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76Texan
07-10-2009, 04:18 AM
In honor of Air Coryell, I thought the name would be fitting for Antoine Caldwell.

Now, I never want to belittle or ridicule a player, only for unmalicious fun and humor.

Also, when I see something, I call the spade as it is.
I would admit that my view might be clouded at times for various reasons.
But I am a Texan! :texflag:

Back to Caldwell... well, well, well...
I haven't seen a guy hitting so much air on a football field; "donc" "thus" "therefore" the name "Air Caldwell".

I've read different things about the offensive line scheme at Bama.
Before Saban:

http://www.tigerrag.com/?p=979

Now:
http://www.wfaa.com/sharedcontent/dws/spt/football/nfl/draft/stories/042709dnsponfltexans1.2f62a0e.html

and this:

http://www.milehighreport.com/2009/3/29/805502/c-antoine-caldwell-alabama

Pros: Good height and plays with a wider base than his weight may signal. Excellent burst after the snap.

Cons: Could be more aware and help the quarterback as plays break down

Styg's Broncos Fit: A leader and a motivator, Caldwell is stronger than his measurables might indicate, getting most of his power from his lower body. Not the most effective player on the move, nor does he seem to possess other great prospects' feel for the pocket and protecting their QB, but he does handle line calls and pre-snap reads adequately. A stronger type of center that would be suitable for a power scheme, but to the degree that Denver continues with zone-block, should lose value.

.........
to be continued

Silver Oak
07-10-2009, 07:31 AM
Caldwell is a tremendous chip blocker who can block a defensive lineman and quickly move to the second tier of the defense to hit a linebacker or safety. Caldwell has excellent footwork during pass blocking and can maintain his blocks very well. Caldwell maintains a low center of gravity which is excellent when he moves to the NFL level.


seems to be some contradictory scouting, but I prefer to think that Coach Gibbs watched tape of Caldwell and decided he could be effective on the move like the above quote mentions.

Nice find...looking forward to watching him play.

TimeKiller
07-10-2009, 02:09 PM
I'm really pulling for Caldwell. I think he's the team's future at C and it's just up to him as far as when.

76Texan
07-10-2009, 02:14 PM
I believe Caldwell still needs to master a lot of techniques before he can play for us.

Perhaps with Gibbs coaching, and now that he can concentrate on the ZBS, he can learn it all sooner. (Saban uses a mix of drive and zone blocking at Bama.)

m5kwatts
07-10-2009, 02:57 PM
They wouldn't have drafted him if they didn't think he fit the scheme

76Texan
07-10-2009, 03:28 PM
They wouldn't have drafted him if they didn't think he fit the scheme

As mentioned in one of those articles, Caldwell was in the ZBS with Shula in his soph year.

And Saban used a mix of power and zone.

Silver Oak
07-10-2009, 04:15 PM
As mentioned in one of those articles, Caldwell was in the ZBS with Shula in his soph year.

And Saban used a mix of power and zone.

maybe one of the OL guys can answer this...do the Texans run their version of zone blocking in the RZ, or do they mix it up inside, lets say, the 10 yard line?

infantrycak
07-10-2009, 04:16 PM
maybe one of the OL guys can answer this...do the Texans run their version of zone blocking in the RZ, or do they mix it up inside, lets say, the 10 yard line?

They mix it up.

MojoMan
07-10-2009, 04:55 PM
Just because Caldwell is not a perfect fit for our offense now does not mean that he cannot learn and grow, and eventually become an outstanding center. Whose skill set is fully and completely developed the day that they graduate college? Probably no one. It may take him a few years, but that's OK. The Texans have Myers as their starter and several strong OL coaches to help develop Caldwell in the months and years to come.

I really think this is a very exciting pick.

76Texan
07-10-2009, 05:30 PM
Caldwell's attributes:

He's a willing and quite efficient dive/cut blocker (that ought to sit well with Gibbs.) He's quick off the snap, especially when going low immediately.
This also helps get him ready for the block, definitely helpful in combo.
As long as he can stay low with his pads.

Once they started the train, he's an able car-pusher from the back.

He has good build and a wide, low base.

His home improvement list:

Inconsistency in his stance. At times getting up too high, making him vulnerable to all the pushings and shovings.

Doesn't have outstanding flexibilty, so he needs to really work on his lateral movements, keeping his feet moving, and quicker.

His hands techniques are also inconsistent.
When he got low in the pads, you figured he would win the battle, but sometimes he ended up getting pushed back instead.
He has an arm span of 34", so that's good. But maybe he's a bit wide in the body, and his arms aren't all that long???
Otherwise, it must be his arm and hand techniques???
The defenders seem to get off this block a bit too easy at times.

Perhaps because he's so used to the high frequency of dive and cut blocks - as compared to other centers - (and all the snaps in practice), he's a bit too eager to lunge too often, and too early.
That makes it easier for the defender to avoid him; he commits a tad too soon on the block at times. Both on the line and on the second level.
Why I said he's hitting air so much.

He needs to work to square off to the LOS quickly in pass-pro with low pad level to avoid from being pushed back or allowing penetration into the backfield.

In the outside zone run, he needs to be more aware of the backside defender to avoid from being pushed into the guard (toward the running lane) or the backfield, clogging up the cutback lane.

One the second level, he needs to be more affirmative in his action.
If he misses a defender or can't find one, he wants to move on quickly and not looking lost.

The list is long, how soon can Gibbs learn him the nuances of his version of ZBS is anybody's guess.

There was some report about his inconsistent performance at the Senior Bowl that had scouts concerned. I agreed with that.
The two late games (Florida and Utah), among others, also add to my worries.

Ironically, his first game of the season (Clemson) was probably his best (against decent competition), when he played consistently with low pad level and aggressiveness, despite staying on the field some 40 mins and 80 plays (oh well, maybe Clemson wasn't all that competitive, LOL!)