PDA

View Full Version : William Perry gets Super Bowl ring back


axman40
04-05-2011, 07:49 PM
When Tracy Forrest overheard her 10-year-old son Cliff on the phone trying to explain to someone that he wanted to give William Perry his Super Bowl XX ring back, she could tell Cliff was having a hard time being believed.
After all, what 10-year-old would give away something like a Super Bowl ring for nothing?
So Tracy got on the phone and lent an adult voice to her child's gesture of goodwill and generosity. That gesture culminated in Chicago on Saturday when Cliff handed the ring to the former Chicago Bears (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/chi/chicago-bears) defensive tackle, whose battle against Guillain-Barre syndrome has been well documented.
http://sports.espn.go.com/chicago/nfl/news/story?id=6290024
:tiphat:

HoustonFrog
04-05-2011, 07:57 PM
I read this yesterday and am more stunned at the circumstances than anything

a) what 10 year old has saved $6000 in a college fund..I'm assuming this was only part of it...so maybe more.

b) What parent lets a 10 year old decide that an old SB ring for $6000 is something that should be done vs keep saving for college.

c) What parent then lets the $6000 go to waste as he gives it back to the Fridge.

Great kid. Big heart. He'll probably have wonderful karma and have it come back to him but overall...strange.

jaayteetx
04-06-2011, 07:25 PM
and then gives it back.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/fb/texansfront/7510155.html
My question is, how in the H E double hockey sticks does he have access to his college fund? No way would my daughter have it to hers. Nice gesture, I guess.

Carr Bombed
04-06-2011, 07:59 PM
and then gives it back.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/fb/texansfront/7510155.html
My question is, how in the H E double hockey sticks does he have access to his college fund? No way would my daughter have it to hers. Nice gesture, I guess.


Look at the names... "Cliff Forrest Sr and Cliff Forrest Jr. of Fox Chapel, Pa".


:) Something tells me that this family has A LOT of money and $8,500 dollars is chump change to this kid and family.

HoustonFrog
04-06-2011, 08:31 PM
Look down :toast2:

http://www.texanstalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=80965

NitroGSXR
04-06-2011, 10:38 PM
I read this yesterday and am more stunned at the circumstances than anything

a) what 10 year old has saved $6000 in a college fund..I'm assuming this was only part of it...so maybe more.

b) What parent lets a 10 year old decide that an old SB ring for $6000 is something that should be done vs keep saving for college.

c) What parent then lets the $6000 go to waste as he gives it back to the Fridge.

Great kid. Big heart. He'll probably have wonderful karma and have it come back to him but overall...strange.

Let me try to answer your 3 questions as if they happened to my kids in this fictional scenario I have conjured up...

A) Me.
B) Me.
C) Me

So now I bet you'll be quick to jump me down into "bad parent" territory? What stuns me is how you are "stunned at the circumstances" when you don't even know any or the circumstances.

Absurd.

Look past the dollar signs for a second... this kid did a g-r-e-a-t thing and that is typically an indication of some solid parenting.

HoustonFrog
04-06-2011, 10:50 PM
Let me try to answer your 3 questions...

A) Me.
B) Me.
C) Me

So now I bet you'll be quick to jump me down into "bad parent" territory? What stuns me is how you are "stunned at the circumstances" when you don't even know any or the circumstances.

Absurd.

Look past the dollar signs for a second... this kid did a g-r-e-a-t thing and that is typically an indication of some solid parenting.

Dude, you need to back off a little and calm down. It isn't an indictment on the story if you read what I wrote at the end.

Great kid. Big heart. He'll probably have wonderful karma and have it come back to him but overall...strange.

I was the youngest of 5. I mowed some lawns and got a $20 allowance. I didn't know what $6000 looked like at 10. If I did and it was for college there was no way in hell my Dad would let me touch if I saw a ring because that is how he rolled....save your money, nothing frivolous. Then there would be no way in hell I'd get to give it back. I'd probably get a speech on "you made the decision to buy it, live with it." That isn't a bad thing. I think alot of parents would do the same thing.

So could you jump off the box now

NitroGSXR
04-07-2011, 08:31 AM
Dude, you need to back off a little and calm down. It isn't an indictment on the story if you read what I wrote at the end.



I was the youngest of 5. I mowed some lawns and got a $20 allowance. I didn't know what $6000 looked like at 10. If I did and it was for college there was no way in hell my Dad would let me touch if I saw a ring because that is how he rolled....save your money, nothing frivolous. Then there would be no way in hell I'd get to give it back. I'd probably get a speech on "you made the decision to buy it, live with it." That isn't a bad thing. I think alot of parents would do the same thing.

So could you jump off the box now

I'm perfectly calm, HoustonFrog. You missed the point of my post. I guess I view using a double negative qualifier between "good karma" as an indictment upon the parents. If I "misunderstood" then please accept my apologies.

:shrug:

FWIW, I understand. Your dad's perception on money sounds like my parents. That's why this story is special rather than "strange" to me. I ALWAYS wished my parents were more charitable. I guess being burned one time too many changes a person...

HoustonFrog
04-07-2011, 09:18 AM
I'm perfectly calm, HoustonFrog. You missed the point of my post. I guess I view using a double negative qualifier between "good karma" as an indictment upon the parents. If I "misunderstood" then please accept my apologies.

:shrug:

FWIW, I understand. Your dad's perception on money sounds like my parents. That's why this story is special rather than "strange" to me. I ALWAYS wished my parents were more charitable. I guess being burned one time too many changes a person...

Sorry if it came across that way. My points were meant as an exercise of stream of consciousness while reading the story. My bad if others saw it as an indictment too.

My parents were charitable and I never seemed to want for anything but my Dad was always pretty much hammering the value of work and the dollar. You know, "if your going to do a job, then do it all the way." That went for pulling weeds or a job. College for example. I had been accepted to TCU and Texas. I grew up loving Texas and had 2 brothers that went there. One reason my Dad preferred it was because it was a public school and I wouldn't get in over my head money wise. Luckily for me after my choice of TCU my Mom got a job there and I got free tuition. That was a criteria for him...not getting yourself in financial trouble. That is why he warned me about the expense of South Texas and law school in general. He was right. As you can tell I am stubborn and seemed to make choices that weren't theirs..lol. A little off the topic but that is the lione of thinking that entered my head while reading it.

GP
04-07-2011, 11:01 AM
Just reading the story, from my own perspective, this thing falls into a conflict of interest in terms of Personal Responsibility.

1. The Fridge sold his ring, reportedly needing the cash due to medical expenses.

At this point, IMO, he's forfeited his ownership of it and he very responsibly used an item (the ring) to help cover some expenses.

2. A parent allows a 10-year-old to withdraw thousands of dollars from the kid's college savings fund, in order to purchase a ring. The kid became a collector, IIRC, because his uncle passed away and he had inherited the collecting bug from the uncle. So it became a passion, of the kid, to collect stuff. I have no problem with anything up until this point.

3. Now I have a problem. The kid gets sentimental and decides to give the ring back to The Fridge. AND, The Fridge accepts it...instead of telling the kid, "Hey, you own that. I'm just glad to know who has it and that it's a kid who collects this stuff for the fun of it. No thanks, kid. But your gesture warms my heart. Maybe I can come drink some of your dad's beer?" jk.

4. IMO, who is to judge what the kid does with what he has? But from a personal preference, my dad wouldn't have allowed me to withdraw the cash for the ring in the first place AND my dad wouldn't have let me give it back to the man who sold it. As a dad, I would follow suit and do what I know my dad would have done in that spot as a parent of a kid wanting to spend money on such an item, etc.

A lot of commenters have said The Fridge will just pawn it again and spend it on booze or whatever. Well, maybe he won't. Where I'm disappointed is that The Fridge didn't refuse the ring...then again, it's generally rude to refuse the blessing of someone who WANTS to give you something.

It's just sort of an awkward and confusing story all the way around.

Is it any different than if the kid had bought an ATV for $5000, then donated the ATV to Make A Wish so kids could ride an ATV? I think it is. In my example, he took an item and donated it to less fortunate. In the real story discussed on this thread, the kid gave an item to the person who sold it in the first place.

It's just not as warm and fuzzy as I think it's intended to be. Regardless, the kid has a giving heart (which I think is what everyone on here has been saying, right?). Maybe THAT is the best part of the story then.

HoustonFrog
04-07-2011, 11:20 AM
Just reading the story, from my own perspective, this thing falls into a conflict of interest in terms of Personal Responsibility.

1. The Fridge sold his ring, reportedly needing the cash due to medical expenses.

At this point, IMO, he's forfeited his ownership of it and he very responsibly used an item (the ring) to help cover some expenses.

2. A parent allows a 10-year-old to withdraw thousands of dollars from the kid's college savings fund, in order to purchase a ring. The kid became a collector, IIRC, because his uncle passed away and he had inherited the collecting bug from the uncle. So it became a passion, of the kid, to collect stuff. I have no problem with anything up until this point.

3. Now I have a problem. The kid gets sentimental and decides to give the ring back to The Fridge. AND, The Fridge accepts it...instead of telling the kid, "Hey, you own that. I'm just glad to know who has it and that it's a kid who collects this stuff for the fun of it. No thanks, kid. But your gesture warms my heart. Maybe I can come drink some of your dad's beer?" jk.

4. IMO, who is to judge what the kid does with what he has? But from a personal preference, my dad wouldn't have allowed me to withdraw the cash for the ring in the first place AND my dad wouldn't have let me give it back to the man who sold it. As a dad, I would follow suit and do what I know my dad would have done in that spot as a parent of a kid wanting to spend money on such an item, etc.

A lot of commenters have said The Fridge will just pawn it again and spend it on booze or whatever. Well, maybe he won't. Where I'm disappointed is that The Fridge didn't refuse the ring...then again, it's generally rude to refuse the blessing of someone who WANTS to give you something.

It's just sort of an awkward and confusing story all the way around.

Is it any different than if the kid had bought an ATV for $5000, then donated the ATV to Make A Wish so kids could ride an ATV? I think it is. In my example, he took an item and donated it to less fortunate. In the real story discussed on this thread, the kid gave an item to the person who sold it in the first place.

It's just not as warm and fuzzy as I think it's intended to be. Regardless, the kid has a giving heart (which I think is what everyone on here has been saying, right?). Maybe THAT is the best part of the story then.

Right. He'll be well rewarded down the road I hope. I just found the talking points different than most stories.

HJam72
04-07-2011, 11:57 AM
Hey, Fridge, lemme know when ya wanna sell that ring for $200 (wink, wink).

HoustonFrog
04-07-2011, 12:36 PM
Here is the crappy part of the nice story. Perry's sold at auction for $27,000. The kid probably purchased a replica and then gave it back.

http://www.sportscollectorsdaily.com/nice-gesture-but-perrys-super-bowl-ring-likely-a-replica/

Exactly why he sold it is a bit of mystery, but in 2007, William 'The Refrigerator' Perry's Super Bowl XX championship ring went on the auction block.

The size 23 monster was sold for over $27,000 by the now defunct Mastro Auctions.

Along with it, came this story about the kid and his parents using part of his college fund to buy the ring just so they could present it to Perry, who at times has been down on his luck.

According to the article, the purchase price was $8500. Coincidentally or not, a salesman's sample Perry ring is listed as sold here for that same amount.

It's not likely the real deal could have been picked up for some $19,000 less three years after it was originally sold.

HJam72
04-07-2011, 01:29 PM
Here is the crappy part of the nice story. Perry's sold at auction for $27,000. The kid probably purchased a replica and then gave it back.

http://www.sportscollectorsdaily.com/nice-gesture-but-perrys-super-bowl-ring-likely-a-replica/

Now they're both only worth $6000.

GP
04-07-2011, 02:57 PM
Here is the crappy part of the nice story. Perry's sold at auction for $27,000. The kid probably purchased a replica and then gave it back.

Wait a tick...

So is it possible that the kid purchased a knockoff (err, umm..."replica") ring for thousands of dollars...then ends up giving The Fridge the fake ring???

LOL!

This story is so confusing. Is your story a credible source? If it is, then the kid never bought "The Fridge's" real ring, and he got weepy and gave Perry the "replica," and The Fridge is like, "Aww, that's so sweet of you!" and now there's a family out several grand and they never evenb had the real ring to begin with. Except now The Fridge has a ring he can hock for a few grand.

If this all checks out, then you can't just write comedy THIS good. Only in America.

EDIT: You know what else? It's going to be especially hilarious if it turns out the ring is like 10 sizes smaller than The Fridge's finger size. THAT would be an epic f4i1.

disaacks3
04-07-2011, 03:25 PM
3. Now I have a problem. The kid gets sentimental and decides to give the ring back to The Fridge. AND, The Fridge accepts it...instead of telling the kid, "Hey, you own that. I'm just glad to know who has it and that it's a kid who collects this stuff for the fun of it. No thanks, kid. But your gesture warms my heart. Maybe I can come drink some of your dad's beer?" jk. That's sorta where I fell on this. The kid's heart is definitely in the right place, but why didn't the fridge just say..."thanks for loaning it to me kid, you can have it back when it's time to go to college"

HoustonFrog
04-07-2011, 03:38 PM
Wait a tick...

So is it possible that the kid purchased a knockoff (err, umm..."replica") ring for thousands of dollars...then ends up giving The Fridge the fake ring???

LOL!

This story is so confusing. Is your story a credible source? If it is, then the kid never bought "The Fridge's" real ring, and he got weepy and gave Perry the "replica," and The Fridge is like, "Aww, that's so sweet of you!" and now there's a family out several grand and they never evenb had the real ring to begin with. Except now The Fridge has a ring he can hock for a few grand.

If this all checks out, then you can't just write comedy THIS good. Only in America.

EDIT: You know what else? It's going to be especially hilarious if it turns out the ring is like 10 sizes smaller than The Fridge's finger size. THAT would be an epic f4i1.

It came from the bottom of this Yahoo article..link was embedded.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Boy-10-buys-then-returns-Refrigerator-Perry-?urn=nfl-wp819

A sports collection website rains on the parade a little by pointing out that Perry's ring sold three years ago at auction for $27,000 and it's unlikely the price would have dropped so much since then. Even if Cliff's ring was a replica though, it doesn't change the kindness behind his action.

NitroGSXR
04-08-2011, 12:33 AM
That's sorta where I fell on this. The kid's heart is definitely in the right place, but why didn't the fridge just say..."thanks for loaning it to me kid, you can have it back when it's time to go to college"
This is more telling about what William Perry is all about yet the kid is the one that's getting crucified all over the internet. Assumptions carry very little merit when it comes to the genrosity of our youth these days.

This is a special kid who's lucky to be able to give back to what he thought was right, successful or not. Content should matter very little here...

GP
04-08-2011, 11:27 AM
This is more telling about what William Perry is all about yet the kid is the one that's getting crucified all over the internet. Assumptions carry very little merit when it comes to the genrosity of our youth these days.

This is a special kid who's lucky to be able to give back to what he thought was right, successful or not. Content should matter very little here...

Maybe the kid's act of graciousness will impact The Fridge, or others who are near the situation.

That'd be a good thing to come out of it all. Sometimes God brings along a little messenger, such as that kid, to tell people something important that'll help their lives be better.

Double Barrel
04-08-2011, 07:39 PM
"When Cliff saw the ring, he said he had to have it," Tracy said. "Once I saw the price, I said, 'Absolutely not. We're not buying the ring.'

"He ended up taking money out of his savings account. We told him it was money for college, but he ended up getting the ring."

This part is confusing to me. The kid's parent tells him that he can't do it, but he takes money from his saving account anyway?

How? Does the kid have an ID that the bank recognizes? How did he get to the bank, and then to the restaurant? And no repercussions for basically disregarding his parents "no"? She said "absolutely not", which in my childhood, meant "no freakin' way now shut up about it".

The kid's heart is big, as many are, but I guess "right place" is subjective. I mean I feel for Perry in his condition, but honestly, dude has made millions and blown millions. And with his alcohol problems, he continues to drink in spite of his condition. Sometimes folks are just their own worst enemy.

I'm not criticizing the parents, but I would never let my kid blow his college fund on the ring, much less give it away. JMO.

I work with kids on food drives. This is a direct action>result effort. They go door-to-door to collect the food and see it delivered to a local food pantry. There are lots of things that kids can do to make a positive impact in the world, but it takes adults who can educate and guide them accordingly.

But, as always, to each his own. :)

Rey
04-08-2011, 07:55 PM
I think that the story is being over-analyzed.

Kid shows kind gesture, the end.

HoustonFrog
04-08-2011, 10:11 PM
This part is confusing to me. The kid's parent tells him that he can't do it, but he takes money from his saving account anyway?

How? Does the kid have an ID that the bank recognizes? How did he get to the bank, and then to the restaurant? And no repercussions for basically disregarding his parents "no"? She said "absolutely not", which in my childhood, meant "no freakin' way now shut up about it".

The kid's heart is big, as many are, but I guess "right place" is subjective. I mean I feel for Perry in his condition, but honestly, dude has made millions and blown millions. And with his alcohol problems, he continues to drink in spite of his condition. Sometimes folks are just their own worst enemy.

I'm not criticizing the parents, but I would never let my kid blow his college fund on the ring, much less give it away. JMO.

I work with kids on food drives. This is a direct action>result effort. They go door-to-door to collect the food and see it delivered to a local food pantry. There are lots of things that kids can do to make a positive impact in the world, but it takes adults who can educate and guide them accordingly.

But, as always, to each his own. :)

Really well said and probably better worded than my train of thought above. I guess bottom line for me is that this is a kind and good kid who will always have a big heart but a big heart doesn't mean taking the practical parenting out of the equation from my background (again, not a critisizing of the parents just thinking that most would feel similar when it came to a college fund.)