PDA

View Full Version : Left Guard..... Right Guard....


thunderkyss
09-17-2010, 05:39 PM
What's the difference?

What makes one guy a better fit at LG than RG, or a better RG, than a LG?

Does it matter what system you're running? Does it dictate what you can & cannot do? Would a poor RG for us make a great LG for someone else?

Not that I believe we should be looking, I'm just curious.

Now that I think about it, I guess this does concern us, being that Wade Smith looks like a starter for us, but he was a back-up in KC.

powerfuldragon
09-17-2010, 05:40 PM
one's a football position. one's deodorant.


don't forget to tip your waiters.

JB
09-17-2010, 05:41 PM
What's the difference?

What makes one guy a better fit at LG than RG, or a better RG, than a LG?

Does it matter what system you're running? Does it dictate what you can & cannot do? Would a poor RG for us make a great LG for someone else?

Not that I believe we should be looking, I'm just curious.

Now that I think about it, I guess this does concern us, being that Wade Smith looks like a starter for us, but he was a back-up in KC.

From what I've heard, they want a stronger RG, and a more athletic LG.


That's all I got

HJam72
09-17-2010, 05:44 PM
One has a bigger right nut and the other has a bigger left net. I'm not sure which. I never look. :)

Rey
09-17-2010, 06:03 PM
LG's tend to be a bit quicker with better feet and RG's tend to be a bit stronger...

CloakNNNdagger
09-17-2010, 07:20 PM
You typically think of both needing to be good run blockers. But the left guard must be very agile to adjust and deal with stunts and the like. More like a left tackle.......must help assure the blindside protection.


This interesting point of view comes from a former lineman ranking the O-line positions. It was a follow to an article saying that guards were getting paid too much. People have disagreed with this but he says right guard is much harder than left.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/200...x.html?eref=T1

3. RIGHT GUARD

Without question the most difficult of the interior line positions, right guards are most likely to be left one-on-one with an elite inside rusher. The predominance of teams to slide their center to the left to protect the quarterback's blind side creates a greater value for the right guard position. Fourteen-year veteran Todd Steussie, currently available on the free agent market, says, "Right guard is definitely harder than left guard." Recently-retired lineman Todd Fordham, a 10-year NFL vet, agreed: "The left guard always has help."

Though the difference in value between the two guard spots is lessened somewhat in an offense that rarely slides the pass protections like the Colts, the strength of the formation often dictates that the right guard has the wider alignment, and thus more difficult assignment, on his side.

4. LEFT GUARD
Because the left guard position is generally less difficult than the right guard position, I have been consistently perplexed the last couple of seasons by the amount of money teams are investing in the position.

Steve Hutchinson, Kris Dielman, Eric Steinbach, Derrick Dockery and Faneca lead the parade of left guards that have received contracts in excess of $40 million. Though I am not sure either guard position is worth that much of the salary cap, I would be much more willing to pay those dollars to a right guard given the greater difficulty in his assignment. I think the Browns got a relative steal by signing right guard Rex Hadnot to a two-year, $7 million deal this offseason.

The greatest reason why left guards are cashing in these days? There are two: 1) The grading system for offensive linemen; and 2) General lack of understanding among some NFL personnel people concerning the difficulty inherent with the different positions.

All of these players are considered upper echelon and likely grade out among the highest linemen on their respective teams. Part of that is because they are good players, but a lot of it has to do with the fact they are much more likely to receive help from the center and thus less likely to create a negative play. The formula is simple: Less one-on-ones against defensive linemen means less chances to give up a sack or pressure. Their consistently high performance given the lower risk at the position tricks many personnel people to assume they are worthy of that money. I disagree. I believe they are all outstanding players but think they would have a tougher time if they played right guard.

There is a reason why most of the interior guys getting paid the big money are left guards and not right guards and the sooner teams can figure it out, the sooner they can begin to allocate more of their money to a position that creates a greater value proposition.

TimeKiller
09-19-2010, 12:01 AM
IMO LG has to be a better pass blocker than RG just not good enough/quick enough to pass block the elite guys as a LT. RG is the guy who can maul block for you but probably sucks at pass blocking which is ok as long as your RT/C can make up for him.