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Wolf
02-06-2011, 04:49 PM
Some fans who paid $600 for tickets to Super Bowl XLV won't have a place to watch the game.

Hours before kickoff of the Super Bowl, workers were continuing to install temporary, aluminum seating in the top section behind the west end zone. The problem could displace hundreds of fans who purchased tickets to the game.

According to reports, a fire marshall hadn't approved the temporary seating. Affected fans arrived at the game and were handed a letter informing them that they'd no longer have a seat for the game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Green Bay Packers.

Fans will be given a refund equal to three times the face value of the ticket. For those who bought plane tickets and hotel accomodations, that may be a small consolation.

Jerry Jones and the NFL were so concerned about stuffing the most fans possible into Cowboys Stadium in order to maximize profit and set a Super Bowl attendance record, but evidently failed to consider the logistics of seating all those people. If the reports about the fire marshall approval are true, it's a baffling oversight. This is something that should have been taken care of weeks ago.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Super-Bowl-ticket-holders-may-not-have-a-seat-at?urn=nfl-317553

mattieuk
02-06-2011, 04:52 PM
Oh my goodness I hope this isn't true.

If they need an extra seat, take Harrison Ford's. In his interview earlier he didn't look like he gave a crap either way.

JB
02-06-2011, 04:54 PM
They had this on Fox a while ago. There were a number of sections affected. Ticket holders would be relocated or have their money refunded. I think like 1500? Where will they relocate them? Outside? I would be super pissed!

HoustonFrog
02-06-2011, 04:56 PM
Most got relocated. The ones that didn't got triple their value of what they paid.

http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/nfl/news/story?id=6096112

Two hours before the game, workers were frantically trying to fix the sections or get the fans "relocated to similar or better seats," valued at $900. The NFL found alternate seating for 850 of the 1,250 fans affected. The 400 who were not able to be seated were given a refund of triple face value -- $2,700.

mattieuk
02-06-2011, 04:58 PM
Most got relocated. The ones that didn't got triple their value of what they paid.

http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/nfl/news/story?id=6096112

So in effect they got $1800 bucks to cover their airfares, hotel, transport, food, drink to go and watch the Superbowl on a TV, outside the stadium in the cold.

I'd be really freaking pissed!

JB
02-06-2011, 05:03 PM
I wonder where they found room for them? I mean, they were selling tickets to the stairwell. How many open seats could there have been? I doubt they put them in the owners boxes.

CloakNNNdagger
02-06-2011, 05:08 PM
Fox is reporting that most of the fans given alternate seating are looking at the back of others' heads............I'd be "haired" off big time if I were them.........selling tickets for which there is no seating. Way to go Jerry.

Showtime100
02-06-2011, 05:14 PM
But I thought Cowboys Stadium had all those seats, so many they have to install temps?. :spit:

Geezus Jerry.

mattieuk
02-06-2011, 05:15 PM
I wonder where they found room for them? I mean, they were selling tickets to the stairwell. How many open seats could there have been? I doubt they put them in the owners boxes.

Probably threw them in the 'party zone' where you can watch the giant HD TV, and nothing else...

CloakNNNdagger
02-06-2011, 05:28 PM
I wonder where they found room for them? I mean, they were selling tickets to the stairwell. How many open seats could there have been? I doubt they put them in the owners boxes.


........and you would be wrong. Here's a fan who has been offered a "corner box" in Jerry's private castle. He's afraid, though, that if he turns around for an "upgrade" in view, Jerry will have him serving tables.

http://us.123rf.com/400wm/400/400/huntstock/huntstock0911/huntstock091100039/5975745-businessman-standing-and-facing-corner-of-room.jpg

CloakNNNdagger
02-06-2011, 05:34 PM
Probably threw them in the 'party zone' where you can watch the giant HD TV, and nothing else...

They are reported to have been placed in a "party zone" but "with a Tv smaller than in most sports bars.

The first time these temp seats were installed, they were torn out because the inspectors classified them as "unsafe construction." So they reinstalled them..........with the same faulty construction practices and same conclusion by the Fire Marshal.

Showtime100
02-06-2011, 05:41 PM
They are reported to have been placed in a "party zone" but "with a Tv smaller than in most sports bars.

The first time these temp seats were installed, they were torn out because the inspectors classified them as "unsafe construction." So they reinstalled them..........with the same faulty construction practices and same conclusion by the Fire Marshal.

I smell lawyers before all is said and done.

GlassHalfFull
02-07-2011, 05:42 AM
So in effect they got $1800 bucks to cover their airfares, hotel, transport, food, drink to go and watch the Superbowl on a TV, outside the stadium in the cold.

I'd be really freaking pissed!

They are giving them 3X face value, but most people paid way more than that for their tickets. So they are out their travel costs, plus the whatever they paid over 3X the ticket cost. Yikes, do we have a Jerrah facepalm??

drs23
02-07-2011, 09:42 AM
I smell lawyers before all is said and done.

Ya think? Me too. I think I can smell them from here. And rightfully so. IMO

Dutchrudder
02-07-2011, 10:39 AM
I couldn't imagine spending all that time planning the trip to go to the Super Bowl to watch my team only to be denied the seats I paid for. 3x? Yeah for ALL of my expenses, not just the seats. Time, hotel, food, expensive beer, missing a once in a lifetime opportunity and standing out in the cold watching a crappy TV. What a joke, this is not going away with a simple refund.

disaacks3
02-07-2011, 10:51 AM
I listened to the 610 gang and Mclame discussing the situation this morning. It's unbelievable that these seats weren't already installed / tested / certified LONG before the Superbowl. It's not as if the Cowboys were a playoff team and access to the stadium were an issue.

Double Barrel
02-07-2011, 10:51 AM
Way to go NFL and Jerrah. This story is the perfect metaphor for what the NFL is turning into: squeeze as much cash out of fans that you can and offer them little when you fail to deliver. Heck, that might even be the corporate mission statement for many of these teams.

GP
02-07-2011, 11:00 AM
I think I figured it out.

Bob says "The Super Bowl is the only bottom line that matters."

It's clear now, to me, that Bob wants us to host a Super Bowl and squeeze as many nickels and dimes out of fans as Jerry did. Because THAT is a bottom line that will definitely matter to Bob McNickels & Dimes.

Just teasing. Trying to get a laugh or two here.

stingray
02-07-2011, 03:06 PM
Well, the compensation got even better. Free tickets to next years Super Bowl.

http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/nfl/news/story?id=6098112

disaacks3
02-07-2011, 03:29 PM
Well, the compensation got even better. Free tickets to next years Super Bowl.

http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/nfl/news/story?id=6098112 For those too lazy to click...

NFL offers free tickets to next Super Bowl to compensate 400 fans
Posted by Michael David Smith on February 7, 2011, 10:42 AM EST
The 400 fans who were forced to watch Super Bowl XLV on TV because their tickets were for temporary seating in Cowboys Stadium that never got finished will get in to Super Bowl XLVI for free.

That was revealed this morning by NFL PR guy Brian McCarthy, who’s trying to put the best spin possible on what the NFL is doing for the fans whose $800 tickets weren’t honored.

“The 400 fans w/out seats last nite went on field postgame, received free merchandise, food, beverage, $2,400, free SB46 tix,” McCarthy tweeted

mattieuk
02-07-2011, 03:33 PM
For those too lazy to click...

It is getting better, but only marginally if you are a Green Bay fan, who missed out on seeing your team win it for the first time in a few years, and next year they don't make the Superbowl.

Perhaps the NFL are only offering this, because they don't think there will be a Superbowl next year :kitten:

Wolf
02-08-2011, 05:18 AM
Boy did they drop the ball

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AhLWjGhp1.AqTRaTbLFqXdI5nYcB?slug=ap-superbowl-seatproblems

Grams
02-08-2011, 06:00 AM
They are reported to have been placed in a "party zone" but "with a Tv smaller than in most sports bars.

The first time these temp seats were installed, they were torn out because the inspectors classified them as "unsafe construction." So they reinstalled them..........with the same faulty construction practices and same conclusion by the Fire Marshal.

I also heard on the radio yesterday that the "party zone" TV was smaller and did not have the broadcast feed. No commentators, no firstdown lines, no clock, no score, no replays.

cdollaz
02-08-2011, 11:25 AM
The NFL is being really stupid WRT this. It is 100% their fault.

For a league that brings in money like the NFL does, they need to do the right thing, spend a little of it, and make it right for those customers whom they failed.

JB
02-08-2011, 11:49 AM
The NFL is being really stupid WRT this. It is 100% their fault.

For a league that brings in money like the NFL does, they need to do the right thing, spend a little of it, and make it right for those customers whom they failed.

And what should they do to "make it right"?

cdollaz
02-08-2011, 12:10 PM
And what should they do to "make it right"?

Cover ALL of their monetary expenses (travel, lodging, etc.) and the price they actually paid for their tickets, if higher than the face value. Basically they need to make them financially whole as they were not provided what they paid for. The NFL didn't perform.

The current offer of sending them to the game next year is a good gesture as well.

The NFL is getting a ton of bad PR over this, and they cost to rectify it would be small in comparison.

Joe Texan
02-08-2011, 12:37 PM
We had a nice tailgate right outside the stadium with digital TV and grilled ribs and fajitas, baked beans and potatoe salad,Texans Tennesee bean bag toss and it could not have been better unless some of yall could have come.
We could have thrown a stone and hit the stadium

CloakNNNdagger
02-08-2011, 01:57 PM
We had a nice tailgate right outside the stadium with digital TV and grilled ribs and fajitas, baked beans and potatoe salad,Texans Tennesee bean bag toss and it could not have been better unless some of yall could have come.
We could have thrown a stone and hit the stadium
Why settle for a STONE..............Why not a BOMB???:cool:

CloakNNNdagger
02-09-2011, 10:14 AM
From PFT.

Wheels are in motion for a Super Bowl lawsuitPosted by Mike Florio on February 8, 2011, 1:35 PM EST
The 400 fans who bought tickets to the Super Bowl that didn’t result in seats at the Super Bowl have been offered a triple refund and a ticket to next year’s game.

It remains to be seen whether and to what extent any of them want it.

Multiple websites already have popped up, with the apparent aim of gathering the affected fans and pursuing legal action. The sites, including SuperBowlSuit.com and SueSuperBowl.com, infringe on the league’s most protected trademark via the use of Lamar Hunt’s brainchild, which ironically could lead to litigation. That said, it’s unlikely the league will sue any of the 400 people who are taking steps to respond to the indignity of showing up for the biggest sporting event in the country and finding out for the first time that they’ve got only a ticket to ride to the Party Pass area.

Given that some tickets came from the Packers and that some came from the Steelers, lawyers assessing the possibility of filing suit should consider the consumer protection laws of Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Texas, and New York, site of the league office. Though each ticket holder could file his or her own lawsuit, it’s likely that one or more will hire a lawyer and file a class action aimed at representing the interests of all 400 folks who were denied their seats.

In the end, there could be more than one class action, which will then require the court system to sort through the ensuing mess.

And don’t forget about the 850 who supposedly were given comparable or better accommodations. Under the consumer protection laws of one or more of the states in question, it may not matter whether comparable or better seats were provided. It’s possible that the laws could be interpreted to require that consumers get exactly what they paid for, and that anything else constitutes a violation of the law.

Stay tuned. This one could get interesting, soon.

FOX NEWS just reported ~10:10 that there is an AP "alert" stating that lawsuits have been officially filed.

CloakNNNdagger
02-09-2011, 10:19 AM
Especially egregious is what happened on Sunday included the "Founders."

Fans sue NFL, Cowboys over Super Bowl ticket snafu (http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/09022011/2/fans-sue-nfl-cowboys-super-bowl-ticket-snafu.html)

Wed, 09 Feb 16:08:00 2011

Plaintiffs seek at least $5 mil compensatory damages

Angry football fans have sued the National Football League and the Dallas Cowboys, saying they were denied seats to Sunday's Super Bowl despite having paid thousands of dollars for tickets.

The lawsuit was filed after the league admitted to mistakes that left about 400 paying fans unable to watch Super Bowl XLV in person -- or able to see the field only on TV screens -- and other Cowboys' season ticket-holders watching from temporary metal chairs with obstructed views.

Fans filed the lawsuit late Tuesday in federal court in Dallas, accusing the league and team with breach of contract, fraud and deceptive trade practices.

They are seeking class-action status, more than $5 million of damages and unspecified punitive damages.

The NFL and the Cowboys declined to comment on the lawsuit. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones is also a defendant in the case.

In Sunday's Super Bowl game, the Green Bay Packers defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers 31-25 before more than 103,000 people at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

The league on Tuesday had invited the 400 affected fans who paid for tickets but did not get a seat at the game to a future Super Bowl of their choice.

It also offered the choice of a cash payment of $2,400 -- three times the face value of the ticket -- or round-trip airfare and a hotel. Many shut-out fans paid above face value for the tickets, according to the lawsuit.

"We are ultimately responsible for the fan experience and we want it to be the best it can possibly be," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement on Tuesday.

The lawsuit contended that the NFL knew of seating problems before the game, but failed to tell fans in advance.

It also accused Jones of causing the problems with the hope of setting a Super Bowl attendance record. He fell short by 766, after some temporary seats were deemed unusable.

Many affected fans ended up watching the game in standing-only positions or places in a club area behind the Steelers bench where they could watch the game on TV monitors.

The lawsuit, filed by law firm Eagan Avenatti LLP, also accused Jones of deceiving Cowboys season ticket-holders known as "Founders" into paying $1,200 a seat for Super Bowl tickets, only to be offered temporary metal fold-out chairs, many with obstructed views of the field and the stadium's giant overhead video board.

These Founders, who paid more than $100 million for seat licenses to help fund construction of Cowboys Stadium, said the team had promised that their $100,000-and-higher licenses would entitle them to the "best sightlines" and the right to buy a Super Bowl ticket at face value, according to the lawsuit.

"Frankly, it is astounding to us that the Cowboys and the NFL would treat its fans like this," lead attorney Michael Avenatti said in a telephone interview. "What is perhaps even more amazing is that they still haven't done the right thing."

The NFL needs to fully compensate the distressed fans for their out-of-pocket expenses, he added.

The case is Simms et al v. Jones et al, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Texas, No. 11-00248.

Double Barrel
02-09-2011, 10:42 AM
"Frankly, it is astounding to us that the Cowboys and the NFL would treat its fans like this,"

The NFL no longer gives a rat's ass about the little guy. They see fans as nothing but consumers to be squeezed for more and more profits. I understand that the NFL is a business at the end of the day, but it's morphing into nothing but a business. It's certainly not our grandpa's NFL.

TheCD
02-09-2011, 12:08 PM
These fans have the original promise of triple the cost of the tickets plus a ticket to next year's game, or a (seemingly) better option:

2. One free ticket to a future Super Bowl game of the fan’s choice, including next year’s if so desired, plus round-trip airfare and hotel accommodations provided by the NFL. This offer will be personalized in the ticketholder’s name and is not transferable.”



http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/02/08/nfl-offers-second-option-to-fans-that-lost-super-bowl-seat/

If I were a fan I'd probably take this offer and be happy...pending that the NFL also paid for my expenses for this Super Bowl as well.

Showtime100
02-09-2011, 12:23 PM
These fans have the original promise of triple the cost of the tickets plus a ticket to next year's game, or a (seemingly) better option:



http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/02/08/nfl-offers-second-option-to-fans-that-lost-super-bowl-seat/

If I were a fan I'd probably take this offer and be happy...pending that the NFL also paid for my expenses for this Super Bowl as well.

Meh, same here I guess. As long as the NFL understood it cost me $5 mil to get there, lodge, and eat.

I've read some things that would make me pretty angry. Especially if I had been promised one thing and given another. Paid for THIS and got that.

CloakNNNdagger
02-10-2011, 07:44 AM
In court, being asked how this ever could have happened:

Defendant NFL: I know nothing!

Sergeant Schultz: What he said.
http://gallery.trupela.com/albums/userpics/10001/Sergeant_Schultz.jpg

Defendant Jerry: I know less than nothing!

************************************************** ***************
Class action includes Cowboys PSL owners (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/02/09/class-action-includes-cowboys-psl-owners/)

On Wednesday, a Los Angeles firm filed the first lawsuit arising from the seating fiasco at Super Bowl XLV. With the help of our friends at KXAS, the NBC affiliate in Fort Worth, we’ve obtained a copy of the complaint.

The named plaintiffs are Steve Simms and Mike Dolabi. Simms, a Pennsylvania resident, purchased one of the 400 tickets that didn’t translate to a seat in the stadium. Dolabi, a Texas resident, obtained the right to buy tickets to the Super Bowl via his purchase of a $100,000 Personal Seat License along with season tickets to Cowboys games.

And that’s the eye-opener. First reported by Kevin Armstrong of the New York Daily News and mentioned earlier today on PFT Live, PSL owners and season-ticket holders reportedly paid $1,200 per seat to attend the Super Bowl, and per the complaint they allegedly had obstructed views and “temporary metal fold out chairs.” The seats also allegedly “lacked any reasonable view of the stadium’s prized ‘video board,’ which Defendant [Jerry] Jones and the Cowboys routinely claim is one of the most unique and best features of Cowboys Stadium.”

The specific number of Cowboys season-ticket holders affected by the allegedly substandard seats and sight lines isn’t identified. At paragraph 4.6, the complaint alleges that “most” of the Cowboys season-ticket holders who purchased Super Bowl tickets received, as described in paragraph 4.10, “obstructed and illegitimate seats.”

The thrust of the case still seems to be the 400 who bought tickets to the game but were denied admission. The complaint scoffs at the offer of a triple refund and a free ticket to next year’s Super Bowl (the NFL has since expanded the offer to provide a ticket to any future Super Bowl), explaining that “this monetary sum is wholly insufficient to compensate Plaintiffs for all of their expenses, including but not limited to travel costs, or for their disappointment and frustration in not being able to properly enjoy the Super Bowl” and that “triple the face value does not in many cases begin to approach the cost of the tickets paid by many class members.”

The case seeks financial damages under four legal theories: breach of contract; breach of the “covenant of good faith and fair dealing” (that’s legalese for an implied promise that one side to a transaction won’t try to unfairly screw the other side); fraud, deceit, and concealment, arising from the admitted failure to advise the 400 ticket holders of the possible unavailability of their seats and from the alleged failure to inform the Cowboys season-ticket holders that they’d be getting lesser accommodations than those to which they were accustomed; and violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act.

The lawsuit seeks compensation for all financial losses (travel expenses, lodging, etc.) arising from a trip to the Super Bowl that didn’t result in actually attending the Super Bowl in the seats that were purchased, treble damages under the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, and attorneys’ fees. The complaint also seeks an award of punitive damages, a controversial tool for punishing intentional wrongdoing and for deterring the defendants and others from engaging in similar behavior in the future.

Omitted from this class action are the 850 ticket holders who supposedly received comparable or better seats in lieu of the seats they purchased. As MDS pointed out earlier tonight, accounts contradicting the “comparable or better” allegation are emerging. Unless the current class action is amended, any potential legal rights of those folks will have to be pursued via a separate lawsuit.

We’ll continue to follow this case as it develops. NFL executive V.P. of business ventures Eric Grubman is scheduled to join PFT Live on Thursday to discuss the situation.

wagonhed
02-10-2011, 09:31 AM
They really need to do something that makes it impossible to resell Superbowl tickets. Give each ticket a special ID according to who bought it. It's ridiculous that people have to spend thousands of dollars for one when the face is only a few hundred. Makes the Superbowl one of the quietest games every year, because 90% of the "fans" aren't really football fans, they're just rich people.

Joe Texan
02-13-2011, 11:43 PM
They really need to do something that makes it impossible to resell Superbowl tickets. Give each ticket a special ID according to who bought it. It's ridiculous that people have to spend thousands of dollars for one when the face is only a few hundred. Makes the Superbowl one of the quietest games every year, because 90% of the "fans" aren't really football fans, they're just rich people.

face is 900 on the ones I saw

CloakNNNdagger
02-14-2011, 12:01 PM
They really need to do something that makes it impossible to resell Superbowl tickets. Give each ticket a special ID according to who bought it. It's ridiculous that people have to spend thousands of dollars for one when the face is only a few hundred. Makes the Superbowl one of the quietest games every year, because 90% of the "fans" aren't really football fans, they're just rich people.

face is 900 on the ones I saw

May put the question of SB ticket prices in perspective.: Super Bowl XLV game plan: How to score on travel packages to the big game in Arlington (Super Bowl XLV game plan: How to score on travel packages to the big game in Arlington)

GuerillaBlack
02-14-2011, 12:24 PM
February 12, 2011, 7:00 am
Super Bowl Seating Fiasco Began With Jerry Jones’s Wish to Set Record
By TONI MONKOVIC

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram has provided a time line of the botched preparations for the temporary seating at the Super Bowl. The Star-Telegram said “the information is from e-mails and documents released Friday by the city of Arlington in response to a request under the Texas Public Information Act.”

The blow-by-blow is not pretty.

The article said, “As late as 10 as days before kickoff, city inspectors were still asking the Cowboys to provide a total seat count.”

Normally, the league takes over Super Bowl stadium issues. But on Thursday in an interview Mike Florio of ProFootballTalk.com, the N.F.L. executive Eric Grubman said “the Cowboys were involved in hiring the contractor to install the seats.”

The Cowboys are not commenting, but there’s no question where this problem originated. One of the items in the time line is:

Jan. 26: Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells the Star-Telegram of his desire to break the Super Bowl attendance record: “I think we’ve got a good chance to break the record without counting anything outside. The stadium is certified for 111,700. When we built this stadium, I had in mind being able to reach those kinds of numbers.”

Then there’s this sequence, from Florio’s interview with Grubman:


MF: Was it a priority for Jerry Jones and the Cowboys to break that record?

EG: You’ll have to ask the Cowboys.

MF: But if you had been working with the Cowboys and Jerry Jones leading up to the game and I assume you did, did you pick up on anything from those communications that it was an issue, a desire for them to break the record of 130,985?

EG: Yes, I think they were very interested in breaking the record.

In the time line, one Arlington building official tells his boss in an e-mail: “I think that the Cowboys are not going to correct certain items and assume the risk. This is not a good situation!” And the response is: “Bottom line is if it is not right, don’t approve it.”

They didn’t, and a possibly dangerous situation was averted. Florio wrote: “It took a certain amount of courage for local officials to stand up to the most significant and powerful local business entity on the biggest day in the young life of the biggest stadium in the country. If the seats that were still being slapped together hours before the game had been used and had failed, we’d now be trying to sift through the mess and allocate blame.”

Extra point: Jones wanted it to be the biggest. He got it: a colossal failure.
(And after all that, no, the Cowboys didn’t break the record, falling 766 short.)

http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/12/super-bowl-seating-fiasco-began-with-jerry-joness-wish-to-set-record/

Wolf
05-29-2011, 09:12 AM
DALLAS (AP)—The NFL and the Dallas Cowboys have asked a federal court judge to dismiss the class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of Super Bowl ticket holders who wound up with no seats for the game.

About 1,250 temporary seats at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington were deemed unsafe just hours before the Feb. 6 game between the Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers. That forced about 850 ticket holders to move to new seats and 400 others to watch the game from standing-room locations.

A 26-page motion filed by the league and the team on Thursday says the ticket holders aren’t entitled to compensation beyond what they’ve already been offered. It also says the ticket holders weren’t defrauded as a result of the fiasco.

The motion states that the NFL could revoke ticket-holding privileges as long as it provided a refund. In this instance, the league said it went “beyond its contractual obligations” when it offered displaced fans the actual prices they paid for their tickets as well as all documented travel, lodging and meal expenses

According to the motion, the NFL and the Cowboys didn’t know until just before the game that the temporary seats would be inadequate and worked into the afternoon that day to deal with the issue.

“Defendants had nothing to gain by tricking ticket holders,” the filing says. “With the eyes of the world focusing on the Super Bowl, it is implausible to suggest that defendants intended what would obviously be a public relations nightmare.”

Michael Avenatti, a Los Angeles attorney who is representing the ticket holders, said the motion represents flawed thinking by the league and the team.

“The defendants have a fundamental misunderstanding of what their obligations are under the law,” he said.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=Am_M485nre6606ap.x.d3RtDubYF?slug=ap-superbowl-seatingmess

CloakNNNdagger
05-29-2011, 10:48 AM
http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=Am_M485nre6606ap.x.d3RtDubYF?slug=ap-superbowl-seatingmess

Michael Avenatti, a Los Angeles attorney who is representing the ticket holders, said the motion represents flawed thinking by the league and the team.

Fancy that..........the league may have "flawed thinking." That must have come like a bolt of lightning out of nowhere for the league!:shots: