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Yankee_In_TX
11-06-2009, 01:18 PM
Stupid question, why does our depth chart list nose tackle?

I alway thought that was thie middle in a 3-4.

Is Nose considered one side and defensive the other?

cuppacoffee
11-06-2009, 01:28 PM
Stupid question, why does our depth chart list nose tackle?

I alway thought that was thie middle in a 3-4.

Is Nose considered one side and defensive the other?


I've wondered the same thing. Glad you asked.


:coffee:

m5kwatts
11-06-2009, 01:37 PM
The nose tackle in a 4-3 is the left defensive tackle

Yankee_In_TX
11-06-2009, 01:40 PM
The nose tackle in a 4-3 is the left defensive tackle

Rep. I learned something new today.

BattleRedToro
11-06-2009, 01:54 PM
The nose tackle in a 4-3 is the left defensive tackle

This isn't 100% correct. The correct definition is that a Defensive Tackle is said to be aligned in the Nose Tackle position when he is lined up directly over or slightly shaded over the opposing Center. It has nothing to do with whether he is to the right or left of the Center and it doesn't matter if there are 3, 4, 5 or more down lineman. The definition is the same.

Blake
11-06-2009, 02:11 PM
Stupid question, why does our depth chart list nose tackle?

I alway thought that was thie middle in a 3-4.

Is Nose considered one side and defensive the other?


Nose tackle (NT) is a defensive alignment position for a defensive lineman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defensive_lineman) in American and Canadian football. The nose tackle aligns across the line of scrimmage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_of_scrimmage) from the offense's center before the play begins.

In a traditional 4-3 defensive set (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4-3_defensive_set), the term "nose tackle" could be (but is not usually) used to describe one of the two defensive tackles, usually on the weak side of the offensive line. His job is to take up the center and weak-side or pulling guard so that the smaller 'rush' end has a 1-on-1 matchup with the offense's blindside tackle. The second defensive tackle sometimes referred to as an 'under tackle', takes up the strongside guard and the strongside end takes up the strongside offensive tackle. More modern, cover 2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cover_2) schemes include either four smaller, athletic linemen, like Tony Dungy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Dungy)'s scheme, developed in Tampa Bay; or two small, athletic ends and two nose tackles, like the scheme used by the Baltimore Ravens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Ravens) during their 2000 championship season (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000_Baltimore_Ravens_season). The example of some players playing in this position in this scheme is Gilbert Brown (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Brown) who won Super Bowl XXXI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Bowl_XXXI) with the Green Bay Packers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Bay_Packers) and Ted Washington (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Washington).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nose_tackle

Texan_Bill
11-06-2009, 02:15 PM
Nose tackle (NT) is a defensive alignment position for a defensive lineman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defensive_lineman) in American and Canadian football. The nose tackle aligns across the line of scrimmage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_of_scrimmage) from the offense's center before the play begins.

In a traditional 4-3 defensive set (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4-3_defensive_set), the term "nose tackle" could be (but is not usually) used to describe one of the two defensive tackles, usually on the weak side of the offensive line. His job is to take up the center and weak-side or pulling guard so that the smaller 'rush' end has a 1-on-1 matchup with the offense's blindside tackle. The second defensive tackle sometimes referred to as an 'under tackle', takes up the strongside guard and the strongside end takes up the strongside offensive tackle. More modern, cover 2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cover_2) schemes include either four smaller, athletic linemen, like Tony Dungy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Dungy)'s scheme, developed in Tampa Bay; or two small, athletic ends and two nose tackles, like the scheme used by the Baltimore Ravens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Ravens) during their 2000 championship season (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000_Baltimore_Ravens_season). The example of some players playing in this position in this scheme is Gilbert Brown (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Brown) who won Super Bowl XXXI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Bowl_XXXI) with the Green Bay Packers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Bay_Packers) and Ted Washington (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Washington).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nose_tackle

Correctamundo!!!!

m5kwatts
11-06-2009, 03:44 PM
Conventionally speaking the left side of any defense is the strong side best suited for the run stopping personnel. The right side is the weak side best suited for your speed/pass defense personnel. So in terms of a 4-3, the two down lineman on the left are your strong run stoppers, the two down lineman on the right are your speed pass rushers, they're on the right side because they're attacking the QB's blind side. So if the NT is your tie-up-blockers run stopping guy, by this thinking you'd line your NT in a 4-3 on the left side, therefore freeing up the right side of the line, your speed pass rushers, to attack the QB's blind side.

Whoever you ask is gonna give you a different variation of this basic concept. There really isn't a right or wrong answer here.

dsorc
11-06-2009, 04:20 PM
Whether the NT lines up on the left or right depends on the type of 4-3 front and even if you're playing one or two-gap technique. The main two variations are the 4-3 Over and 4-3 Under usually one-gap. In the Over, which is the most common look, the pass rushing tackle ('Under Tackle') lines up between the OT and OG (3 technique) on the strong side (usually left) while the run stopping tackle ('Nose Tackle') lines up over the gap in between the C and OG (1 technique) on the weakside. The 4-3 under has the tackles flipped, UT on the weakside and NT on the strongside. Each alignment has ramifications in terms of the responsibilities of the LBs since inevitably there is one gap on each side without a DL on it.

The big difference between a 2-gap NT (typical of the 3-4) and a 1-gap NT (typical of the 4-3) is that the 2-gap NT essentially takes on 3 OL in the run game. On an inside run he has less help at the POA because the line is more spread out. This is why a 3-4 needs a great NT to be able to stop the run.