St really has nothing to do with the football program or certainly not the football program as it stands today. Sandusky is in jail, Joe is dead and I think the other two officials should have charges being filed if they havent already. What happend at Penn St is criminal and is being delt with as such, however the NCAA changing its rules and power to level punishment in this case is purely because of public outcry. I have no dog in the fight and couldnt care less if Penn never held another football game but its clear this topic is beyond the emotional boundry to talk about the situation in a rational manner.


I totally missed your rant that the govt should get involved. The govt has no business in the matter you are speaking about.

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 02:14 PM
Did you attend SMU or have some ties to the school? What happend at SMU was something that was a direct violation of the rules that the NCAA had. What happend at Penn St really has nothing to do with the football program or certainly not the football program as it stands today. Sandusky is in jail, Joe is dead and I think the other two officials should have charges being filed if they havent already. What happend at Penn St is criminal and is being delt with as such, however the NCAA changing its rules and power to level punishment in this case is purely because of public outcry. I have no dog in the fight and couldnt care less if Penn never held another football game but its clear this topic is beyond the emotional boundry to talk about the situation in a rational manner.


I totally missed your rant that the govt should get involved. The govt has no business in the matter you are speaking about.

What? Programs get hit all the time for stupid stuff regarding this:


PRINCIPLES OF INSTITUTIONAL CONTROL
AS PREPARED BY THE NCAA COMMITTEE ON INFRACTIONS

A. "CONTROL" IS DEFINED IN COMMON-SENSE TERMS.

In determining whether there has been a lack of institutional control when a violation of NCAA
rules has been found it is necessary to ascertain what formal institutional policies and procedures
were in place at the time the violation of NCAA rules occurred and whether those policies and
procedures, if adequate, were being monitored and enforced. It is important that policies and
procedures be established so as to deter violations and not merely to discover their existence
after they have taken place. In a case where proper procedures exist and are appropriately
enforced, especially when they result in the prompt detection, investigation and reporting of the
violations in question, there may be no lack of institutional control although the individual or
individuals directly involved may be held responsible.

In a situation in which adequate institutional procedures exist, at least on paper, a practical,
common-sense approach is appropriate in determining whether they are adequately monitored
and enforced by a person in "control." Obviously, general institutional control is exercised by the
chief executive officer of a member institution. However, it is rare that the chief executive officer
will make decisions specifically affecting the operations of the institution's athletics program.
Instead, the day-to-day duties of operation, including compliance with NCAA rules, will have been
delegated to subordinates either by specific action or by the creation of appropriate job
descriptions. Moreover, it is usually left to senior subordinates, such as the director of athletics,
further to delegate various duties regarding compliance with NCAA rules.

...

http://compliance.pac-12.org/thetools/instctl.pdf

And yes, reporting known criminal matters to the police is a policy within all universities.

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 02:33 PM
What? Programs get hit all the time for stupid stuff regarding this:




http://compliance.pac-12.org/thetools/instctl.pdf

And yes, reporting known criminal matters to the police is a policy within all universities.



Lack of instl control is widely worded but the first link is an article I read that talked about the move Mark made that were certainly not what the NCAA does. The NCAA's actions here are not precedented. I will post two paragraphs those for those whom have a hard time with the SMU/Penn comparison



http://sports.yahoo.com/news/ncaaf--mark-emmert-ncaa-penn-state-sanctions-joe-paterno-graham-spanier-.html


The decision came almost solely from Emmert, sources say. He used the significance of the scandal to allow the NCAA Board of Directors to provide him with powers not seen since the iron-fisted Walter Byers ran the organization from 1951-1988.

"Unprecedented," said one NCAA source. "This is just unprecedented."

[Related: Charles Robinson: Staggering penalties likely for Penn State]

Rather than allowing the tedious infractions process to churn on for years, there was no NCAA investigation, no hearings, no letter of inquiry, no reports, no chance for formal response, no nothing. Rather than wait for criminal cases and every last bit of evidence to trickle in, this was Emmert reading the school's own Freeh Commission report and deciding enough was enough







Current NCAA rules limit the penalty to colleges already on probation that commit another major violation. But NCAA leaders have indicated in recent months they are willing to use harsher penalties for the worst offenses. That includes postseason and TV bans, which haven't been used extensively since the 1980s.




""This is completely different than an impermissible benefits scandal like (what) happened at SMU, or anything else we've dealt with. This is as systemic a cultural problem as it is a football problem. There have been people that said this wasn't a football scandal," Emmert told PBS. "Well, it was more than a football scandal, much more than a football scandal. It was that but much more. And we'll have to figure out exactly what the right penalties are. I don't know that past precedent makes particularly good sense in this case, because it's really an unprecedented problem."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/22/ncaa-penn-state-punishment-sandusky-abuse_n_1692814.html

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 02:56 PM
^ yeah, I don't know where you are going with all that. Anyways, the NCAA decree on the Ped State ruling can be found here: http://a.espncdn.com/pdf/2012/0723/pennstateconclusions.pdf

...

1. A failure to value and uphold institutional integrity demonstrated by inadequate,
and in some instances non-existent, controls and oversight surrounding the
athletics program of the University, such as those controls prescribed by Articles
2.1, 6.01.1, and 6.4 of the NCAA Constitution.

2. A failure to maintain minimal standards of appropriate and responsible conduct.
The NCAA seeks to foster an environment and culture of honesty, as exemplified
by NCAA Bylaws 10.01.1 and 11.1.1, and by Bylaw 10.1 on ethical conduct.
Indeed, NCAA Bylaw I 0.1 enumerates a non-exhaustive list of examples of
inappropriate conduct. In addition, Article 2.4 of the NCAA Constitution requires
athletic programs to adhere to fundamental values of respect, faimess, civility,
honesty and responsibility.

3. A lack of adherence to fundamental notions of individual integrity. An
institution's head coach should promote an atmosphere for compliance and
monitor the activities of all assistant coaches and other administrators involved
with the program who report directly or indirectly to the coach. Further, NCAA
Bylaw 19.01.2, consistent with Article 2.4 of the NCAA Constitution, demands
the employees associated with intercollegiate athletics to serve as positive moral
models for students in order "for intercollegiate athletics to promote the character
development of participants, to enhance the integrity of higher education and to
promote civility in society."

...

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 03:05 PM
^ yeah, I don't know where you are going with all that. Anyways, the NCAA decree on the Ped State ruling can be found here: http://a.espncdn.com/pdf/2012/0723/pennstateconclusions.pdf



Show me what the results of the NCAA investigation were not the decree

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 03:21 PM
Show me what the results of the NCAA investigation were not the decree

What are you talking about? They didn't do their own investigation, they used the Freeh investigation as their source of information for determining the punishment. Freeh was hired by Penn State to do the investigation and obviously wasn't doing the university any favors given his results, so I don't see an issue with it. That document I linked has signatures from the president of the NCAA and the president of PSU. They accepted that punishment as a semi-plea deal, because it could have been much worse.

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 03:27 PM
What are you talking about? They didn't do their own investigation, they used the Freeh investigation as their source of information for determining the punishment. Freeh was hired by Penn State to do the investigation and obviously wasn't doing the university any favors given his results, so I don't see an issue with it. That document I linked has signatures from the president of the NCAA and the president of PSU. They accepted that punishment as a semi-plea deal, because it could have been much worse.



What am I talking about? Thats exactly my point they didnt do any investigation. Tell me the last time the NCAA handed down punishment in any larger fashion without doing an investigation, without doing much work at all and having a single person decide what was going to happen? You cant because this isnt something that happend even with the SMU issues. PSU accepted the deal because any fight would be prolonged and continue the issue and thats what would have been worse not the punishment.

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 03:40 PM
What am I talking about? Thats exactly my point they didnt do any investigation. Tell me the last time the NCAA handed down punishment in any larger fashion without doing an investigation, without doing much work at all and having a single person decide what was going to happen? You cant because this isnt something that happend even with the SMU issues. PSU accepted the deal because any fight would be prolonged and continue the issue and thats what would have been worse not the punishment.

Is it really necessary to spend the money and resources to conduct the same investigation that is already being done by an independent firm, the FBI and other government organizations? I really don't think so in this case. It's pretty well known, and they did wait for the court to rule on the charges against Sandusky himself before instituting these penalties.

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 03:46 PM
Is it really necessary to spend the money and resources to conduct the same investigation that is already being done by an independent firm, the FBI and other government organizations? I really don't think so in this case. It's pretty well known, and they did wait for the court to rule on the charges against Sandusky himself before instituting these penalties.


Like I said the NCAA acted in a manner that it had not before. No investigation(which for them typically takes forever) and a single person deciding how the punishment should go. You said programs get hit for stupid stuff like this all the time but no they dont. There usually is a process for the NCAA and its punishment.

Goldensilence
07-23-2012, 04:03 PM
Like I said the NCAA acted in a manner that it had not before. No investigation(which for them typically takes forever) and a single person deciding how the punishment should go. You said programs get hit for stupid stuff like this all the time but no they dont. There usually is a process for the NCAA and its punishment.

I think Dutch's and the NCCA's point is.....why commit more resources, man power, and time into another report when the Freeh is already independent of both Penn State and the NCAA? Do you think an NCAA investigation would've come up with anything substantially different?

In the case of Penn State...I think they got off better using the Freeh Report and the subsequent punishment handed out better than another full blown investigation by the NCAA. Which might have come up with even worse results now that the lid was blown off and people might be more willing to come forward with any additional knowledge. It might have also given even more time for an even larger growing public backlash. I think "plea bargain" with the Freeh Report is accurate.

I am curious as to what the Big 10 conference itself decides to do.

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 04:24 PM
I think Dutch's and the NCCA's point is.....why commit more resources, man power, and time into another report when the Freeh is already independent of both Penn State and the NCAA? Do you think an NCAA investigation would've come up with anything substantially different?


I personally think it would be the same outcome however that doesnt change my opinion of the process or how it went.



In the case of Penn State...I think they got off better using the Freeh Report and the subsequent punishment handed out better than another full blown investigation by the NCAA. Which might have come up with even worse results now that the lid was blown off and people might be more willing to come forward with any additional knowledge. It might have also given even more time for an even larger growing public backlash. I think "plea bargain" with the Freeh Report is accurate.

I am curious as to what the Big 10 conference itself decides to do.



Im not sure I am confident in NCAA's ability to do anything with consistency so Im dont know how their investigation would go or what the outcome would be from a prolonged timeframe. I do know that PSU is probably better off accepting anything that came their way asap to start the road to putting this somewhat behind them.

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 04:29 PM
Like I said the NCAA acted in a manner that it had not before. No investigation(which for them typically takes forever) and a single person deciding how the punishment should go.

Ok, so do you want to argue that the football program of Penn State had nothing to do with the coverup of Jerry Sandusky's child molestation over the past 14 years? If not, then move on to something else, because you're wasting everyone's time in this thread.

You said programs get hit for stupid stuff like this all the time but no they dont. There usually is a process for the NCAA and its punishment.

Lack of institutional control is a common sanction from the NCAA, Ohio State was the most recent one to be hit with it. Usually it's with regard to recruiting players or improper benefits being given to players. USC was hit with it for the Reggie Bush stuff. It really is quite common if you pay attention to NCAA football news. It's usually for stupid little things that add up, this instance with Penn State is much more severe and warrants the harsh punishment.

2012Champs
07-23-2012, 04:36 PM
Ok, so do you want to argue that the football program of Penn State had nothing to do with the coverup of Jerry Sandusky's child molestation over the past 14 years? If not, then move on to something else, because you're wasting everyone's time in this thread.



Lack of institutional control is a common sanction from the NCAA, Ohio State was the most recent one to be hit with it. Usually it's with regard to recruiting players or improper benefits being given to players. USC was hit with it for the Reggie Bush stuff. It really is quite common if you pay attention to NCAA football news. It's usually for stupid little things that add up, this instance with Penn State is much more severe and warrants the harsh punishment.


My stance certainly isnt that the football program didnt have anything to do with it. Two of the coaches had something to do with the cover up. What they were covering up wasnt football related. Also of note no one in the program now was responsible for this mess, all four involved are now gone.


Again getting hit with punishment isnt the point its how they came to that resolution. I pay attention to football news and thats how I can tell you the NCAA doesnt hand out punishment without investigating and deciding as an organization how it will proceed.

Playoffs
07-23-2012, 04:54 PM
Death penelty. Only acceptable punishment.
I agree.

This wasn't about buying student/athletes cars or shaving points, this was an intentional conspiracy to protect the money inflow ... whose direct and expected result was the continued sexual assault of more little boys.

Football monies > child molestation. No program has done worse.

NCAA should have killed the program and spread temporary scholarships around to cover the student-athletes caught in the middle of this.

Dutchrudder
07-23-2012, 05:06 PM
My stance certainly isnt that the football program didnt have anything to do with it. Two of the coaches had something to do with the cover up. What they were covering up wasnt football related. Also of note no one in the program now was responsible for this mess, all four involved are now gone.

Umm, yeah it was football related. They were covering up a former coach's transgressions and enabled him to continue to rape children. Personally, I hope the sanctions go well beyond just the stupid football program. But to argue that it has nothing to do with the football program, protecting JoePa's legacy, allowing him to keep pushing for the most wins in NCAA history, and whatnot is just foolish. The football program was the heart of it. The football program made Sandusky a local celebrity and enabled him to create a charity that essentially became a child escort service for this guy. They were enablers, and they deserve to have it all burnt to the ground.

That university has built a cult-like following where their people actually think that the school and its students are the real victims in this case. I would be just fine with it losing accreditation and allowing everyone to transfer away from that cesspool of morals. Get them into some normal schools and maybe that will break the spell of insanity.

Again getting hit with punishment isnt the point its how they came to that resolution. I pay attention to football news and thats how I can tell you the NCAA doesnt hand out punishment without investigating and deciding as an organization how it will proceed.

Well yeah, because in every other case there hasn't been a criminal investigation from the FBI and other enforcement agencies. In those cases, there weren't independent investigations being commissioned by the school, because NONE of them were anywhere near as bad as this! How is it that hard to understand? Nothing in the history of the NCAA has been this bad. Period. So when they rule in a way that is unprecedented in response to acts that are also unprecedented, don't be so surprised.

Vinny
07-24-2012, 11:07 AM
My stance certainly isnt that the football program didnt have anything to do with it. Two of the coaches had something to do with the cover up. What they were covering up wasnt football related.
it was more of an individual concern...until they decided to protect the football program instead of the kids. Then it became a coverup for the football program. There was no other reason to not call in the authorities and give up control of your secret knowledge...about things going on inside the Penn St. Football shower room. Covering up the information makes it your problem.

anyway, I came here to post this link to the Sean Pendergast opinion piece from the Houston Press. Its in response to the Paterno family spewage.

Since it appears that the Paterno family is only capable of speaking in the age old language of Released Statement-ese, allow me to release my statement to them:

Shut the **** up. Seriously, shut the **** up.
Unless you have something of substance to add to the allegations against Jerry Sandusky or have a fat six figure check you wish to donate to a charity helping the victims of child sexual abuse heal, nobody gives a rat's ass what you think about the removal of your father's statue, the removal of scholarships from Penn State's program, or the removal of dog **** from your front yard.
http://blogs.houstonpress.com/hairballs/2012/07/penn_state_scandal_my_statemen.php?ref=trending
http://blogs.houstonpress.com/hairballs/2012/07/penn_state_scandal_my_statemen.php?ref=trending

2012Champs
07-24-2012, 11:55 AM
it was more of an individual concern...until they decided to protect the football program instead of the kids. Then it became a coverup for the football program. There was no other reason to not call in the authorities and give up control of your secret knowledge...about things going on inside the Penn St. Football shower room. Covering up the information makes it your problem.

anyway, I came here to post this link to the Sean Pendergast opinion piece from the Houston Press. Its in response to the Paterno family spewage.


http://blogs.houstonpress.com/hairballs/2012/07/penn_state_scandal_my_statemen.php?ref=trending
http://blogs.houstonpress.com/hairballs/2012/07/penn_state_scandal_my_statemen.php?ref=trending


Well Joe's family certainly arent helping his cause or case or theirs, however you want to put it.

Vinny
07-24-2012, 12:13 PM
Well Joe's family certainly arent helping his cause or case or theirs, however you want to put it.
They are behaving in a similar way that Joe behaved. They seem to think that the end justifies the means or that you can somehow excuse Joe's behavior with his good deeds. Dude did a lot of good things, but as I tell my 16yo kid...you can ruin a good reputation far faster than building a good one. It just takes a little bit of poor judgement.

2012Champs
07-24-2012, 12:40 PM
They are behaving in a similar way that Joe behaved. They seem to think that the end justifies the means or that you can somehow excuse Joe's behavior with his good deeds. Dude did a lot of good things, but as I tell my 16yo kid...you can ruin a good reputation far faster than building a good one. It just takes a little bit of poor judgement.



very true its crazy to see the amount of support Joe has from alum and those around the school

Blake
07-25-2012, 03:18 PM
I still think these Penn State sanctions are weak ass ****. I hear Herbstreit talking about Penn State is going to be a weak football team for years to come even after the 4 years. But when I look at USC, I see them still winning a PAC10 title, and next year looking to contend for a NC and a heisman QB.

Yeah, those sanctions are really hurting USC. /sarcasm

2012Champs
07-25-2012, 06:04 PM
I still think these Penn State sanctions are weak ass ****. I hear Herbstreit talking about Penn State is going to be a weak football team for years to come even after the 4 years. But when I look at USC, I see them still winning a PAC10 title, and next year looking to contend for a NC and a heisman QB.

Yeah, those sanctions are really hurting USC. /sarcasm



What were the terms of USCs punishment ?

GlassHalfFull
07-25-2012, 07:27 PM
I still think these Penn State sanctions are weak ass ****. I hear Herbstreit talking about Penn State is going to be a weak football team for years to come even after the 4 years. But when I look at USC, I see them still winning a PAC10 title, and next year looking to contend for a NC and a heisman QB.

Yeah, those sanctions are really hurting USC. /sarcasm

USC had a 2 year bowl ban, Penn State has a 4 year bowl ban. In my mind, that is way more powerful. They won't be able to effectively recruit for at least 2 years with a 4 year post season ban. With a 2 year ban, you still are able to recruit, most players expect to be redshirted anyway their first year. With a 4 year ban, you have nothing to offer. Not to mention most current players who can, will more than likely jump ship. 2 other factors will come into play, the scholarship hit was bigger and the shame factor cannot be discounted.

I think this penalty will have much harder sting than USC had. Dead team walking.

Texan_Bill
07-25-2012, 09:38 PM
I still think these Penn State sanctions are weak ass ****. I hear Herbstreit talking about Penn State is going to be a weak football team for years to come even after the 4 years. But when I look at USC, I see them still winning a PAC10 title, and next year looking to contend for a NC and a heisman QB.

Yeah, those sanctions are really hurting USC. /sarcasm

Really? (Not being a smartass here) but how can you compare the two situations? Recruits (albeit less scholarships) would go to SC becuase the infractions that SC ware penalized for are far less then the stigma of a program that one that covered up pedophilia (By the one of the most powerful people in the state of Pennsylvania) in a conference where a lot of teams are on equal playing ground

Conversely, SC will continue to draw great recuits with or without bowl sanctions because they are the "cream and crop" of the PAC 37. *EDIT* Also SC plays in a conference where sometimes OSU, Stanford or anyone else once in a while stands up and makes a play... The Big 10??? Way more comp...

In a novel called, 'Oklahoma Vs Texas: When Football Becomes War' by Robert Heard there are way more egregious NCAA infractions than USC or even many years later SMU..

At PSU, I think their penalty is far harsher (as it should be) than SMU's "Death Penalty". Why?? Again, that program will have such a long lasting negative stigma that they will lose a lot, let me say this again, A LOT of PA kids that wanted to play there.

I also think it's a harsher penalty in the sense that while they continue to play football (and remain in the minds of college football fans) that their legacy will falter and their indiscrentions will be recognized..

SMU on the other hand has their program under control and even built a beautiful Gerald Ford Stadium... (no dumbasses, not that Gerald Ford)

steelbtexan
07-25-2012, 10:41 PM
Really? (Not being a smartass here) but how can you compare the two situations? Recruits (albeit less scholarships) would go to SC becuase the infractions that SC ware penalized for are far less then the stigma of a program that one that covered up pedophilia (By the one of the most powerful people in the state of Pennsylvania) in a conference where a lot of teams are on equal playing ground

Conversely, SC will continue to draw great recuits with or without bowl sanctions because they are the "cream and crop" of the PAC 37. *EDIT* Also SC plays in a conference where sometimes OSU, Stanford or anyone else once in a while stands up and makes a play... The Big 10??? Way more comp...

In a novel called, 'Oklahoma Vs Texas: When Football Becomes War' by Robert Heard there are way more egregious NCAA infractions than USC or even many years later SMU..

At PSU, I think their penalty is far harsher (as it should be) than SMU's "Death Penalty". Why?? Again, that program will have such a long lasting negative stigma that they will lose a lot, let me say this again, A LOT of PA kids that wanted to play there.

I also think it's a harsher penalty in the sense that while they continue to play football (and remain in the minds of college football fans) that their legacy will falter and their indiscrentions will be recognized..

SMU on the other hand has their program under control and even built a beautiful Gerald Ford Stadium... (no dumbasses, not that Gerald Ford)

Really,

Little boys getting a** raped and Penn St isn't even kicked off TV for a yr.

Meanwhile all SMU did was pay a few players and their program was shut down and all of their players transfered immediately. They had to rebuild their program from scrath.

Penn St players can but probably wont transfer. So they wont have to start from scratch. I will bet you that in 5-7 yrs Penn St will be a top tier big 11 team. Meanwhile SMU still hasn't recovered 25 yrs later.

Dutchrudder
07-25-2012, 11:36 PM
Really,

Little boys getting a** raped and Penn St isn't even kicked off TV for a yr.

Meanwhile all SMU did was pay a few players and their program was shut down and all of their players transfered immediately. They had to rebuild their program from scrath.

Penn St players can but probably wont transfer. So they wont have to start from scratch. I will bet you that in 5-7 yrs Penn St will be a top tier big 11 team. Meanwhile SMU still hasn't recovered 25 yrs later.

I want them on TV, I get the Big 10 network and I will enjoy seeing them lose 77-12 each week. It will be quite amusing, as will the announcers who may have to be careful of what they say about the school and its sanctions.

Blake
07-26-2012, 08:27 AM
In reply to all... yes, Penn State will be bad, ...for 2 years. In 2 years once PSU recruits realize as USC recruits did that they can sign on with PSU, redshirt a year and position themselves to be starters when the bowl ban is over they will go right back to Linebacker U and all the amenities and perks that a school like PSU are powerful enough to offer these kids.

PSU president just said that they were faced with either their current sanctions, or a 4 year death penalty. I think they deserved the latter.

2012Champs
07-26-2012, 11:08 AM
Really,

Little boys getting a** raped and Penn St isn't even kicked off TV for a yr.

Meanwhile all SMU did was pay a few players and their program was shut down and all of their players transfered immediately. They had to rebuild their program from scrath.

Penn St players can but probably wont transfer. So they wont have to start from scratch. I will bet you that in 5-7 yrs Penn St will be a top tier big 11 team. Meanwhile SMU still hasn't recovered 25 yrs later.




Im not sure I would say all SMU did was pay a few players. That certainly doesnt acknowledge what was going on at SMU for a long time.

2012Champs
07-26-2012, 11:09 AM
In reply to all... yes, Penn State will be bad, ...for 2 years. In 2 years once PSU recruits realize as USC recruits did that they can sign on with PSU, redshirt a year and position themselves to be starters when the bowl ban is over they will go right back to Linebacker U and all the amenities and perks that a school like PSU are powerful enough to offer these kids.

PSU president just said that they were faced with either their current sanctions, or a 4 year death penalty. I think they deserved the latter.



Its not like Penn had a choice in which punishment it would get. I believe they were told this is what is going to happen and if you dont like it we can hit you with a 4 year death penalty.

Goldensilence
08-18-2012, 06:58 PM
http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/8278897/penn-state-nittany-lions-scandal-defensive-joe-paterno-quoted-biography-saying-not-omniscient


I have lost what little respect I still had for Paterno.

AnthonyE
08-18-2012, 10:30 PM
I've defended JoePa throughout this entire time, but after reading that article even I raised my eyebrow. A very sad situation, indeed.

Hervoyel
08-19-2012, 03:20 PM
I'm convinced that he knew far more than anyone close to him or who supported him will ever admit. I think we're going to find that most if not all of the various "paths" that could be investigated around Joe Paterno have been quietly walled off by people trying to salvage his reputation and who are devoted to the schools cult. Unless those people missed something or made a mistake we're never going to find a genuine smoking gun that proves exactly how much he knew.

Instead we're going to have to use our own individual bull**** meters to parse the version of the story we get. That's fine by me. I'm convinced now that he was either profoundly retarded and incapable of feeding and dressing himself OR he's a ****ing liar. I'm sure it's one of the two.

ArlingtonTexan
08-20-2012, 06:32 PM
I really should just stay away from this case, but latest insult to my intelligence is that Paterno did not know what "sodomy" was. Taking it to the illogical extreme, if he was that sheltered from the world, then yes I could buy that Joe Pa could be totaly unaware of something this horrible going on under his nose.

I don't believe that though. I mean see him not knowing what a "hot carl" or "tossing the salad" or a "london bridge" is. Sodomy is garden variety religious and legal term that has been used forever.

steelbtexan
08-20-2012, 07:15 PM
Im not sure I would say all SMU did was pay a few players. That certainly doesnt acknowledge what was going on at SMU for a long time.

Enlighten me,

What was going on at SMU?

MojoMan
08-20-2012, 07:35 PM
I really should just stay away from this case, but latest insult to my intelligence is that Paterno did not know what "sodomy" was. Taking it to the illogical extreme, if he was that sheltered from the world, then yes I could buy that Joe Pa could be totaly unaware of something this horrible going on under his nose.

I don't believe that though. I mean see him not knowing what a "hot carl" or "tossing the salad" or a "london bridge" is. Sodomy is garden variety religious and legal term that has been used forever.

I agree with you on Joe Paterno and the meaning of the word sodomy.

But, I have to admit, I do not know what any of the three terms in the bolded sentence refer to. That being said, if they are terms that refer to some sort of perverted sex acts, please feel free to not explain it to me.

ArlingtonTexan
08-20-2012, 10:55 PM
I agree with you on Joe Paterno and the meaning of the word sodomy.

But, I have to admit, I do not know what any of the three terms in the bolded sentence refer to. That being said, if they are terms that refer to some sort of perverted sex acts, please feel free to not explain it to me.

They are and I won't.

Goldensilence
10-03-2012, 11:09 AM
http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/8454527/mike-mcqueary-files-defamation-suit-penn-state


Just go **** yourself Mike. No seriously, in no nice way, go **** yourself.

Playoffs
10-03-2012, 11:18 AM
"Spanier's statements have irreparably harmed (McQueary's) reputation for honesty and integrity, and have irreparably harmed (his) ability to earn a living, especially in his chosen profession of coaching football," the lawsuit said.
McQueary abandoned "honesty & integrity" by keeping it in house and keeping his job.

Nothing to damage, no case.

Double Barrel
10-03-2012, 12:20 PM
I agree. To hell with Mike McQueary. He threw away his integrity when he decided that the reputation of a football program was more important than justice. Screw him and screw that entire school. They are all acting like victims when it's their school's culture that helped to cover this up and perpetuate it for far too long.

GlassHalfFull
10-09-2012, 11:19 AM
Jerry Sandusky sentenced to at least 30 yearshttp://www.boston.com/news/2012/10/09/jerry-sandusky-sentenced-least-years/1AS7UcCiRMzTE7SpEMTmEP/story.html

BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) — Jerry Sandusky was sentenced Tuesday to at least 30 years in prison — effectively a life sentence — in the child sexual abuse scandal that brought shame to Penn State and led to coach Joe Paterno’s downfall.

A defiant Sandusky gave a rambling statement in which he denied the allegations and talked about his life in prison and the pain of being away from his family.

Three victims spoke, often fighting back tears. One looked Sandusky in the eyes at times during his statement.

Double Barrel
10-09-2012, 12:54 PM
A defiant Sandusky

That phrase just pisses me off. For this p.o.s. to be defiant just tells me that he's not sorry for what he did. I'd elaborate on what I hope happens to him, but that's probably bad form. I'm sure y'all can fill in the blanks.

Dread-Head
10-09-2012, 01:04 PM
This piece of filth had the stones to blame his VICTIMS and accused the first one who spoke up of being a "serial victim". What a tool. He deserves EVERYTHING that happens to him in prison.

Playoffs
10-09-2012, 06:49 PM
...He deserves EVERYTHING that happens to him in prison.


I kind of wonder if prison doesn't become an eagerly anticipated playground for people with Sandusky's preferences??? I dunno.

ArlingtonTexan
10-09-2012, 07:19 PM
I kind of wonder if prison doesn't become an eagerly anticipated playground for people with Sandusky's preferences??? I dunno.

He has preference for largely defenseless underage boys, not grown-ass harden criminals.

gtexan02
10-09-2012, 11:26 PM
He'll die in prison. Theres some justice in that at least

powda
10-09-2012, 11:57 PM
He'll die in prison. Theres some justice in that at least

Justice would be a dozen broom sticks up his arse and a lit gasoline enema. Im amazed all he got was the 30-60 years.

Texan_Bill
10-10-2012, 09:47 AM
30 to 60 years huh? What's that, about 8 months to a year and 4 months per case that he was found guilty of???

While the fact that this evil person will effectively spend the rest of his life behind bars, the judge really, REALLY dropped the ball in sentencing. This sentence sends a horrible message IMO.

MojoMan
10-10-2012, 09:53 AM
Sandusky is 68 years old and will serve a minimum of 30 years. He could potentially be eligible for release when he is 98.

And of course if they ever put him into the general population, his projected longevity will fall rapidly. From what I understand, convicted felons do not like serving time with child molesters. That especially applies to those convicts that were molested as children themselves.

Texan_Bill
10-10-2012, 10:05 AM
Sandusky is 68 years old and will serve a minimum of 30 years. He could potentially be eligible for release when he is 98.

And of course if they ever put him into the general population, his projected longevity will fall rapidly. From what I understand, convicted felons do not like serving time with child molesters. That especially applies to those convicts that were molested as children themselves.

More than likely he'll be shipped off to a minimum security unit where non-violent offenders serve time. I don't see the "crooked accountant" shanking his ass.

MojoMan
10-10-2012, 10:08 AM
More than likely he'll be shipped off to a minimum security unit where non-violent offenders serve time. I don't see the "crooked accountant" shanking his ass.

Well that would be a tremendous injustice if that were to occur. How is child molestation "non-violent?"

2012Champs
10-10-2012, 10:15 AM
More than likely he'll be shipped off to a minimum security unit where non-violent offenders serve time. I don't see the "crooked accountant" shanking his ass.



They said on the news last night that he would still be allowed to watch penn st football games. I think thats kind of fed

Dread-Head
10-10-2012, 12:36 PM
I kind of wonder if prison doesn't become an eagerly anticipated playground for people with Sandusky's preferences??? I dunno.

No. He's used to be a QB. In prison he'll be a receiver. Child molesters are walking dead men in prison.

eriadoc
10-10-2012, 01:05 PM
30 to 60 years huh? What's that, about 8 months to a year and 4 months per case that he was found guilty of???

While the fact that this evil person will effectively spend the rest of his life behind bars, the judge really, REALLY dropped the ball in sentencing. This sentence sends a horrible message IMO.

I agree. The part that really baffles me about this sort of thing is if you're going to send him away for what will effectively be a life sentence, then why not send the appropriate message as well? The guy is going to die in prison, so you may as well have sentenced him to a million years or something, just for the message it sends.

Of course, I'd have been OK with the death penalty as well.

toronto
10-10-2012, 05:06 PM
In a perfect world, he'd be locked in a room with the families and victims for about a week. No escape, no rules.

By the time it was over he'd look like someone who had been in a fishbowl with piranhas.

In this case, I'd be rooting hard for the fish.

Texan_Bill
10-10-2012, 08:18 PM
In a perfect world, he'd be locked in a room with the families and victims for about a week. No escape, no rules.

By the time it was over he'd look like someone who had been in a fishbowl with piranhas.

In this case, I'd be rooting hard for the fish.

Locked in a room with family members would be too emotional. Family members would be too quick and it would be too easy on him. He needs to be locked in a room with average "Joes" who would take pleasure in drawing out the finale!

Corrosion
10-10-2012, 09:19 PM
Locked in a room with family members would be too emotional. Family members would be too quick and it would be too easy on him. He needs to be locked in a room with average "Joes" who would take pleasure in drawing out the finale!

Oh if he was only locked in a room with you and I .... if we can whoop six melonheads without you breaking a sweat .... imagine what we could do to an old pedophile.


Dread you want in brotha ?!

Honoring Earl 34
10-10-2012, 09:46 PM
A maximum security prison is the very basic example of human existence . If these criminals judge a child molester as the lowest of the low , then who am I to interfere .

powda
10-10-2012, 10:05 PM
Oh if he was only locked in a room with you and I .... if we can whoop six melonheads without you breaking a sweat .... imagine what we could do to an old pedophile.


Dread you want in brotha ?!

If I said I wanted in on this action would it be twisted into police brutality by someone or would I get a free pass considering the pos sandusky is?:runaway:

Corrosion
10-10-2012, 11:03 PM
If I said I wanted in on this action would it be twisted into police brutality by someone or would I get a free pass considering the pos sandusky is?:runaway:

Brother you would get a free pass from me ..... But it might be overkill. Hang'em High (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJM2paIyn2c):choke:


(I always try to be fair with you , Im not one for a double standard)

powda
10-10-2012, 11:18 PM
Brother you would get a free pass from me ..... But it might be overkill. Hang'em High (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJM2paIyn2c):choke:


(I always try to be fair with you , Im not one for a double standard)

Outstanding!

(Begins gathering taser, asp baton, oc spray, steel toe boots, torch, gasoline, pliers...)

Playoffs
12-01-2013, 12:52 PM
New court filing details former Penn State President Graham Spanier's alleged lies to Sandusky grand jury (http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2013/11/new_court_filing_details_forme.html)
The state attorney general’s office filed Friday what amounts to four pages detailing alleged lies told by former Penn State President Graham Spanier in his grand jury testimony from the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse probe.
Among the key points from Spanier’s claims at Strawberry Square that day:


When asked if there was any discussion about reporting the 2001 shower incident witnessed by former Penn State assistant football coach Mike McQueary to police, Spanier said “No.”

Emails discovered later in the probe contain a three-way discussion between Spanier, his then-senior vice president for finance and business Gary Schultz and Athletic Director Tim Curley seemingly going over the pros and cons of just such a move.

They ultimately decided against filing a report at that time.


Spanier said he was never been informed of an earlier, 1998 university police investigation of another shower room incident with Sandusky, then the longtime defensive coordinator to legendary head football coach Joe Paterno.

In that case, emails show that Schultz and Curley, Spanier’s co-defendants in what some have called a “conspiracy of silence,” had been keeping close tabs on the 1998 probe.

Spanier was copied on at least one of those emails – a recap from Schultz, who had been in regular communication with the Penn State police chief, noting that no charges would be filed and that the matter appeared to be closed.


In a matter sure to be hotly disputed at trial, Spanier testified he never knew the allegations against Sandusky were of a sexual nature. Spanier told the jurors he was told a staff member (McQueary) had witnessed “horsing around” in the showers that made that staff member uncomfortable.

McQueary has repeatedly testified that he told Paterno, and later Curley and Schultz, that he believed he was witnessing a sexual assault.

Spanier told grand jurors that message was never conveyed to him, and “I know better than to jump to conclusions about things like that.”

Prosecutors will likely hold that assertion up against the February 2001 e-mails in which the three former Penn State administrators discuss Sandusky’s “problem” and how best to handle it.

Spanier, at one point, signs off on Curley’s suggestion to not report to police or child welfare agencies and instead require that he seek professional help, calling it would be the “humane” way to proceed...

Playoffs
03-05-2014, 01:46 PM
The Whistleblower's Last Stand (http://espn.go.com/espn/feature/story/_/id/10542793/the-whistleblower-last-stand)

In Mike McQueary, some see a hero who brought down a monster. Others see a liar who railroaded a legend. At the upcoming trial that will close the book on the Jerry Sandusky scandal, Joe Paterno's former protégé will have the final word.
THE STAR WITNESS was anonymous, like each of Jerry Sandusky's victims.

He was described in the grand jury presentment only as "a Penn State graduate assistant." Anyone reading the 23-page presentment released on Nov. 4, 2011, would be horrified by the prosecution's version of what the witness said he saw a decade ago. In the locker room shower inside the Lasch Football Building on Penn State's campus, he stumbled upon...

Mike McQueary Allegedly Gambled While at Penn State, Told His Players He Was Abused as a Child According to ESPN (http://thebiglead.com/2014/03/04/mike-mcqueary-allegedly-gambled-while-at-penn-state-told-his-players-he-was-abused-as-a-child/)


Ending to 1995 Penn State football game looks supsicious after McQueary gambling report (http://www.bettingtalk.com/controversial-ending-penn-state-football-game-revisited-mcqueary-gambling-report/)
In 1995, Penn State... was a 20-point favorite over Rutgers in the game played at the Meadowlands...

McQueary, Penn State’s backup quarterback at the time, replaced starter Wally Richardson with just over a minute to play and the Nittany Lions leading 52-34.

Facing 2nd-and-7 at the Rutgers’ 42-yard line, most observers—including the TV announcers—were expecting McQueary to call a time-killing run up the middle. Instead, McQueary faked a handoff, dropped back and threw a deep pass to receiver Chris Campbell for a touchdown that put the Nittany Lions ahead by 25.

Replays show Paterno shaking his head after the score, and play-by-play man Ron Franklin described two Rutgers assistants looking at the Penn State bench with their arms out, “as if to say ‘why?’”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eV4No5wvHY

“I was looking for Pitts or someone else to run the clock down,” Franklin says after the play on the broadcast. “But they did not let that happen, and that’ll be discussed this coming week a little bit, maybe a lot.”

Graber was hot and confronted Paterno during the post-game handshake. Paterno responded with a hearty “bull****” and stormed off the field...

Nearly two decades later, what truly was behind McQueary’s decision is once again up for debate. An ESPN report on Monday put a spotlight on McQueary’s alleged gambling habit that included betting on Penn State games. From the report:

“One close college friend says he recalls that McQueary, as a junior and backup quarterback, bet on Penn State to cover an 8-point spread against Michigan State at Beaver Stadium in November 1996. The Nittany Lions won 32-29 on a late field goal, and McQueary, who was on the bench, lost his wager, the source said.

When McQueary’s gambling debts totaled thousands of dollars, his father paid them, several of McQueary’s former teammates said.

A close college friend said he urged McQueary to slow down the pace of his betting.

“It got pretty bad,” the friend said. “And it just kept snowballing and snowballing. He was very impulsive.”

A Penn State alumnus, who attended the university during McQueary’s playing days, told BettingTalk.com that there were rumors of the quarterback’s gambling at school, but said he never gave them much credence until seeing Monday’s report. That’s when he remembered the ending to the Penn State-Rutgers game...

Before This Week, the Most Un-Penn State Thing I Ever Saw Involved… Joe Paterno and Mike McQueary (http://the700level.com/ncaa/before-this-week-the-most-unpenn-state-thing-i-ever-saw-involved-joe-paterno-and-mike-mcqueary/)

This story keeps breeding more and more ugliness. http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i221/LavenderLola/Shower_by_dragonsnail.gif

TexansFTW
03-05-2014, 04:08 PM
I can live w/ gambling in games already over and decided.

Marshall
03-07-2014, 04:43 AM
The Whistleblower's Last Stand (http://espn.go.com/espn/feature/story/_/id/10542793/the-whistleblower-last-stand)




Mike McQueary Allegedly Gambled While at Penn State, Told His Players He Was Abused as a Child According to ESPN (http://thebiglead.com/2014/03/04/mike-mcqueary-allegedly-gambled-while-at-penn-state-told-his-players-he-was-abused-as-a-child/)


Ending to 1995 Penn State football game looks supsicious after McQueary gambling report (http://www.bettingtalk.com/controversial-ending-penn-state-football-game-revisited-mcqueary-gambling-report/)


Before This Week, the Most Un-Penn State Thing I Ever Saw Involved… Joe Paterno and Mike McQueary (http://the700level.com/ncaa/before-this-week-the-most-unpenn-state-thing-i-ever-saw-involved-joe-paterno-and-mike-mcqueary/)

This story keeps breeding more and more ugliness. http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i221/LavenderLola/Shower_by_dragonsnail.gif

Attacking the character of the whistleblower has always been a strategy of defense lawyers. Now I am surprised at how many defense lawyers there are who happen to be Penn State Alumni.