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View Full Version : Some positive words about the Texans from SI


gg no re
09-15-2009, 11:59 PM
With all due respect to Cougars quarterback Case Keenum, an elite college team should only lose to one team from Houston: the Texans.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/andy_staples/09/15/week3-1/index.html?eref=sihpT1

Gotta take what we can get :bender:

Vinny
09-16-2009, 12:08 AM
that's called a backhanded compliment

Buffi2
09-16-2009, 12:12 AM
Actually, I do believe it is a slap in the face.

GP
09-16-2009, 12:20 AM
Wow.

We're now THAT team.

How did I ever fall for it? I mean, I'm that guy who sees an oasis in the desert and starts running for it with all my might...only to dive into the ground and start gulping the dry grains of sand.

I've got those "Bad NFL Team Blues."

I need a good Nicholas Cage movie to get me out of this funk. I'm thinking Captain Corelli's Mandolin or Kiss Of Death. Actually, Kiss Of Death would be better because it's a double dipper: Nick Cage AND David Caruso.

Now all I need is one of those microwavable NightHawk salisbury steak dinners, and some heroin. And then it's back onto the road of recovery for this gentleman! (sounds of weeping)...

GP
09-16-2009, 07:38 AM
Actually, I do believe it is a slap in the face.

I would actually take a slap in the face at this point.

Instead of getting slapped in the groin every Sunday at 12:00 p.m. Central Time.

MannyFresh
09-16-2009, 07:50 AM
Listened to Mike & Mike this morning....Chris Mortensen thinks its worry time for the Cardinals, Panthers, and Texans....his segment was brief, but he talked about the Texans problems they had all summer. Look for a change if it doesn't get better.

Mr. White
09-16-2009, 08:25 AM
So since Kubiak's been here......

Not only have we been passed up by Sean Payton, Mike Smith and Tony Sparano....

We've been passed up by Kevin Sumlin.

Texan_Bill
09-16-2009, 08:42 AM
I took it as a reference to the Coogs losing to Rice last season and how an elite college team wouldn't do that although an elite college team would lose to an NFL team. That's not a slap in the face to the Texans, but a shot at UH.

JB
09-16-2009, 09:23 AM
I took it as a reference to the Coogs losing to Rice last season and how an elite college team wouldn't do that although an elite college team would lose to an NFL team. That's not a slap in the face to the Texans, but a shot at UH.

I believe it was a shot at OSU for losing to UH

FR0497
09-16-2009, 10:24 AM
I believe it was a shot at OSU for losing to UH

This.

GP
09-16-2009, 06:02 PM
I'm so confused. Who the hell is supposed to be the recipient of the supposed slap-in-the-face comments from that news story?

So many theories.

I NEED CLOSURE!!!

Texan_Bill
09-16-2009, 06:11 PM
I believe it was a shot at OSU for losing to UH

This.


Upon a full read, y'all are correct.

Big Lou
09-16-2009, 06:17 PM
I believe it was a shot at OSU for losing to UH

Ding, ding, ding!!!!!!


I think everyone is hyper sensetive right now, considering the event that took place sunday which we will not speak of.

mexican_texan
09-17-2009, 12:14 AM
More like a slap at Rice.

ObsiWan
09-17-2009, 02:07 AM
I'm so confused. Who the hell is supposed to be the recipient of the supposed slap-in-the-face comments from that news story?

So many theories.

I NEED CLOSURE!!!

Here. This is your slap-in-da-Texans-face from SI's Don Banks....

• If you love stats, Matt Schaub (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/nfl/players/6849) can be your guy. But when it comes to winning the games you're suppose to win, Schaub is not among the league's elite quarterbacks. And anybody who tells you he is, is misinformed.

• Easy pick for my frauds of the week. It's the Texans. A perennial chic pick to finally make the playoffs, Houston laid a total egg at home against the Jets, scoring no points on offense, and producing just 11 first downs and 183 total yards. And what is it about Gary Kubiak's club in September? They're 2-9 in the season's first month in his four seasons, with six consecutive losses.
I've been skeptical all along that Houston is headed for a breakthrough year. I'm more dubious than ever after watching the Texans' efforts in Week 1. They richly deserved those late-game boos that rang out throughout Reliant Stadium.

Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/don_banks/09/13/snap.judgments.week.1/index.html#ixzz0RLSsQuUa

steds
09-17-2009, 06:31 AM
It's a mighty shame that Mr. Banks can't spell sceptical.

Runner
09-17-2009, 06:42 AM
It's a mighty shame that Mr. Banks can't spell sceptical.


sceptical is a variant of skeptical. Both are correct.

El Tejano
09-17-2009, 07:49 AM
It's amazing how many skeptics have come out of the woodwork all of a sudden when they've had all offseason to say this.

blitz90
09-17-2009, 08:13 AM
We deserve that.

CloakNNNdagger
09-17-2009, 08:16 AM
It's amazing how many skeptics have come out of the woodwork all of a sudden when they've had all offseason to say this.

Isn't it more amazing how many fans have come out of the woodwork all of a sudden when they've had a long established repeating pattern since 2004 and another preseason to boot, to say this? :thinking:

Craig.
09-17-2009, 08:24 AM
sceptical is a variant of skeptical. Both are correct.

I've never actually seen it spelled with a c. Then again, those Brits will add the occasional unnecessary u to words like labor and flavor. ;)

CloakNNNdagger
09-17-2009, 09:13 AM
I've never actually seen it spelled with a c. Then again, those Brits will add the occasional unnecessary u to words like labor and flavor. ;)

Being born in Paris with French as the first language (now entirely apple pie and American flag), it is interesting to note that the original spelling was not "sKeptic," although here in the US it is the preferred.

FYI:

The American spelling (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_spelling_differences# Miscellaneous_spelling_differences), akin to Greek, was preferred by Fowler, and is used by many Canadians, where it is the earlier form.[122] Sceptic also pre-dates the European settlement of the U.S., and it follows the French sceptique and Latin scepticus. In the mid-18th century, Dr. Johnson's dictionary listed skeptic without comment or alternative, but this form has never been popular in the U.K.;[123] sceptic, an equal variant in the old Webster's Third (1961), has now become "chiefly British". Australians generally follow the British usage (with the notable exception of the Australian Skeptics). All of these versions are pronounced with a hard "c", though in French that letter is silent and the word is pronounced like septique.