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Dutchrudder
07-16-2010, 04:45 PM
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- The NFL has suspended Green Bay Packers defensive tackle Johnny Jolly without pay for the upcoming season and perhaps beyond for violating the league's substance abuse policy.

The league says Jolly's suspension begins immediately and will continue through at least the 2010 season. He will be eligible to apply for reinstatement after the Super Bowl.

Jolly is facing drug charges in Houston after his July 2008 arrest outside a club allegedly for illegally possessing at least 200 grams of codeine. If convicted, Jolly faces up to 20 years in prison.

Well, I guess I can't make fun of Longhorns and their drug problems anymore...

One less Aggie in the NFL :(

Good thing the Packers drafted BJ Raji last year.

JB
07-16-2010, 04:51 PM
That's a pretty big blow, but I think the Pack saw it coming...

CloakNNNdagger
07-16-2010, 05:15 PM
Looks like it's an "indefinite" suspension.

Jolly's suspension is for substance abuse (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/07/16/jollys-suspension-is-for-substance-abuse/)


When news of Packers defensive end Johnny Jolly's indefinite suspension broke Friday, we assumed the ban was related to Jolly's pending drug trial. Jolly is accused of numerous offenses that essentially paint him as a drug kingpin in the Houston area. So it seemed likely that Jolly had violated the NFL's Personal Conduct Policy.


NFL Network's Jason La Canfora, however, reports that Jolly was suspended not for a conduct code violation, but for breaking the league's rules against substance abuse. La Canfora's report leaves the door open for Jolly's suspension to stem from something unrelated to his court case. Like one or more failed drug tests.


Therefore, the indefinite ban figures to be continued beyond this season if, in addition to violating the NFL's Substance Abuse Policy, Jolly is convicted of what Texas prosecutors have alleged and is thus found to be in violation of the Personal Conduct Policy.


La Canfora wondered aloud on Twitter whether "this is the end for Jolly in the NFL."


ESPN's Michael Smith reported Friday afternoon on NFL Live that Jolly will have the opportunity to appeal his suspension following Super Bowl XLV.

Hagar
07-16-2010, 06:23 PM
So Jolly, a starting Packer, gets busted with purple drank 2 years ago with little to no media coverage and the league does nothing. Now an out of work player (Russell) gets busted with it and the media has a field day; which leads to Jolly's suspension. For some reason, the scales of justice don't seem quite level to me.

I'm not saying what Jolly did was right, but what the league didn't do is wrong too.

ChampionTexan
07-16-2010, 06:28 PM
So Jolly, a starting Packer, gets busted with purple drank 2 years ago with little to no media coverage and the league does nothing. Now an out of work player (Russell) gets busted with it and the media has a field day; which leads to Jolly's suspension. For some reason, the scales of justice don't seem quite level to me.

I'm not saying what Jolly did was right, but what the league didn't do is wrong too.

When you say "what the league didn't do", what are you referring to?

JB
07-16-2010, 06:28 PM
So Jolly, a starting Packer, gets busted with purple drank 2 years ago with little to no media coverage and the league does nothing. Now an out of work player (Russell) gets busted with it and the media has a field day; which leads to Jolly's suspension. For some reason, the scales of justice don't seem quite level to me.

I'm not saying what Jolly did was right, but what the league didn't do is wrong too.

Why are you saying the Russell suspension led to the Jolly suspension?

ChampionTexan
07-16-2010, 06:32 PM
Why are you saying the Russell suspension led to the Jolly suspension?

To the best of my knowledge, there is no Russell suspension (at least not yet).

JB
07-16-2010, 06:38 PM
To the best of my knowledge, there is no Russell suspension (at least not yet).

Sorry, I meant Russell arrest and media coverage.

steelbtexan
07-16-2010, 11:27 PM
Jolly

I hope that purple drank was good.

It sure will make your wallet lean.

brakos82
07-16-2010, 11:29 PM
Jolly

I hope that purple drank was good.

It sure will make your wallet lean.

:facepalm: I see what you did there....

infantrycak
07-17-2010, 10:41 AM
To the best of my knowledge, there is no Russell suspension (at least not yet).

Tough to be suspended from a league you aren't part of.

ChampionTexan
07-17-2010, 11:00 AM
Tough to be suspended from a league you aren't part of.

Tell that to Lendale White.

infantrycak
07-17-2010, 11:06 AM
Tell that to Lendale White.

What you talkin' 'bout Willis?

Edit - OK I get it but White tested positive while with a team. Russell didn't fail a league test. He was arrested while not employed by the league.

ChampionTexan
07-17-2010, 12:14 PM
What you talkin' 'bout Willis?

Edit - OK I get it but White tested positive while with a team. Russell didn't fail a league test. He was arrested while not employed by the league.

He's not employed by a team, but he is still considered an active league player.

Dutchrudder
07-17-2010, 01:03 PM
He's not employed by a team, but he is still considered an active league player.

His rights are now owned by the Omaha UFL team. So if anything, he will sign with them, but after the codeine incident he may not even get a contract from them.

Linky (http://blogs.nfl.com/2010/07/16/russell-listed-on-ufl-teams-provisional-roster/)

ChampionTexan
07-17-2010, 02:08 PM
His rights are now owned by the Omaha UFL team. So if anything, he will sign with them, but after the codeine incident he may not even get a contract from them.

Linky (http://blogs.nfl.com/2010/07/16/russell-listed-on-ufl-teams-provisional-roster/)

That's correct, and it's got nothing to do with his NFL status, unless and until Jamarcus Russell and the Omaha UFL team mutually agree otherwise.

Hagar
07-18-2010, 02:21 AM
When you say "what the league didn't do", what are you referring to?

The league has made it clear to everybody that the law of the state isn't league law. Basically, whether or not you are found guilty of an action by the state, the mere insinuation of an action that that violates the leagues moral conduct code or drug rules can get you suspended immediately. Jolly sat around for two years because the league didn't want to admit that many of its players were performing a new illegal act that the public didn't for the most part know about.

Now that the media has plastered the illegality of Purple Drank all over newspapers, ESPN and talk radio, the league makes an example of Jolly who should have been dealt with 2 years ago.

CloakNNNdagger
07-18-2010, 08:43 AM
There is definite need for having and enforcing a personal conduct policy. But there also should be consistency of application. The policy has evolved but the enforcement has been all over the place.


Roger Goodell scares the hell out of me.

And it wasn't always this way. When Goodell as NFL commissioner unveiled his personal conduct policy in 2007, it was new, needed, even noble. The policy read, and I quote, "It will be considered conduct detrimental [for league personnel] to engage in ... violent and/or criminal activity." The policy went on to describe the line in the sand that could not be crossed, and that line was this: an arrest or a legal charge. A player didn't have to be convicted of a crime to be suspended; he had to be "arrested or charged," a phrase that appeared three times in the conduct policy.

And I loved it. The court system can take forever, and legal finagling often reduces charges to unrecognizable, even negligible levels. For example, domestic battery is often reduced to disturbing the peace, and a DUI arrest can be pleaded down to reckless driving. Goodell can't suspend a guy for disturbing the peace or for reckless friggin' driving, so he goes after the original charge. And we should understand. Tank Johnson and Pacman Jones were charged with all sorts of heinous crimes, and Goodell hammered them. Before all the lawyer wrangling, there was plenty of legal smoke, so Goodell brought the fire. Good for him, and good for his cynical but smart line in the sand.

But in recent weeks, Goodell has moved that line. Where did he move it? He moved it toward Salem, Mass. He moved it somewhere scary:

It's no longer necessary that there be enough evidence of "violent and/or criminal activity" for police to make an arrest or file charges. Nope. Now, an accusation is enough.

Goodell's new line in the sand was outlined in a memo leaked last week, a memo that reads, and I quote: "Every investigation, arrest, or other allegation of improper conduct ... threatens the continued success of our brand."

See that? An arrest is no longer needed. Forget about a conviction. Now, an "allegation" will do.

Link (http://www.cbssports.com/columns/story/13243927/goodells-conduct-policy-veering-from-mostly-right-to-all-wrong)

CloakNNNdagger
03-25-2011, 05:20 PM
Johnny Jolly Charged With Possession Again (http://houston.cbslocal.com/2011/03/25/johnny-jolly-charged-with-possession-again/)

By ANNA-MEGAN RALEY and GAVIN SPITTLE


Trouble brews for Houston native Johnny Jolly once again. The defensive end, who was suspended from the Green Bay Packers for felony drug charges in 2008, was arrested in Houston early Friday morning.

Houston police stopped Jollyís Cadillac Escalade for a traffic violation at 12:45 a.m. on the 9900 block of Westpark. Jolly presented a state identification card rather than a driverís license, and police learned that his license is suspended and is not eligible for renewal.

While searching the vehicle, police discovered that Jolly was in possession of 600 grams of Codeine, which is a felony charge. Police also discovered another unidentified substance, which has been sent in for testing.At this time, it is unknown if the amount of controlled substances found in Jollyís vehicle could be heavy enough to be considered for charges of possession with intent to distribute.

Jolly, a three-time all-district defensive lineman at Forest Brook High School in Houston, attended Texas A&M and became a starting defensive tackle. The Packers selected Jolly in the sixth round of the 2006 NFL Draft.

Johnny Jolly: "You've got it all wrong. That's my favorite paper weight!"

brakos82
03-25-2011, 06:28 PM
:kubepalm:

CloakNNNdagger
03-25-2011, 06:55 PM
:kubepalm:

To put the 600 grams of cocaine in perspective.................454 grams=1 pound.

Doppelganger
03-25-2011, 09:53 PM
To put the 600 grams of cocaine in perspective.................454 grams=1 pound.

Yeah, it was roughly 1.3 lbs of cocaine. THAT'S scary.

Another way to put it in perspective is to think about the sliced turkey roll in the bags in your local grocery store. They are usually sold in 1lb bags. So imagine taking all the turkey out, filling an entire bag of cocaine and then another one a third of the way.

Now here is the really scary thing: if a gram costs $40, this guy had $24,000 worth of cocaine on him.

Hmm. Wow!

drs23
03-25-2011, 10:03 PM
Quote:
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- The NFL has suspended Green Bay Packers defensive tackle Johnny Jolly without pay for the upcoming season and perhaps beyond for violating the league's substance abuse policy.

The league says Jolly's suspension begins immediately and will continue through at least the 2010 season. He will be eligible to apply for reinstatement after the Super Bowl.

Jolly is facing drug charges in Houston after his July 2008 arrest outside a club allegedly for illegally possessing at least 200 grams of codeine. If convicted, Jolly faces up to 20 years in prison.



Well, I guess I can't make fun of Longhorns and their drug problems anymore...

One less Aggie in the NFL :(

Good thing the Packers drafted BJ Raji last year.

I thought it was ^^^^^ idonno:

Doppelganger
03-26-2011, 08:29 AM
I thought it was ^^^^^ idonno:

The 200 grams of codene was in 2010.

Yesterday he was arrested for 600 grams of cocaine.

IBleedTexans
03-26-2011, 09:21 AM
Yeah, it was roughly 1.3 lbs of cocaine. THAT'S scary.

Another way to put it in perspective is to think about the sliced turkey roll in the bags in your local grocery store. They are usually sold in 1lb bags. So imagine taking all the turkey out, filling an entire bag of cocaine and then another one a third of the way.

Now here is the really scary thing: if a gram costs $40, this guy had $24,000 worth of cocaine on him.

Hmm. Wow!

Yea but your thinking if he was to sell it gram by gram.17k to 24k is about what a kilo goes for depending on where you get it .For a guy that was making millions I'm suprised he only got caught with a lil more than half a key .

Dan B.
03-26-2011, 10:32 AM
The 200 grams of codene was in 2010.

Yesterday he was arrested for 600 grams of cocaine.

They were both for codeine:

While searching the vehicle, police discovered that Jolly was in possession of 600 grams of Codeine, which is a felony charge. Police also discovered another unidentified substance, which has been sent in for testing.

CloakNNNdagger
03-26-2011, 10:47 AM
They were both for codeine:

Yes, thanks for the correction of my mistype. My bad. The 454 gms/ pound "perspective" remains the same.

Dan B.
03-26-2011, 10:54 AM
Yes, thanks for the correction of my mistype. My bad. The 454 gms/ pound "perspective" remains the same.

No doubt. That's a lot of drank, especially considering that the stuff is diluted when they drink it anyway. .

drs23
03-27-2011, 10:51 AM
They were both for codeine:

Thank you. That's what I read/saw.:worldpeace:

disaacks3
03-27-2011, 11:38 AM
Damn, I could use some of that right now...(recovering from Kidney surgery)

TEXANRED
03-28-2011, 12:35 AM
Yea but your thinking if he was to sell it gram by gram.17k to 24k is about what a kilo goes for depending on where you get it .For a guy that was making millions I'm suprised he only got caught with a lil more than half a key .

Why do you know this?

HOU-TEX
03-28-2011, 10:09 AM
I haven't read through the whole thread, but when I heard about this the other day all I could do is shake my head. Maybe it's just me, but I just can't figure out how a person could make such idiotic decisions in 1 life.

With Jenkins likely leaving in FA, this dipshit was a shoe-in for a starting job again after reinstatement. smfh

Thorn
03-28-2011, 01:47 PM
Codeine? Maybe he just has a cough. :turtle:

IBleedTexans
03-28-2011, 01:52 PM
Why do you know this?

Because knowledge is power my good friend.I like to think I'm both street and book smart.

BullNation4Life
03-28-2011, 02:08 PM
Because knowledge is power my good friend.I like to think I'm both street and book smart.

Sorry but nothing smart about knowing how much drugs go for on the street...

unless you are a dealer and then you are just plain stupid....

gtexan02
03-28-2011, 02:51 PM
Sorry but nothing smart about knowing how much drugs go for on the street...

unless you are a dealer and then you are just plain stupid....

Why do you say that? Having knowledge about things, even if they are illicit, is never a bad thing.

Dan B.
03-28-2011, 03:02 PM
Sorry but nothing smart about knowing how much drugs go for on the street...

unless you are a dealer and then you are just plain stupid....

Why do you say that? Having knowledge about things, even if they are illicit, is never a bad thing.

Not to mention you can figure out what the street value of drugs are from watching Law & Order. It's a bit of a leap to think that knowing that is suspicious.

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRWV9wa4PpEh5WCkaZP2-rnXJ_dW3I7pyhlc0RQoYxuthg0AK5w

Dutchrudder
03-28-2011, 03:10 PM
Not to mention you can figure out what the street value of drugs are from watching Law & Order. It's a bit of a leap to think that knowing that is suspicious.

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRWV9wa4PpEh5WCkaZP2-rnXJ_dW3I7pyhlc0RQoYxuthg0AK5w

I like how half those squares aren't even conclusions. Your mat is mis-labeled.

IBleedTexans
03-28-2011, 08:04 PM
Sorry but nothing smart about knowing how much drugs go for on the street...

unless you are a dealer and then you are just plain stupid....

I don't understand how you can say having more knowledge is not smart. If I was an undercover cop, that could help me with a case. Just because you can't think outside the box doesnt mean other people can't . Sorry sr but I would define that as ignorance.Good day

BullNation4Life
03-30-2011, 02:27 PM
I don't understand how you can say having more knowledge is not smart. If I was an undercover cop, that could help me with a case. Just because you can't think outside the box doesnt mean other people can't . Sorry sr but I would define that as ignorance.Good day

That isn't having more knowledge, especially in today's youth. Got kids that can't spell, can't do math, can barely read but know how much a kilo is on the street? WOW! Explain to me how that knowledge, other than being a cop, is going to in anyway benefit anybody in the growth of a young one's mind.


That is ignorance personified.....