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xreadx
10-22-2010, 10:20 PM
I think in all fairness to the game, the home team should have brighter flags than the away team to even the playing field.. Wonder what colors well have.

elliepoo
10-22-2010, 10:47 PM
I've only been watching football since 2006, but I have come to really LOVE the sport. One of my favorite things about the game is how physical of a sport it is. The players are so full of emotion and you can see it in their aggressiveness on the field. I feel that it is kind of taking away some of the emotion of the game and that makes me sad because I feel what my team's players feels. Will I have to lock up and put away the barbarian in me?

buddyboy
10-22-2010, 10:56 PM
Yeah, we as consumers love seeing the big plays and the big hits. That's why we watch action movies.

The problem with that is that these players are real and they are seriously putting their lives on the line. Oh no, I won't get to feel "the barbarian in me"! Well, guess what, it's making it safer for human beings.

Unless you want to see more and more players get seriously injured, maybe you should slow down.

elliepoo
10-22-2010, 11:09 PM
Yeah, we as consumers love seeing the big plays and the big hits. That's why we watch action movies.

The problem with that is that these players are real and they are seriously putting their lives on the line. Oh no, I won't get to feel "the barbarian in me"! Well, guess what, it's making it safer for human beings.

Unless you want to see more and more players get seriously injured, maybe you should slow down.


I understand and I do feel bad when players suffer injuries and concussions, but isn't that a danger associated with this physical sport? Certain professions have a level of danger associated with them, like police men for instance.

I'd like to know where the new rule came from? Was there suddenly been a spike in injuries for this rule to be implemented? What is different now than when the NFL first started? Like I said, I've only been watching this sport since 2006 so I'm still learning A LOT. Will defensive players play with a different energy having to focus on the way they hit? Will it change the game? I don't know.

Pollardized
10-22-2010, 11:15 PM
I understand and I do feel bad when players suffer injuries and concussions, but isn't that a danger associated with this physical sport? Certain professions have a level of danger associated with them, like police men for instance.

I'd like to know where the new rule came from? Was there suddenly been a spike in injuries for this rule to be implemented? What is different now than when the NFL first started? Like I said, I've only been watching this sport since 2006 so I'm still learning A LOT. Will defensive players play with a different energy having to focus on the way they hit? Will it change the game? I don't know.

Will Bernard Pollard stop knocking the PISS out of people? Will the Texans D keep a quarterback from looking like Joe Montana this year? Who shot J.R.? Did the little piggy cry "wee weee weeee" all the way home?

All this and more on the next episode of Houston Texans football..... Filmed live before a studio audience.

Showtime100
10-22-2010, 11:15 PM
I've only been watching football since 2006, but I have come to really LOVE the sport. One of my favorite things about the game is how physical of a sport it is. The players are so full of emotion and you can see it in their aggressiveness on the field. I feel that it is kind of taking away some of the emotion of the game and that makes me sad because I feel what my team's players feels. Will I have to lock up and put away the barbarian in me?

That's an NHL fan in the making right there. http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r65/ShowtimeN15580/Dallas%20Stars/nhl2.gif

elliepoo
10-22-2010, 11:20 PM
That's an NHL fan in the making right there. http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r65/ShowtimeN15580/Dallas%20Stars/nhl2.gif

No. I don't enjoy Hockey actually. I like the pace of football. It gives me time to soak in and process what's happened and what's going to happen. I like celebrating 1st down conversions and getting aggressively crunk, I guess you could say, when someone gets Pollardized.

drs23
10-22-2010, 11:24 PM
That's an NHL fan in the making right there. http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r65/ShowtimeN15580/Dallas%20Stars/nhl2.gif

Got the aroma of a GP skit to me.:kubepalm:

Showtime100
10-22-2010, 11:24 PM
No. I don't enjoy Hockey actually. I like the pace of football. It gives me time to soak in and process what's happened and what's going to happen. I like celebrating 1st down conversions and getting aggressively crunk, I guess you could say, when someone gets Pollardized.

Very cool. Just horsing around. Welcome to the board! :tiphat:

Showtime100
10-22-2010, 11:26 PM
Got the aroma of a GP skit to me.:kubepalm:

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r65/ShowtimeN15580/Emoticons%20II/reaction.gif

elliepoo
10-22-2010, 11:29 PM
Very cool. Just horsing around. Welcome to the board! :tiphat:

Thanks for the welcome! :)

brakos82
10-22-2010, 11:30 PM
Will Bernard Pollard stop knocking the PISS out of people? Will the Texans D keep a quarterback from looking like Joe Montana this year? Who shot J.R.? Did the little piggy cry "wee weee weeee" all the way home?

All this and more on the next episode of Houston Texans football..... Filmed live before a studio audience.

Does Bill Cowher make for a bad therapist?

Texan_Bill
10-22-2010, 11:35 PM
Does Bill Cowher make for a bad therapist?


"Did the little piggy cry 'Wee! Wee! Wee!' all the way home?"

http://thebrainchildgroup.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Picture-391.png






You "Jackwagon!!!!"http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_7CWhPK6yL-M/RnkqZ6OvKqI/AAAAAAAAADI/fhFwosp0mYU/s320/drill+sergeant.jpg

Showtime100
10-22-2010, 11:40 PM
Thanks for the welcome! :)

You bet!

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r65/ShowtimeN15580/Emoticons%20II/thumbs_up.jpg

xreadx
10-22-2010, 11:46 PM
Makes me not wanna even watch football anymore. I hope pollard puts his helmet in someones chest there heart explodes and the fukkin DIE! then we will ask rodger, what we gonna do now???

xreadx
10-22-2010, 11:49 PM
I breath benzine every day so that everyone in the USA has fuel to put in there cars, and so rodger can fuel up his lamborghini...

buddyboy
10-22-2010, 11:52 PM
I understand and I do feel bad when players suffer injuries and concussions, but isn't that a danger associated with this physical sport? Certain professions have a level of danger associated with them, like police men for instance.

I'd like to know where the new rule came from? Was there suddenly been a spike in injuries for this rule to be implemented? What is different now than when the NFL first started? Like I said, I've only been watching this sport since 2006 so I'm still learning A LOT. Will defensive players play with a different energy having to focus on the way they hit? Will it change the game? I don't know.

Exactly, there's a risk for every profession. But if you found something that could make a policeman's job safer, like making every cop wear a vest at all times, you would. In the NFL, guys out there are trying to make a living, not trying to get injuries to the brain that could potentially harm them in the long run. I feel like lots of sports are starting to take concussions more seriously now.

xreadx
10-22-2010, 11:58 PM
Exactly, there's a risk for every profession. But if you found something that could make a policeman's job safer, like making every cop wear a vest at all times, you would. In the NFL, guys out there are trying to make a living, not trying to get injuries to the brain that could potentially harm them in the long run. I feel like lots of sports are starting to take concussions more seriously now.

YOU CANT MAKE IT SAFER without takeing away from the game. If I wanted to watch soccer I would............

xreadx
10-22-2010, 11:58 PM
“Here’s another situation, too. You’re going to get guys avoiding the
head and then they’re going to start going for the knees and then you’re
going to start seeing more ACL tears than ever before. Then you’re
going to have six-month injuries instead of 2-3-week concussions. I
don’t know what you’re going to do. It’s a... violent game. It’s a game
that people love to watch because it is violent. There’s big hits and
there’s big collisions and just a lot of activity. That’s something for
the NFL to decide, how they’re going to correct it.” -Cushing

elliepoo
10-23-2010, 12:19 AM
Exactly, there's a risk for every profession. But if you found something that could make a policeman's job safer, like making every cop wear a vest at all times, you would. In the NFL, guys out there are trying to make a living, not trying to get injuries to the brain that could potentially harm them in the long run. I feel like lots of sports are starting to take concussions more seriously now.

I still feel it's taking away from the physical nature of the game. You can give a cop vests and guns to protect himself, but he still has to put himself in dangerous situations to protect citizens. You can't control the environment around him.

You can give a football player the proper equipment to protect himself, but he's still got to go out on the field and run the risk of injury to his body. The NFL has the power to put its employees in safer situations by controlling the dangerous factors, though, so I can see why they are in favor of the rule. They are doing everything possible to make it safer for them.

I know what you're saying and I'm not at all trying to attack, but that's just my opinion. :) I feel the NFL is controlling the game too much. But it is what it is and all we can do as fans is accept it and continue watching.

Nawzer
10-23-2010, 12:39 AM
Makes me not wanna even watch football anymore. I hope pollard puts his helmet in someones chest there heart explodes and the fukkin DIE! then we will ask rodger, what we gonna do now???

:wadepalm:

wagonhed
10-23-2010, 01:12 AM
*overreacts*

*flails arms*

ubecool454
10-23-2010, 03:30 AM
I've only been watching football since 2006, but I have come to really LOVE the sport. One of my favorite things about the game is how physical of a sport it is. The players are so full of emotion and you can see it in their aggressiveness on the field. I feel that it is kind of taking away some of the emotion of the game and that makes me sad because I feel what my team's players feels. Will I have to lock up and put away the barbarian in me?

What country are you from?:kubepalm:

powerfuldragon
10-23-2010, 05:02 AM
this thread gave me a migraine.

False Start
10-23-2010, 09:46 AM
That's an NHL fan in the making right there. http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r65/ShowtimeN15580/Dallas%20Stars/nhl2.gif

Well he said he likes football, which is now the No Hit League. http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii202/J4103V/rimshot-2.gif

JB
10-23-2010, 09:55 AM
I understand and I do feel bad when players suffer injuries and concussions, but isn't that a danger associated with this physical sport? Certain professions have a level of danger associated with them, like police men for instance.

I'd like to know where the new rule came from? Was there suddenly been a spike in injuries for this rule to be implemented? What is different now than when the NFL first started? Like I said, I've only been watching this sport since 2006 so I'm still learning A LOT. Will defensive players play with a different energy having to focus on the way they hit? Will it change the game? I don't know.


There is no new rule. There has been no changing in the wording of the rule. They are just getting the word out that they are going to penalize infractions of the current rules more stringently. Perhaps there is a bit of over reaction by too many. I don't foresee a big change in the way the games are played.

elliepoo
10-23-2010, 09:57 AM
What country are you from?:kubepalm:

I just didn't grow up watching football is all. My boyfriend introduced and explained it to me.

buddyboy
10-23-2010, 01:37 PM
I still feel it's taking away from the physical nature of the game. You can give a cop vests and guns to protect himself, but he still has to put himself in dangerous situations to protect citizens. You can't control the environment around him.

You can give a football player the proper equipment to protect himself, but he's still got to go out on the field and run the risk of injury to his body. The NFL has the power to put its employees in safer situations by controlling the dangerous factors, though, so I can see why they are in favor of the rule. They are doing everything possible to make it safer for them.

I know what you're saying and I'm not at all trying to attack, but that's just my opinion. :) I feel the NFL is controlling the game too much. But it is what it is and all we can do as fans is accept it and continue watching.

Good post

I completely agree. There's a risk all the time and I agree that it is taking away from the physical nature.

But I'm never going to put my viewing pleasure over the safety of players.

I do, however, think the NFL is being a bit too nitpicky on the group celebration stuff.

SrslySirius
10-23-2010, 01:47 PM
This isn't a discussion about the Texans, but whatever, I'll jump in anyway.

The league is trying to discourage spearing. Helmet-to-helmet hits. Spearing is not an effective technique for stopping a ball-handler. You'll have more luck wrapping up and bringing the guy down. The only purpose spearing serves is to hurt people. Maybe knock them out of the game.

If that sort of thing is your cup of tea, that's cool. A lot of people are sadists. Boxing has always been a popular sport and MMA is on the rise. Some Nascar fans don't really care about auto racing and just watch to see crashes. On that same token: football isn't all about the violence, and if you really think these rules are going to ruin the game, then maybe you're watching it for the wrong reasons. Most of us are more impressed with dazzling one-handed catches, excellent blocking, runningbacks with great vision and cutting, timely blitzes, the chess-match of play calling, and stuff like that. If you don't care about any of that stuff and would rather see Albert Haynseworth stomp on people's heads, or watch bodies pile up on stretchers, then you're watching the wrong sport. You might consider canceling your NFL Network subscription and catch the Brock Lesnar fight instead.

There will still be plenty of violence in football without spearing. That's the nature of the game; a necessary evil. When these players retire they'll still be using walkers and wheelchairs. That knee cartilage will still be nice and worn down, and their bones brittle and broken. But maybe this generation of players will still know their names and recognize their kid's faces. If that offends you somehow, you're just an immature twat. Simple as that.

Showtime100
10-23-2010, 03:06 PM
This isn't a discussion about the Texans, but whatever, I'll jump in anyway.

The league is trying to discourage spearing. Helmet-to-helmet hits. Spearing is not an effective technique for stopping a ball-handler. You'll have more luck wrapping up and bringing the guy down. The only purpose spearing serves is to hurt people. Maybe knock them out of the game.

If that sort of thing is your cup of tea, that's cool. A lot of people are sadists. Boxing has always been a popular sport and MMA is on the rise. Some Nascar fans don't really care about auto racing and just watch to see crashes. On that same token: football isn't all about the violence, and if you really think these rules are going to ruin the game, then maybe you're watching it for the wrong reasons. Most of us are more impressed with dazzling one-handed catches, excellent blocking, runningbacks with great vision and cutting, timely blitzes, the chess-match of play calling, and stuff like that. If you don't care about any of that stuff and would rather see Albert Haynseworth stomp on people's heads, or watch bodies pile up on stretchers, then you're watching the wrong sport. You might consider canceling your NFL Network subscription and catch the Brock Lesnar fight instead.

There will still be plenty of violence in football without spearing. That's the nature of the game; a necessary evil. When these players retire they'll still be using walkers and wheelchairs. That knee cartilage will still be nice and worn down, and their bones brittle and broken. But maybe this generation of players will still know their names and recognize their kid's faces. If that offends you somehow, you're just an immature twat. Simple as that.

So getting back to the point, the problem is how they are going about getting the illegal hits out of the game. Everybody on this board (I'm sure) agrees with getting hits with bad intentions out of the NFL. The problem is they are fining players for good, clean hits.

If a players gets a penalty for an inadvertant helmet-to-helmet hit I'm cool with that. But excessive fines (maybe a fine, depends) and suspensions? No, save that for head-stomping and deliberate spearing. The NFL has the intelligence to know which is which. A player can't play up to his potential with only good hard football in his mind worrying about those things. He wasn't trained from day-one to play that way.

There, IMO, is the problem most are having with what is going on with the NFL and helmet-to-helmet hits.

gtexan02
10-23-2010, 03:22 PM
Im pretty sure we've already had this discussion in the NFL forum. How is this about the Texans?

mexican_texan
10-23-2010, 03:57 PM
this thread gave me a migraine.

I thought I was alone.

wagonhed
10-23-2010, 06:12 PM
This isn't a discussion about the Texans, but whatever, I'll jump in anyway.

The league is trying to discourage spearing. Helmet-to-helmet hits. Spearing is not an effective technique for stopping a ball-handler. You'll have more luck wrapping up and bringing the guy down. The only purpose spearing serves is to hurt people. Maybe knock them out of the game.

If that sort of thing is your cup of tea, that's cool. A lot of people are sadists. Boxing has always been a popular sport and MMA is on the rise. Some Nascar fans don't really care about auto racing and just watch to see crashes. On that same token: football isn't all about the violence, and if you really think these rules are going to ruin the game, then maybe you're watching it for the wrong reasons. Most of us are more impressed with dazzling one-handed catches, excellent blocking, runningbacks with great vision and cutting, timely blitzes, the chess-match of play calling, and stuff like that. If you don't care about any of that stuff and would rather see Albert Haynseworth stomp on people's heads, or watch bodies pile up on stretchers, then you're watching the wrong sport. You might consider canceling your NFL Network subscription and catch the Brock Lesnar fight instead.

There will still be plenty of violence in football without spearing. That's the nature of the game; a necessary evil. When these players retire they'll still be using walkers and wheelchairs. That knee cartilage will still be nice and worn down, and their bones brittle and broken. But maybe this generation of players will still know their names and recognize their kid's faces. If that offends you somehow, you're just an immature twat. Simple as that.
Great post. Seriously. I have nothing to add.

Rey
10-23-2010, 06:48 PM
The league is trying to discourage spearing. Helmet-to-helmet hits. Spearing is not an effective technique for stopping a ball-handler. You'll have more luck wrapping up and bringing the guy down. The only purpose spearing serves is to hurt people. Maybe knock them out of the game.


I don't know what you were saying with the bold, but instead of the period is should be the word 'and'. Spearing and helmet to helmet hits aren't the same.

Spearing serves no purpose what so ever and is just poor technique. It's not any more likely to knock the opposition out of the game than a good legal hit.

The reason spearing is frowned upon is because the person committing the act can paralyze themselves or cause serious spinal or neck injuries. The no spearing rule is actually designed to keep the person committing the foul safe and has very little to do with the person actually getting speared.

SrslySirius
10-23-2010, 09:09 PM
If a players gets a penalty for an inadvertant helmet-to-helmet hit I'm cool with that. But excessive fines (maybe a fine, depends) and suspensions? No, save that for head-stomping and deliberate spearing. The NFL has the intelligence to know which is which. A player can't play up to his potential with only good hard football in his mind worrying about those things. He wasn't trained from day-one to play that way.

Agreed 100%.

I don't know what you were saying with the bold, but instead of the period is should be the word 'and'. Spearing and helmet to helmet hits aren't the same.

This is nitpicking a bit, but spot on. I don't think spearing should be illegal if the player is targeting the body. It's poor form, and poor strategy, but not particularly lethal. Goodell seems to be concerned about spearing to the head, and that is what I was referring to.

NitroGSXR
10-24-2010, 12:22 AM
Earl Campbell was the greatest at spearing. Loved it.

I wish they'd 'roid them all up, do the John Henderson pregame warm up, and then set them loose on the gridiron ala The Steel Curtain. Those guys played some ferocious football.

I like the hits. Guess I'm a sadist. Finesse's in style right now.

Rey
10-24-2010, 12:31 AM
Earl Campbell was the greatest at spearing. Loved it.

I saw quite a few college hits today that I wondered if they would have been flagged or penalized by the NFL...

Quite a bit of helmet to helmet contact...

It will be interesting to watch some games tomorrow to say the least...

b0ng
10-24-2010, 12:39 AM
http://i55.tinypic.com/21odb0w_th.jpg

xreadx
10-24-2010, 12:52 AM
Earl Campbell was the greatest at spearing. Loved it.

I wish they'd 'roid them all up, do the John Henderson pregame warm up, and then set them loose on the gridiron ala The Steel Curtain. Those guys played some ferocious football.

I like the hits. Guess I'm a sadist. Finesse's in style right now.

:handshake:

AND what does this have to do with the texans...? it has everything to do with the texans. when we get flagged for BS tackling and loose a game because of it and not go to the playoffs... im pretty sure we allready had this convo on NFL forum...? i only belong to one forum and this is it.. good job "gtexan02"

Rey
10-24-2010, 12:56 AM
http://i55.tinypic.com/21odb0w_th.jpg

LMAO...

What the hell was that?

Tom Brady looks like a beyotch doin that...

Pantherstang84
10-24-2010, 09:24 AM
LMAO...

What the hell was that?

Tom Brady looks like a beyotch doin that...

Why is anyone surprised by this clip. That is just vintage Tammy Brady.

infantrycak
10-24-2010, 09:54 AM
I don't know what you were saying with the bold, but instead of the period is should be the word 'and'. Spearing and helmet to helmet hits aren't the same.

Spearing serves no purpose what so ever and is just poor technique. It's not any more likely to knock the opposition out of the game than a good legal hit.

The reason spearing is frowned upon is because the person committing the act can paralyze themselves or cause serious spinal or neck injuries. The no spearing rule is actually designed to keep the person committing the foul safe and has very little to do with the person actually getting speared.

That is just total BS. Spearing is illegal because you are using a piece of equipment designed to protect you to injure another player (the helmet in case you had to guess). A side benefit is that it is stupid to do and may injure the tackling player but the rule was put in place to protect the person tackled. Frankly it is ridiculous to argue otherwise.

CloakNNNdagger
10-24-2010, 10:58 AM
The actual action of putting the spearing penalty in was for the purpose of disallowing the helmet to be used as a "throwing weapon" a phrase early on in the initiation of the rule. A maneuver which was felt to deliver maximum "damage" on impact to whatever part of the body it was delivered. If delivered to the opponent's helmet, then this would place the recipient of the hit at significant risk to concussion.

It has since been been noted that there has been an increased number of cervical spinal injuries (not concussions) to players delivering this impact.



http://static.nfl.com/static/content/catch_all/nfl_image/canon_10_wk_4_04.jpg

Rey
10-24-2010, 12:17 PM
That is just total BS. Spearing is illegal because you are using a piece of equipment designed to protect you to injure another player (the helmet in case you had to guess). A side benefit is that it is stupid to do and may injure the tackling player but the rule was put in place to protect the person tackled. Frankly it is ridiculous to argue otherwise.

Negative. You are completely wrong.

Spearing penalties are designed to protect the player committing the foul and it seems that you and others are confused about this.

Does nothing to the player getting speared that a regular hard hit wouldn't do. It doesn't add a whole lot of force to the impact. Doesn't even make sense for a player to purposefully spear an opponent to try and add a little extra force all the while risking paralysis.

The spearing rule is the single
most important rule in football in
terms of consequence(sp aralysis)a nd
yet is probably the least enforced.
One explanation may be officials d..
not understand the importance of the
rule and spearing's relationship tr
catastrophic spine injuries.
Another explanation is the
spearing rule is the only rulc :n
football that penalizes a player for hi;
own protection. The vast majoritv oi
football infractions protect one plaver
from the actions of another (clip, face
mask, etc.). Football adoptcd the
spearing rule to deter and protect th.--
player who spears. Its prima^'
function is not to protect the player
getting speared. It is the onl)'
penalty in football that protects a
player from himself.

http://www.jonheck.com/Articles/analysis.pdf

No one says, "Reggie Brown made the mistake of lowering his head at contact." No one says, "These injuries can be prevented by keeping the head up at contact." Two tragedies surround cervical spine injuries: the tragedy of the injury itself and the tragedy of another missed opportunity for the sports medicine community to educate the masses.
Sports medicine professionals and the media still have not communicated the correct message to football practitioners- coaches, players, officials and administrators. The media is included because of its great influence on practitioners' opinions. It's been more than 20 years since Torg et al. established the relationship between cervical spine injuries, axial loading and head-down contact (8,9,10). And yet the technique remains a common practice in football at every level. Some facts about cervical spine injuries include:
Each time a player makes contact with his head down, he risks fracturing his cervical spine and being paralyzed.
The axial loading mechanism of injury does not discriminate by intent; an unintentional spear can result in paralysis (e.g. Reggie Brown).
A player can spear a member of his own team (e.g. Dennis Byrd).
Spearing risks pertain to tacklers, ball carriers and blockers.
Spearing is most dangerous to the player who spears.
Keeping the head up at contact protects the neck.
Initiating contact with the shoulder while keeping the neck in extension virtually eliminates the risk of paralysis.

2nd link (http://www.google.com/search?ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=navclient&gfns=1&q=NFL+spearing+rules#hl=en&expIds=10701,17259,17284,17287,17310,17315,23628,2 3670,23754,23945,24469,25333,25345,25462,25646,258 34,25980,26328,26637,26761,26849,26992,27021,27095 ,27126,27178,105555,110352,111399,112451,112481,11 4136,114254,114837,115255,115332,115371,115565,115 585,115618,115654&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=spearing+rule+to+protect+the+pla&cp=32&pf=p&sclient=psy&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=spearing+rule+to+protect+the+pla&gs_rfai=&pbx=1&fp=499faa430ac3503f)

"The rule said 'He must intentionally use his helmet to spear,' and we felt like it's hard to find an official to realize whether or not the players intentionally used it or whether he was just making a hit," Southeastern Conference coordinator of officials Bobby Gaston said. "So that will be a rule and a point of emphasis, not only in our conference, but nationally."

The NCAA is providing each school with posters showing what an illegal hit looks like. Courson also put together a video with examples of dangerous hits along with a presentation for athletic trainers to show their players and coaches.

Florida safety Jarvis Herring said the "See What You Hit" sign is in the Gators' locker room.

"The way we practice, we're taught to keep our head up anyway, so it's not a big change," he said. "But we're aware of the new rules. We just don't know how it's going play out in games. Hopefully, it doesn't change much."

Spearing generally brings to mind a tackler lowering his head and planting his helmet into another player's body.

While it may seem that the player on the receiving end of such hits is most vulnerable, the player delivering the blow is in far greater danger, Courson said.

"Our team doctors came and talked to our team about spearing and said how the intent of the rule is really to protect the guy who is spearing," Notre Dame coach Charlie Weis said.

http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=2143847


And here is the best quote about it:

Another factor in calling the spearing
penalty is determining whom the official
is trying to protect. The primary purpose
of the spearing rule is to protect the
athlete who spears.45 The research9"
0'17'20'21'23 that caused this rule
change in 1976 dealt with spearing athletes
who suffered fractured cervical vertebrae.
Although the rule should protect
both players, the player with the most
risk of serious injury is the athlete who
spears. The officials surveyed indicated
that many of them feel they are primarily
attempting to protect the athlete who gets
speared. In my opinion, the wording of
the spearing rule focuses on the athlete
getting speared.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1317831/pdf/jathtrain00021-0065.pdf

Rey
10-24-2010, 12:25 PM
I can post more....Besides actually having played football and having to sign contracts specific to spearing, I have actually read a lot about this rule...

I have many more links I can post...I can go all day about this...But yeah, You are wrong Cak...

powerfuldragon
10-24-2010, 12:35 PM
whoa... wrong thread.

infantrycak
10-24-2010, 01:01 PM
Nice selective bolding. Try this instead:

In my opinion, the wording of
the spearing rule focuses on the athlete
getting speared.

Cite as many things as you want. When does spearing get called? It's typically when a vicious helmet leading late hit is made. It is a criticism of the defensive player not some sort of attaboy good hit but we don't want you to get injured.

Rey
10-24-2010, 01:10 PM
Nice selective bolding. Try this instead:

In my opinion, the wording of
the spearing rule focuses on the athlete
getting speared.

Cite as many things as you want. When does spearing get called? It's typically when a vicious helmet leading late hit is made. It is a criticism of the defensive player not some sort of attaboy good hit but we don't want you to get injured.

I included that for a reason. The wording of the rule is what seems to make you and others think the way you do about the penalty.

The NFL didn't implement the rule until after the NCAA did it (which has been a trend for a long time). The NCAA, the originators of the spearing rule, implemented it because of research done regarding head and neck trauma around 1976.

And if you actually read some of that article I posted you can see some of the reasons for why and how the penalty is called. The article is basically about how the rule has not been properly enforced which you have demonstrated. In the article they even talk about ball carrier spearing and how it is not enforced.

It's designed to protect the player committing the foul (which I think I have adequately demonstrated) so when officials fail to make the call on a regular basis they are failing...When they only call it on big hits, they are failing...

You need to read more about this...there are several articles out there about it and how certain football leagues have failed in this regard.

ziggy29
10-24-2010, 01:43 PM
wrong thread, never mind...

CloakNNNdagger
10-24-2010, 01:50 PM
Most fans mistakenly believe that RBs are immune from the spearing penalty. Evidently, since I can't ever remember seeing it ever called, officials are just as unaware. I'm going to be very interested to see how the officials handle an RB maneuver that routinely occurs.

infantrycak
10-24-2010, 01:53 PM
To be clear I am not saying player safety is not a consideration in the spearing rule but the reason the hankie flies is almost entirely based on the nature of the hit and is a criticism of the defensive player.