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View Full Version : AJ:New umpire placement could affect Texans offense too


Wolf
09-04-2010, 12:04 PM
The new field placement of NFL umpires claimed its first victim last night and not surprisingly it was the Colts that were victimized.

If you're not familiar with the new placement, NFL umpires now line up 12 yards deep in the offensive backfield with the referee. Umpires used to camp out 5-7 yards deep on the defensive side, in the neighborhood of the middle linebacker.

The old placement was the reason for the rule change. Too many umpires were getting caught up in traffic and being injured by ball carriers, blockers and tacklers.

Umpires were also often used as a 'pick' for teams that like to run shallow crossing routes with their tight ends and slot receivers. Like Indy - and Houston.

Judy Battista of the New York Times wrote this article about a week ago which outlines the key points of the move and what effects it will have on the game.

The officials set up outside the view of those watching on television but it will be readily apparent to those of us in the stands tomorrow night so that's something else to look for.

What's funny is I had run across Battista's article last week and had intended to write about this then, but other things took priority.



I asked the official what the challenges are with this new placement and if there certain types of calls that will be harder to pick up - or maybe easier.

"The mechanics and officiating keys are a little different but not completely," the official said. "Any change presents new challenges but so far in the preseason it is working fine."

But that was before last night's game between the Colts and Packers where Peyton Manning tried to quick snap. But the umpire - who now has to spot the ball and backpedal 12 yards to get into position before every snap - wasn't set when the Colts snapped the ball.

Result? 5-yard false start in the redzone, and a pissed off Peyton Manning. Poor baby. We'll see if the Colts whine to the league and try to get something changed before Week 1. I can't see how the league would make a change this late but you never know when it involves Mr. Golden Boy.

How could this affect the Texans, you ask?

Well it won't have any effect on quick snaps because that's not the Texans game, but the Texans run some of the same tight end and slot receiver crosses that Bill Walsh's teams used to run back in the day.

And yes, even your lily white, squeaky clean All American Texans have using the umpire as a pick from time to time.


http://www.examiner.com/houston-texans-in-houston/new-umpire-placement-could-affect-texans-offense-too

CloakNNNdagger
09-04-2010, 12:23 PM
http://www.examiner.com/houston-texans-in-houston/new-umpire-placement-could-affect-texans-offense-too

HWWNBN would have probably used the umpire to hide behind.:tiphat:

ledzeppelin229
09-04-2010, 01:16 PM
HWWNBN would have probably used the umpire to hide behind.:tiphat:

I still remember "him" pegging the ump in the forehead with a laser across the middle. Might have been the first game.

Carr Bombed
09-04-2010, 01:43 PM
I don't see this effecting the Texans at all...

Owen Daniels if healthy can beat LBers (and if he can't we have TEs who can)and just about all of Houston's receivers (TEs and WRs) can make catches with players draped all over them...in Andre's case, he can still make the catch and run up field with players draped all over him :)

As far as Graham getting called for a pick.......well, Houston's receivers have been called for a pick even before the new rule change. Anybody remember that game changing call that went against KW in the Jags game awhile back?

HJam72
09-04-2010, 01:45 PM
yes, but they're used to having a referee draped on them too.

Carr Bombed
09-04-2010, 01:48 PM
yep

DocBar
09-04-2010, 01:48 PM
I think the new placement will be good for the game. How many times have we seen a defender rubbed off on a the ump or some other unintentional, and at times, game-changing interference? Besides, these are usually old guys with no preotection at all from some pretty large men with a full head of steam. Anything that pisses Manning off is pretty OK in my book.

Carr Bombed
09-04-2010, 01:50 PM
Also the Colts aren't worried about not having "the pick".....that's not why they're bitching about the rule.

It's their no huddle offense that they're trying to protect. That's a much bigger blow to their offense.

RagingBull
09-04-2010, 01:58 PM
If this rule had been in place last year, we would have not gotten burned after the infamous Dunta Robinson tackle celebration when Manning quick-snapped it and threw the long ball.

CloakNNNdagger
09-04-2010, 01:59 PM
Also the Colts aren't worried about not having "the pick".....that's not why they're bitching about the rule.

It's their no huddle offense that they're trying to protect. That's a much bigger blow to their offense.

I expect to see Manning out there with a cattle prod.:kitten:

eriadoc
09-04-2010, 02:15 PM
I'm perfectly OK with teams using umps as a pick. When the umps get in the way of the Texans, they don't nullify the play, so hey, if you can get in our way, then we can make you get in the way of the other guys. All's fair in love and war. If you don't like it, move (which they have, so it's all good).

As for the quick snap, that's BS, IMO. And I know they're reverting back to their normal spot on the field after a certain time on the clock, so then you can quick snap - or use them as a pick. ;)

ArlingtonTexan
09-04-2010, 02:47 PM
Also the Colts aren't worried about not having "the pick".....that's not why they're bitching about the rule.

It's their no huddle offense that they're trying to protect. That's a much bigger blow to their offense.

They rarely snap the ball quickly, normally going through Manning over the top motioning and signaling. Do the handful of times a game that they really snap early in the count matter? Of course, because threat of the quick snap is as important as the quick snap , but the pre-season game very conscious attempt to highlight the rule versus run the offense at the normal pace.

Wolf
09-04-2010, 02:55 PM
But that was before last night's game between the Colts and Packers where Peyton Manning tried to quick snap. But the umpire - who now has to spot the ball and backpedal 12 yards to get into position before every snap - wasn't set when the Colts snapped the ball.



I love this rule, it gives me time to celebrate a hit

signed,
D-Rob

:runaway:

ChampionTexan
09-04-2010, 02:58 PM
They rarely snap the ball quickly, normally going through Manning over the top motioning and signaling. Do the handful of times a game that they really snap early in the count matter? Of course, because threat of the quick snap is as important as the quick snap , but the pre-season game very conscious attempt to highlight the rule versus run the offense at the normal pace.

Agreed.

I think they (The Colts) would tell you that while they rarely snap the ball quickly, the possibility that they could inhibits or prevents the defensive team from making situational substitutions. The extra time provided before even the possibility of a snap could change that.

Corrosion
09-06-2010, 05:29 AM
I think the biggest issue with this is in the two minute drill when teams need to line up quickly and stop the clock .... having to wait on the officials to get in position 12 yards away could cost a team valuable seconds - and potentially change the outcome of a game.

CloakNNNdagger
09-06-2010, 07:57 AM
I think the biggest issue with this is in the two minute drill when teams need to line up quickly and stop the clock .... having to wait on the officials to get in position 12 yards away could cost a team valuable seconds - and potentially change the outcome of a game.

The rule will not apply to the last 2 minutes of each half. The umps in those 2periods of time will revert to their traditional spot so as not to interfere with the offenses' rhythm in a typical two-minute drill.

Indy Skinnz
09-06-2010, 08:26 AM
If this rule had been in place last year, we would have not gotten burned after the infamous Dunta Robinson tackle celebration when Manning quick-snapped it and threw the long ball.

So a rule that allows the defense to overcome its own ignorance is a good one?

I think the whole umpire placement is a bunch of nonsense. When the games start for real, teams will learn how to adjust and be just as successful running their offense as they used to.

As for Indy, the Colts no huddle is not necessarily a quick offense so I don't think it will be as big of factor as some are making it out to be.

Indy Skinnz
09-06-2010, 08:27 AM
They rarely snap the ball quickly, normally going through Manning over the top motioning and signaling. Do the handful of times a game that they really snap early in the count matter? Of course, because threat of the quick snap is as important as the quick snap , but the pre-season game very conscious attempt to highlight the rule versus run the offense at the normal pace.

Absolutely 100% correct.

Corrosion
09-06-2010, 09:09 AM
The rule will not apply to the last 2 minutes of each half. The umps in those 2periods of time will revert to their traditional spot so as not to interfere with the offenses' rhythm in a typical two-minute drill.

Thanks for clarifying that ....

Wolf
09-06-2010, 04:52 PM
A meeting of the referees and umpires will be held Friday, one day after the season opener between Minnesota and New Orleans. That meeting will "simply be to review the mechanics of the umpire position," NFL spokesman Michael Signora said Monday.

In March, the league decided for safety reasons to move umpires from the middle of the defense near the linebackers to behind the deepest running back. But Colts quarterback and four-time NFL MVP Peyton Manning complained in a preseason game at Green Bay after he twice was called for illegal snaps when the umpire couldn't get into position quickly enough.



But the solution already has drawn protests from some players, particularly those on fast-tempo offenses.

"If we do the mechanics right, I don't think that it (penalties) ought to be an issue," Polian said. "If I thought that would be a byproduct of it, obviously, I would not have voted for it. There are certain times of the game and certain downs and distance where it's going to become more of an issue, and they've got to be aware of it.


http://www.ctpost.com/sports/article/NFL-reviewing-positioning-of-umpires-647075.php

Pantherstang84
09-06-2010, 09:11 PM
I smell a "Manning Rule" coming.

Norg
09-06-2010, 11:01 PM
remember when Moats fumbled and we kinda took our time with the next play yeah i dont think it will effect us no more then anyother team tho i agree i hate the new rule

Just throw some pads and a helmet on the reff and man up

J_R
09-07-2010, 10:25 AM
Jason La Canfora (www.twitter.com/JasonLaCanfora)



NFL issues memo to all teams this AM detailing changes made to where the umpire will be stationed in the regular season. Details to follow

1. Umpires will be lined up no more than 12 yards from the LOS. At the beginning of the preseason, they were approximately 15 yards back

2. Umpire must be beyond the deepest offensive player before ball snapped. Before, ball not snapped until umpire had assumed his position.

3. A line of scrimmage official will signal when legal snap permitted. The original procedure required QB to check with the ref.

4. Umpires will assume a position on the D side of the ball after 2-min warning of the 2nd qtr and inside 5 mins remaining in 4th qtr

5. Umpires will assume a position on the defensive side of the ball when the offense is at or inside the defensive five-yard line.

6. The ref has authority to warn offense for an illegal snap for future action. But a clear violation can be called without warning.

Refs and ump will meet on Friday in Dallas to review the preseason and the mechanics of the umpire position. Hope is streamlined process . Will avoid some of the problems caused to no huddle teams (i.e.Colts) who had issues with the ump change in preseason. More on NFL.com

TheCD
09-07-2010, 10:55 AM
Jason La Canfora (www.twitter.com/JasonLaCanfora)
5. Umpires will assume a position on the defensive side of the ball when the offense is at or inside the defensive five-yard line.


Huh? Wouldn't they be more prone to getting the crap knocked out of them in that limited space?

I think they need to just pick one way of doing things and stick to it. I don't care what they pick, just go with something and do it consistently.

CloakNNNdagger
09-08-2010, 08:11 AM
More modifications to positioning of umpire (http://views.washingtonpost.com/theleague/nflnewsfeed/2010/09/more-modifications-to-positioning-of-umpire.html)

The NFL continues to tweak the officiating procedures related to the positioning of the umpire.

In a memo sent to NFL teams, Carl Johnson, the league's vice president of officiating, said the umpire will be positioned on the defensive side of the ball on plays beginning at or inside the 5-yard line of the defensive team. It's useful to have the umpire on the defensive side of the ball on such potential scoring plays, according to the league.

Johnson also wrote in the memo that the referee has the leeway to merely issue a warning to the offensive team, rather than immediately assess a penalty, for an illegal snap taken before the umpire is in proper position. A penalty still can be called without a warning if there is a clear violation, according to the memo.

The positioning of the umpire has generated some controversy since the league decided in the offseason to move the umpire from the defensive side of the ball, a few yards behind the line of scrimmage, to the offensive backfield, behind the quarterback and running backs, for safety reasons.

Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning was critical after the Colts were penalized for two illegal snaps while using their no-huddle offense during a preseason game. The league has continued to make adjustments. It modified the positioning procedures for the umpire before the final set of preseason games last Thursday.

Referees and umpires are scheduled to meet Friday in Dallas to review the mechanics of the issue. The referee and umpire for Thursday night's season-opening game between the New Orleans Saints and Minnesota Vikings will hold a similar review conducted by conference call before the game.

The umpire now is positioned on the defensive side of the ball in the final two minutes of the first half and the final five minutes of the game. That was changed during the preseason. Originally, the umpire was on the defensive side for the final two minutes of each half.

Umpires are to line up no more than 12 yards from the line of scrimmage, three yards closer than originally prescribed. The ball can be snapped when the umpire is behind the offensive player who is farthest from the line of scrimmage, a change from the original procedure that the ball could not be snapped until the umpire was in his official position. The quarterback can receive a signal from the head linesman or line judge, officials who are at the line of scrimmage, when the ball can be snapped legally, instead of having to turn around to check with the referee for such a signal.

A punter lines up about 15 yds behind the center.............the rule can't possibly work. Are they going to force the punter to punt from 11 1/2 yds........so we see blocked punts in 50 % of the snaps and a soaring rate of punter injuries?

I'm not sure that, beyond Manning acting as the head consultant to establishing modifications, these rules have been thought out prior to implimentation. My suggestion is that if the NFL intends any rule changes, they confer with Manning PRIOR to their implimentation. I'm sure glad that Manning caught the fact that it would be much fairer for him to be "warned" rather than actually penalized. I guess the arbitrary choice for warning vs penalty is just as fair the system of traffic tickets going to the short, ugly, bald fat guy, while the gorgeous, slim, blond-haired diva gets away with a warning. I won't be surpised to see Manning, including in his presnap choreography, hiking up his knickers to show more leg to the umpire prior to his snap.....wink, wink.