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View Full Version : Cowboys Practice Bubble collapses on players, media, fans


Texaninlild
05-02-2009, 04:51 PM
It just popped up on my TV. Cowboys rookie camp had bubble collapse on people inside after storm passes through Valley Ranch. There are still people trapped inside at the moment.

Texaninlild
05-02-2009, 04:55 PM
http://cbs11tv.com/

RTP2110
05-02-2009, 05:01 PM
Holy crap, I hope everyone is okay.

I always wondered just how sturdy those things really are

BSofA04
05-02-2009, 05:23 PM
http://cowboysblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2009/05/cowboys-indoor-facility-collapses-during.html

I hope everyone is ok.

texasguy346
05-02-2009, 05:43 PM
http://cowboysblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2009/05/cowboys-indoor-facility-collapses-during.html

I hope everyone is ok.

Wow! What a terrifying experience that must've been. I, too, hope everyone is okay.

Dan B.
05-02-2009, 05:59 PM
God must have preferred the roof in the old Texas Stadium.

ArlingtonTexan
05-02-2009, 06:07 PM
10 people unjured per latest report

HoustonFrog
05-02-2009, 06:08 PM
http://i39.tinypic.com/348m63c.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/2ld7jop.jpg

swtbound07
05-02-2009, 06:18 PM
hope its nothing serious, injury wise.

Dan B.
05-02-2009, 06:18 PM
Call me callous, but WTF was everyone doing in an inflatable building during a tornado watch?

Second Honeymoon
05-02-2009, 06:20 PM
God bless the fans, staff, and players. This is a horrible thing to happen and I can only hope and pray that no one was seriously injured or worse.

At first glance, this doesnt look good at all.

Dan B.
05-02-2009, 06:24 PM
I'm serious. How on earth do they allow people to remain in a building supported by air pressure during a tornado? Are they not aware of what happens when tornadoes hit?

ArlingtonTexan
05-02-2009, 07:00 PM
No players with significant injuries. One coach taken away in an ambulance.

Texan JBZ
05-02-2009, 07:01 PM
Hope everyone is okay. That's scary.

ArlingtonTexan
05-02-2009, 07:02 PM
I'm serious. How on earth do they allow people to remain in a building supported by air pressure during a tornado? Are they not aware of what happens when tornadoes hit?

From what I can tell locally, the building had been fine during other severe weather situations.

ArlingtonTexan
05-02-2009, 07:09 PM
From the press update

70 total people in the building

10 taken to hospitals
2 walk in to area hospital
2 or 3 with serious injuries beyond cuts, bruises (no lives in danger)

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 07:11 PM
From what I can tell locally, the building had been fine during other severe weather situations.


That's good to know!!!!! Next time a bad storm comes up, I plan to run right out of my home and find a sturdy bubble. Nothing like having the advantage of staying well informed.:tiphat:

ArlingtonTexan
05-02-2009, 07:17 PM
That's good to know!!!!! Next time a bad storm comes up, I plan to run right out of my home and find a sturdy bubble. Nothing like having the advantage of staying well informed.:tiphat:

yeah, yeah i was parroting info w/o actually thinking about what was actually said.

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 07:21 PM
StarTelegram (http://www.star-telegram.com/804/story/1353967.html) adds info on the incident, although the four staff taken to the hospital, including a leg laceration to special teams coach Joe DeCamillis is being questioned by PFT per Cowboys spokesman announcement. (http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/05/02/several-injuries-at-cowboys-practice-facility/)

http://media.star-telegram.com/smedia/2009/05/02/16/130-cowboys_roofcollapse2.embedded.prod_affiliate.58.j pg

WWJD
05-02-2009, 07:24 PM
A friend called me from Dallas and said somebody is listed in critical condition. Apparently he was impaled with something. Suspected tornado.

Praying for all involved.

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 07:30 PM
yeah, yeah i was parroting info w/o actually thinking about what was actually said.

I understood that...............but there's no smiley for "facetious."

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 07:35 PM
This from Fox News

IRVING, Texas (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,518717,00.html) — Cowboys special teams coach Joe DeCamillis was among at least five people injured Saturday when the roof of the team's indoor practice facility collapsed in a storm during a rookie minicamp.

Cowboys spokesman Rich Dalrymple said four team support staff members were injured and all players and coaches were accounted for. He didn't know the extent of the injuries to the four, who he said were hospitalized.

Witnesses said lights started flickering and shaking minutes before the collapse, prompting players, coaches, staff members and reporters to vacate the building. Several people were trying to exit the facility when the roof collapsed.

"I saw it coming down and didn't have time to react," secondary coach Dave Campo said. "I hit the ground and was able to get back up."

The storm was producing winds measured at 64 mph just before it struck the Cowboys facility, said National Weather Service meteorologist Joe Harris in Fort Worth. Power was out at the team's Valley Ranch headquarters.

DeCamillis was seen putting on a neck brace and being taken out of the team's main office building on a stretcher. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, in a TV interview from the Kentucky Derby, said 27 rookies were going through the workout.

"We're lucky no one got electrocuted with all the water in the building," head coach Wade Phillips said. "A couple of players had minor injuries, but they were all right."

The roof is a large air-supported canopy with aluminum frames covering a regulation 100-yard football field. The team was going through the second of three days of workouts for rookie draft picks and free agents.

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 07:38 PM
ESPN report that the local CBS affiliate (KTVT 11) had talked to assistant coach Brett Maxie, who had a gash in his leg that he apparently suffered during the roof collapse.

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 07:44 PM
Here's an amazing video of the collapse caught by a CNN camera man. LINK (http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/05/02/cowboys.practice.field.collapse/index.html?iref=mpstoryview#cnnSTCVideo)

ArlingtonTexan
05-02-2009, 07:56 PM
I understood that...............but there's no smiley for "facetious."

FWIW, my wife thought our exchange was funny despite circumstances

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 07:58 PM
IRVING — At least seven people were injured Saturday afternoon when the roof of the Dallas Cowboys indoor practice facility collapsed.

Irving Mayor Herbert Gears said one person was critically injured after being impaled by a falling object. He said another person was struck in the head.

Cowboys spokesman Rich Dalrymple said four team support members were injured and all players and coaches were accounted for, and he didn't know the extent of the injuries to the four staff members, who were hospitalized.

For the rest of the extensive article LINK (http://www.wfaa.com/sharedcontent/dws/wfaa/latestnews/stories/wfaa090502_lj_cowboys.11e43627.html)

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 08:05 PM
A camera man probably having fallen from the scalfolding and broke his arm. There are now greater than 50 reported injuries.

NEW VIDEO just released LINK (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqYVnkbVmOo)

Evidently, the weather warnings were braodcast during practice with no one within having heard them.

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 08:09 PM
Mickey Spagnola (feature writer for DallasCowboys.com) was evidently seriously injured per 1310 The Ticket

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 08:30 PM
http://cowboysblog.dallasnews.com/assets_c/2009/05/NS_02Cowdamage3-thumb-300x185-40993.jpg


http://cowboysblog.dallasnews.com/assets_c/2009/05/NS_02CowboysCollapse2-thumb-300x199-40990.jpg


http://cowboysblog.dallasnews.com/assets_c/2009/05/NS_02CowboysCollapse1-thumb-300x199-40987.jpg

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 08:41 PM
Here are more pics of the catastrophe scene. http://www.fanhouse.com/news/nfl/cowboys-practice-bubble-collapses/459895

CloakNNNdagger
05-02-2009, 10:11 PM
This is a panoramic video view of the aftermath. LINK (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOlcLw1Sfww)

powerfuldragon
05-03-2009, 12:47 AM
hmm... i'm surprised there hasn't been a burst bubble joke yet.

powerfuldragon
05-03-2009, 12:51 AM
Here's an amazing video of the collapse caught by a CNN camera man. LINK (http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/05/02/cowboys.practice.field.collapse/index.html?iref=mpstoryview#cnnSTCVideo)

from ^ link

Team photographers were up in framework of structure, rode it down

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 08:56 AM
Broken back......paralysis avoided.......very fortunate in a very unfortunate incident.:

IRVING, Texas (AP) — Cowboys special teams coach Joe DeCamillis broke his back and 11 more were injured when winds just shy of tornado strength ripped through the roof of the team's indoor practice facility during a rookie minicamp Saturday.

Former coach Dan Reeves, DeCamillis' father-in-law, said the first-year Dallas coach has a couple of broken vertebrae in his lower back.

"They say he's lucky not to be paralyzed," said Reeves, adding that DeCamillis probably will have surgery. The coach was seen being removed on a stretcher wearing a neck brace.
LINK (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5h33PBb6ZTeDU4DawZhEWsaUmgcxAD97UFNTG0)




Kicker David Buehler suffered a minor concussion, gashes in his forehead and right knee in addition to having skin ripped off his ear.

He had exited the facility through a side door when he was hit by a pole. He crawled to safety and then looked back.

"My initial thought was, 'How many people are dead in this?' I thought I was just a lucky one. I was just in shock," Buehler said.

Hall had his arm pinned in the wreckage.

A 33-year-old man was impaled by an object and was taken to Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas, Irving City Manager Tommy Gonzalez said. Two other people were taken to Parkland, one with a head injury and another who suffered neck and back injuries. Another person was at Baylor Medical Center in Dallas with an open leg fracture.

Five of the injured were taken to Las Colinas Medical Center, and two more walked in later.

"I think the worst we had was a dislocated shoulder," said Owen DeWitt, director of marketing and information officer.

DeWitt said all were expected to be released soon.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/050209dnmetcowboyshp.1232041e.html

SouthSideTexan
05-03-2009, 09:02 AM
God must have preferred the roof in the old Texas Stadium.

That was classic......I just hope everybody is going to be ok.

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 09:48 AM
After this incident, it would not surprise me for questions to crop up about the use of "bubble facilities." How really safe are they under any inclement weather,i.e., lightning, winds, severe thunderstorms, flooding. Will there be a call to replace these systems with "solid" buildings?.......or will there be a call for policies of safety including defining criteria of when these facilities should be avoided or abandoned? I would have to say that a little injection of common sense would be very helpful. It is now quite evident that the local and regional radio and TV stations were announcing very severe weather alerts before and throughout the bubble practice. Announcements of neighboring tornadic activity were being broadcast. The problem was that none of the "insiders" had their transistor radios on to follow the outside happenings. And the only TV monitors in the facility were tuned into and capturing the video taping of the practice.

I've scoured most of the Dallas boards and have been appalled by some of the Cowboys haters' classless comments and jokes about the injuries, including comments to the effect that not enough of the Cowboys and staff were "wiped out." I, along with others, can by some be classified as a "Girls hater." But I dare say that not one of us revel in the pain inflicted, and only only extend our thoughts in well-wishes and hope for quick recovery for those who have been injured in this unfortunate incident.

Benign rivalry "burst bubble" jokes are sure to come when the acute results of this "blows over" (please excuse the pun), but now is not the time. It could have been our coaches, our players.

ArlingtonTexan
05-03-2009, 10:05 AM
After this incident, it would not surprise me for questions to crop up about the use of "bubble facilities." How really safe are they under any inclement weather,i.e., lightning, winds, severe thunderstorms, flooding. Will there be a call to replace these systems with "solid" buildings?.......or will there be a call for policies of safety including defining criteria of when these facilities should be avoided or abandoned? I would have to say that a little injection of common sense would be very helpful. It is now quite evident that the local and regional radio and TV stations were announcing very severe weather alerts before and throughout the bubble practice. Announcements of neighboring tornadic activity were being broadcast. The problem was that none of the "insiders" had their transistor radios on to follow the outside happenings. And the only TV monitors in the facility were tuned into and capturing the video taping of the practice.

I've scoured most of the Dallas boards and have been appalled by some of the Cowboys haters' classless comments and jokes about the injuries, including comments to the effect that not enough of the Cowboys and staff were "wiped out." I, along with others, can by some be classified as a "Girls hater." But I dare say that not one of us revel in the pain inflicted, and only only extend our thoughts in well-wishes and hope for quick recovery for those who have been injured in this unfortunate incident.

Benign rivalry "burst bubble" jokes are sure to come when the acute results of this "blows over" (please excuse the pun), but now is not the time. It could have been our coaches, our players.

unfortunately, general common sense is often not a general or common as it should be. I am guessing that teams will put in place procedures like you outlined and a couple who already have something in writing will emerge and say the nicest version of "this would never happen on our team because we have these rules written down"

WWJD
05-03-2009, 12:19 PM
After this incident, it would not surprise me for questions to crop up about the use of "bubble facilities." How really safe are they under any inclement weather,i.e., lightning, winds, severe thunderstorms, flooding. Will there be a call to replace these systems with "solid" buildings?.......or will there be a call for policies of safety including defining criteria of when these facilities should be avoided or abandoned? I would have to say that a little injection of common sense would be very helpful. It is now quite evident that the local and regional radio and TV stations were announcing very severe weather alerts before and throughout the bubble practice. Announcements of neighboring tornadic activity were being broadcast. The problem was that none of the "insiders" had their transistor radios on to follow the outside happenings. And the only TV monitors in the facility were tuned into and capturing the video taping of the practice.

I've scoured most of the Dallas boards and have been appalled by some of the Cowboys haters' classless comments and jokes about the injuries, including comments to the effect that not enough of the Cowboys and staff were "wiped out." I, along with others, can by some be classified as a "Girls hater." But I dare say that not one of us revel in the pain inflicted, and only only extend our thoughts in well-wishes and hope for quick recovery for those who have been injured in this unfortunate incident.

Benign rivalry "burst bubble" jokes are sure to come when the acute results of this "blows over" (please excuse the pun), but now is not the time. It could have been our coaches, our players.

Nice post..unfortunately people can be cruel and mean thinking they are being really clever and funny...the Chronicle story on this has comment after comment with readers laughing about this. It's really very sad. There is football and then there is life...that anybody anywhere could joke about this is sad like I said.

HoustonFrog
05-03-2009, 12:24 PM
Nice post..unfortunately people can be cruel and mean thinking they are being really clever and funny...the Chronicle story on this has comment after comment with readers laughing about this. It's really very sad. There is football and then there is life...that anybody anywhere could joke about this is sad like I said.

Agree. This was a serious incident and player were digging through debris looking for people and helping. It's amazing that people somehow think tragedy is funny as long as they "dislike" something. Of course this is sports and it just shows that some people are classless from the word go.

After my second child was born Friday I made a promise that I'll refuse to get upset over people I just read on the Chronicle site. I can't control trash so I'll let them show the world what they are made of.

eriadoc
05-03-2009, 01:31 PM
I keep seeing reports that injuries are not serious, then other reports that someone is in critical condition. Some people need to keep their trap shut, IMO. Like this guy:

A 33-year-old man was impaled by an object and was taken to Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas, Irving City Manager Tommy Gonzalez said. Two other people were taken to Parkland, one with a head injury and another who suffered neck and back injuries. Another person was at Baylor Medical Center in Dallas with an open leg fracture.

.....

"I think the worst we had was a dislocated shoulder," said Owen DeWitt, director of marketing and information officer.

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 01:48 PM
I keep seeing reports that injuries are not serious, then other reports that someone is in critical condition. Some people need to keep their trap shut, IMO. Like this guy:

Eriadoc, I believe that Dewitt is marketing and information officer for Las Colinas Medical Center, and that he was referring to the worse injury presenting to their particular hospital.

ArlingtonTexan
05-03-2009, 06:38 PM
Report: Injured Cowboys Scout Has Spinal Cord Surgery
Posted by Aaron Wilson on May 3, 2009, 6:26 p.m.
Dallas Cowboys scout Rich Behm underwent spinal cord surgery after being injured during the collapse of the team’s indoor practice facility, according to Matt Mosley of ESPN.com.

“Rich Behm could really use your prayers right now,” Mosley wrote. “I’m told that head coach Wade Phillips and owner Jerry Jones were both with Behm’s family at the hospital Saturday night. From what I’ve been told, Behm certainly has the most serious injury of the 12 people who received treatment.”

Meanwhile, the outlook is reportedlypromising for special teams coach Joe DeCamillis, who required surgery to repair two broken vertebrae.


http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/05/03/report-injured-cowboys-scout-has-spinal-cord-surgery/

ArlingtonTexan
05-03-2009, 06:44 PM
http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/05/03/report-injured-cowboys-scout-has-spinal-cord-surgery/

I have something very unconfirmed (borderline should not post) that he is paralyzed from the waist down.

WWJD
05-03-2009, 06:54 PM
I sure pray this gentleman will be ok.

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 07:37 PM
I have something very unconfirmed (borderline should not post) that he is paralyzed from the waist down.

Here is the official ESPN report and video by Matt Mosely (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4127852)(which at the end confirms the spinal cord surgery).

gtexan02
05-03-2009, 07:45 PM
I have something very unconfirmed (borderline should not post) that he is paralyzed from the waist down.

Confirmation

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4132947

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 07:47 PM
This just IN (http://cowboysblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2009/05/cowboys-scouting-assistant-paralyzed.html)


Cowboys' scouting assistant paralyzed
6:08 PM Sun, May 03, 2009 |

The Cowboys issued a release moments ago updating the status of three people that were taken to the hospital after their indoor practice facility collapsed.

Rich Behm, a scouting assistant, sustained a fracture to the thoracic spine that caused a severing of his spinal cord and permanent paralysis from the waist down. He underwent surgery Saturday night and remains at Parkland Hospital in stable condition.

Behm moved from the team's video department to scouting a few years ago and worked closely with Chris Hall, the team's college scouting coordinator, and director of college and pro scouting Tom Ciskowski.

Owner and general manager Jerry Jones and coach Wade Phillips spent a large part of Saturday night/Sunday morning with the Behm family. More coaches and players visited the hospital today.

"To the Behm family we extend our love, comfort, and the full support of every person and resource within the organization," Jones said in a statement released by the team." Rich is a courageous member of our family and someone for whom we care deeply. We ask for all friends and fans of the Dallas Cowboys to join us in embracing him and his family with their thoughts and prayers at this very difficult time."

The release also stated special teams coach Joe DeCamillis will undergo surgery Monday for a fracture of one of his cervical vertebrae. He is in stable condition without paralysis at Parkland Hospital.

Assistant athletic trainer Greg Gaither had surgery Saturday to repair a fracture of his right tibia and fibula at Baylor University Medical Center. He should be released later this week.

Here is the rest of Jones' statement: "As we share concern for everyone who was touched by this accident, we also extend our heartfelt and best wishes to Coach Joe DeCamillis and his family as they prepare for Joe's surgery tomorrow.

"We are grateful that Greg Gaither's surgery was successful, and we feel blessed that others involved were able to walk away from this accident after receiving medical attention yesterday afternoon.

"The Dallas Cowboys organization would like to express its deepest appreciation to the City of Irving's Fire, Police and medical emergency teams that collectively responded to the accident in the most timely and thorough manner yesterday. We are also grateful to those Cowboys players and staff members who acted so quickly and heroically in the face of personal danger to help those around them who were in need of immediate

GuerillaBlack
05-03-2009, 07:49 PM
That truly sucks. :(

I was hoping everyone would make a full recovery.

WWJD
05-03-2009, 08:30 PM
Oh gosh.

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 10:40 PM
As would be suspected, as the dust begins to settle, questions that I predicted (merely through common sense, and not through any spectacular clairvoiant powers) would need to be answered, are now already being asked.

************************************************** ********

So Why Did The Roof Fall In Dallas? (http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/05/03/so-why-did-the-roof-fall-in-dallas/)


As the Cowboys continue to reel from the fact that the roof of their practice facility collapsed during a thunderstorm that struck during a minicamp practice on Saturday, we turn to a simple question.

Why?

We pose that question in two parts: (1) Why did the roof fall?; and (2) Why didn’t they clear out as the storm approached?

As to the first part, the answer isn’t clear — and likely will be resolved only through litigation filed by the injured against the company that built the collapsed structure.

In this regard, Brooks Edgerton of the Dallas Morning News writes that no other buildings in the area fell during the storm, and that the manufacturer’s body of work includes a building that partially collapsed under the weight of snow in 2003, less than two months after it opened.

So look for metallurgical engineers to study the twisted steel in an effort to determine why it collapsed like the first pig’s house of straw.

As to the second part, the Cowboys presumably reacted to the approaching storm by taking practice indoors. But, even if fault lies with the company that built the structure, a professional sports team’s monitoring of the weather shouldn’t end once the players and coaches are sent under a roof. The external conditions need to be evaluated continuously, and the organization needs to be ready to instruct those within the indoor facility to seek even better cover if/when it appears that a severe thunderstorm or a tornado might strike.

Regardless, something needs to be done to ensure that the scene that unfolded Saturday in Dallas — as memorialized by these stunning pictures from the Dallas Morning News — doesn’t happen again.

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 10:50 PM
The policies, or even the concept of the bubble itself in sports may begin coming into question in general.


If you read far enough into today's Dallas Morning News coverage of the Cowboys practice facility's collapse, you'll see Irving police say their city suffered no other structural damage in Saturday's storm.

So was this building just in the wrong place at the wrong time? It's an odd thought, given that the whole point of the steel-framed, fabric-covered building is to give the team a place to practice in bad weather.
The manufacturers, Summit Structures and Cover-All Building Systems, tout their work in building other sports facilities, including ones for the New England Patriots and Texas A&M. But I can't find any mention on the company Web sites of the Cowboys facility. Why?

Another issue we're looking at: A Summit-built warehouse in Pennsylvania partially collapsed during a 2003 snowstorm, less than two months after opening. A 2007 court order blamed Summit for design flaws.

"We design for snow load and wind load," an executive for the manufacturers told a Canadian newspaper in 2003, as I reported today in The News. "It's not a bubble."

http://watchdogblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2009/05/why-did-the-cowboys-practice-f.html

gtexan02
05-03-2009, 10:59 PM
As good as designs get to withstand mother nature, they will never be invinceable. The Reliant roof was specifically designed to withstand hurricane force winds. We get a medium strength hurricane and look what happens next

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 11:03 PM
Here's an excerpt from the manufacturer's web site, touting their bubbles. You might want to look over other areas of the site. BTW, indeed, no mention of the Cowboys facility.

Brighter Better Buildings (http://www.summitstructures.com/industries/sports/index2.asp).

Picture this: Practicing, playing, competing in a naturally lit, quiet, clear-span environment filled with clean, fresh air. Summit Structures captures the best of the outdoors - indoors.

Apparently, not this time...........More like the worst of the outdoor - indoors.

Do the math: More days to play, lower operating costs, easy maintenance, fast construction. It's an easy calculation. Build a Summit Structure and spend more time doing what needs to be done, and less time worrying about your building.

.............because of easy auto - disassembly, leaving you with no building to worry about.

CloakNNNdagger
05-03-2009, 11:23 PM
As good as designs get to withstand mother nature, they will never be invinceable. The Reliant roof was specifically designed to withstand hurricane force winds. We get a medium strength hurricane and look what happens next

That's not a very good comparison or accurate assessment. First of all, Reliant lost a "roof" not the integrity of any integral structure of the stadium. The bubble was destroyed. Secondly, Reliant's integral roof structure was touted to withstand hurricane force winds to 140 mph. Winds at the time were at least 100-120 mph. This may explain it a little bit better.:

Hurricane Ike roared ashore in the early hours of Sept. 13, packing sustained winds of 110 mph. The storm killed dozens of people, caused widespread damage and knocked out power to millions. The force of winds that blasted the stadium were never accurately measured, Miller said, because weather meters on the roof were lost in the storm.

"We didn't get good readings, but we know there were Category-2 winds in the area," Miller said.

The home of the NFL's Houston Texans cost $354 million to build and was the first NFL venue with a retractable roof when it opened in 2002. The Texans' media guide claims the roof "can withstand winds as strong as 140 miles per hour when closed and secured."

Miller said the stadium responded exactly as expected.

"The fabric is designed to, before anything pulls too hard on that steel, give way," he said. "That's the key point -- it did what it was supposed to do and didn't let the actual structure get damaged."

The roof cost $4 million to fix, part of a $10 million price tag on all the repairs. They were financed by insurance and a combination of county and federal funds. The stadium is owned by Harris County, but the county was eligible to seek funds from FEMA for up to 75 percent of the repair cost.

In the days after the storm, engineers examined the stadium down to every bolt and light bulb. Below the roof, damage was only cosmetic -- broken windows, unhinged doors and minor flooding. The gears of the roof mechanism, which opens and closes the roll-top panels, still worked.

The storm snapped off three of four lightning arrestor poles affixed at the four corners of the stadium. The aluminum poles, designed to lower the building's potential for a lightning strike, are like those commonly used on skyscrapers.

"It's a hurricane. It happens," Miller said. "There's a lot of stuff flying around out there."

Most debris was found nearby. The biggest pieces simply fell into the stadium; others blew up against the Astrodome, the now-dwarfed nearby arena. Once the roof repair work is complete, Miller said engineers will lay out the damaged pieces and analyze how they reacted to the storm.

Reliant design engineers and construction personel should be commended.

texansdrummer
05-04-2009, 03:33 AM
As a Texans fan who grew up in Kansas, and used to go outdoors and watch tornadoes/weather for "fun".....I would like to say that, as crazy as me or my friends may have ever been, we would never have sought out shelter in a NFL bubble.

The issue here is simple.....when such an alert is issued, certain precautions (like halting practice in the bubble) should be taken.. This is common sense....not brain science. It is practiced with any number of organizations (MS/HS/Little League/College). In addition....let's look forward to learning the total cost of this incident in terms of the human element, vs. well...whatever else seemed to be at issue at the time. I have total sympathy for the victims of this incident, but I am astonished by the brazen disregard for the conditions that were at hand. The Cowboys should be embarrased for ignoring conditions that nearly every other level of sports organization would have deemed to be threatening.

Best wishes for a speedy recovery to anyone injured as a result of this.

SheTexan
05-04-2009, 08:16 AM
My heartfelt thoughts and prayers are with the entire Cowboy family. Accidents can happen to anyone, anytime, any place, and to even think negative thoughts after something like this happens, just because you don't like a football team, is just unbelievable to me. This is just NOT the time to hate on the "boys" or their fans.

May God bless Rich Behm, and all those that were injured, and give them strength during the long road to recovery.

nunusguy
05-04-2009, 09:59 AM
Dallas, TX (AHN) - A statement from the National Weather Service Forth Worth, TX., indicated that high winds collapsed the Dallas Cowboys practice facility Saturday, causing injury to 12 persons inside the structure.

Following a post-damage assessment of the area, the National Weather Service determined that a "microburst", which can have winds exceeding 100 mph "in extreme cases", lashed the Valley Ranch area of far North Irving resulting to the structure collapse.
A microburst results in a "localized area of strong thunderstorm winds" similar to but distinguishable from tornadoes, which generally have convergent damage.
http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7015006484
*******************************************
A "microburst" is an entirerly different kind of meteorological phenomenon
than straight-line winds. Among other things they are thought to have caused several very prominent aviation disastors in the US.

CloakNNNdagger
05-04-2009, 11:33 AM
Dallas, TX (AHN) - A statement from the National Weather Service Forth Worth, TX., indicated that high winds collapsed the Dallas Cowboys practice facility Saturday, causing injury to 12 persons inside the structure.

Following a post-damage assessment of the area, the National Weather Service determined that a "microburst", which can have winds exceeding 100 mph "in extreme cases", lashed the Valley Ranch area of far North Irving resulting to the structure collapse.
A microburst results in a "localized area of strong thunderstorm winds" similar to but distinguishable from tornadoes, which generally have convergent damage.
http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7015006484
*******************************************
A "microburst" is an entirerly different kind of meteorological phenomenon
than straight-line winds. Among other things they are thought to have caused several very prominent aviation disastors in the US.

From the same source:

The thunderstorm, which was moving through the Dallas area Saturday afternoon, was said to be carrying maximum winds of about 70 mph near the ground, according to the weather bureau.

The statement adds that based on research it was likely that winds greater than 70 mph impacted the upper portions of the facility, which gave way within 45 seconds from being hit by strong winds.

Known severe thunderstorm activity coming through the Dallas area was of no surprise, and, accordingly, public warnings were widely broadcast well ahead of this incident. This was confirmed to me by 2 of my friends living in proximate areas. Again, common sense by the organization in favor of precaution, would have gone a long way in this whole mess.

nunusguy
05-04-2009, 12:42 PM
From the same source:



Known severe thunderstorm activity coming through the Dallas area was of no surprise, and, accordingly, public warnings were widely broadcast well ahead of this incident. This was confirmed to me by 2 of my friends living in proximate areas. Again, common sense by the organization in favor of precaution, would have gone a long way in this whole mess.
Thunderstorms in N.Texas in the Spring/Summer are, as in the Houston area, of course very common but the more dangerous variety with strong tornadoes, large hail, and extreme straight-line winds are much more apt to occur with the TStorms in the DFW area. And so are "microbursts", and this damage to the Cowboys training facility has the looks of a microburst.
Even though I've been interested in the weather and storms for a long time, I had hardly even heard the term "microburst" until one day 'back in the 90s when my brother and I were fishing way out west on a very well known trout-stream in western Montana called "Rock Creek". We came around this bend on this beautiful Rocky Mountain stream that was in heavy timber, and there was this incredible site: these pine trees, all of which were maybe 40, 50 feet or more in height had been blown down in all directions and lying/facing away from the center of the damage. We had no idea what we were looking at, except for postings on signs at the site by the state of Montana & the US Weather Service with explanations of the natural event that had occured several years earlier. It's one of the wierdest yet most impressive natural scenes I've ever seen. But damage to the immediate area was massive and I have no doubt that a similar event could produce the kind of destruction they had up in Irving,

Texan_Bill
05-04-2009, 01:07 PM
I think my feelings towards the Cowboys are well documented, but first and foremost I'm a human being. Thoughts and prayers to those affected, their families, friends and the entire Cowboys family.

ArlingtonTexan
05-05-2009, 08:11 AM
This does not look good for the Cowboys or the City of Irving.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/spt/football/cowboys/stories/050509dnmetcowboyscollapse.3e6aae3.html

The Dallas Cowboys applied last year for a building permit to replace the high-tension fabric roof on the indoor practice facility that collapsed Saturday and injured 12 people. But the team never had city officials inspect any completed work, which is required by Irving's building code.

In city documents released Monday, the team is listed as the general contractor for the reroofing project that was estimated to cost $600,000. Irving does not issue a building permit unless the general contractor is registered with the city. The Cowboys registered as a general contractor on the same day they requested a permit for the roof work.


City officials were aware that work began on the roof last year but never received word from the team that it was complete.

Team officials declined to answer questions about the work Monday.

Officials with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration were in Valley Ranch on Monday investigating what caused the 85-foot-tall facility's high-tension fabric shell and metal structure to fold onto itself and collapse Saturday. The National Weather Service said a microburst of up to 70-mph wind carried by passing thunderstorms struck the facility.

About 70 players, coaches, team support personnel and members of the media were inside. Ambulances transported 10 injured people; two others sought help on their own, officials said.

Scouting assistant Rich Behm was permanently paralyzed from the waist down after he suffered a spine fracture. Special teams coach Joe DeCamillis successfully underwent surgery Monday to stabilize a fractured vertebra in his neck and was expected to be released from the hospital later this week. Assistant athletic trainer Greg Gaither was expected to remain at Baylor University Medical Center while his broken right leg heals.

It was unclear Monday what level of rains or winds the building was built to withstand. The roles that weather and the structure's design or construction played in the collapse may not be known for months.

OSHA investigators will interview witnesses, survey the site and "get as much information as we can" to determine what specifically brought the building down.

No findings will be made public until OSHA completes its investigation, which could take up to six months.

"Every case is different," said OSHA spokeswoman Elizabeth Todd.

The site will not be cleared until agency officials have completed their investigation, Todd said.

Gary Miller, the city's planning and inspections director, said the city probably will not pursue a building code violation citation. He said that if the building were still standing, the city's approach would have first been to issue a warning notice.

But he said city officials will closely watch the results of any investigations.

"We would rely on any reports that come out of this investigation just to become more intelligent out of what happened," Miller said.


Permit application

The Cowboys' permit application does not list any subcontractors or other companies that may have worked on the reroofing project.

The structure passed all inspections during initial construction and was issued a certificate of occupancy later in 2003, city documents indicate. Miller said the city has never received any indication that there was a problem with the construction.

It was unclear Monday what led the Cowboys to request the reroofing permit last year. Miller said replacing a roof does not require an architect or structural engineer. In the practice facility's case, Miller said the city's main concern was that the fabric roof was flame-retardant. City documents indicate that it was.

Miller said the city's building code requires contractors to inform the city when permitted work is done so city officials can inspect the projects.

"We rely on them to be responsible," Miller said.

An attorney for the Cowboys could also not be reached for comment Monday.


Summit Structures

The president of Summit Structures of Allentown, Pa., which built the structure, said in a written statement Monday that he was working with Cowboys and local officials in assessing the situation.

"We understand there is a great deal of concern and curiosity about what happened on Saturday, but rather than speculate, we are focused on being part of the effort to find answers and assist the team," Nathan Stobbe said in a statement.

In 2007, a Pennsylvania judge, relying on an expert's assessment, found that a structure Summit built for the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority on the Delaware River collapsed because of "failure of the design" to account for snow buildup on the roof, court documents show.

That structure had a double roof construction, which is different from the Dallas Cowboys' structure.

Judge Allan Tereshko wrote that the Philadelphia structure collapsed "under the weight of the first significant snowfall" of the year, conditions that "would have been easily tolerated by the building had it been properly designed and constructed."

In his prepared statement, Stobbe said licensed engineers oversaw the Cowboys facility's initial 2003 construction and the reroofing last year.

"As is the industry standard, Summit Structures designs, engineers and builds to meet local building codes," a spokeswoman for Summit, Mariellen Burns, wrote in an e-mail Monday.

According to city documents, Manhattan Construction Co. was the general contractor for the practice facility's construction. Manhattan is the same company serving as general contractor on the Cowboys' new $1.1 billion stadium in Arlington.

A Manhattan official who served as project manager on the practice facility construction did not return a phone call seeking comment Monday.

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said Monday that the league would be reviewing the event with the Cowboys and following developments.

Staff writers Chuck Carlton and Brooks Egerton contributed to this report.

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 09:10 AM
This does not look good for the Cowboys or the City of Irving.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/spt/football/cowboys/stories/050509dnmetcowboyscollapse.3e6aae3.html

It was unclear Monday what level of rains or winds the building was built to withstand.

It was unclear Monday what led the Cowboys to request the reroofing permit last year.

I find these statements somewhat curious, especially the latter.

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 09:26 AM
One other comment. When Ike came through, and the Texans prophylactically deflated their practice bubble, I had discussed the subject of what types of winds the structure could withstand. During this discussion, I asked if opening the "doors" to a structure like this during high winds would affect its stability (which seemed to make sense to me) since inside to outside pressure relationship would likely be changed. His response was that it could significantly lessen the the "tolerances" of the the structure.

It would be interesting to know if any of the "doors" were open, or used to come and go during the adverse weather conditions.

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 09:40 AM
The NFL spokesman:


Aiello also made clear that the incident is being taken seriously by the 31 other franchises.

“Every team in our league is well aware of what happened and taking every step to check on their facilities,” Aiello said. “We’re confident they’re looking closely at it. Everybody shares the same interest in learning from the situation and applying the lessons from that.

“It’s a unique weather situation. We know that.”

Aiello also explained that the decision regarding whether to practice in adverse conditions constitutes a “team call.” In our estimation, this incident will result at a minimum in the issuance of standards negotiated by the league and the NFL Players Association applicable to practicing outdoors — and indoors — during bad weather.

On one hand, we’re amazed it’s taken so long for an event triggering such action. On the other hand, it’s a no-brainer that such standards need to be in place going forward.

LINK (http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/05/05/league-says-teams-are-on-their-own-regarding-practice-facilities/)

ArlingtonTexan
05-05-2009, 09:51 AM
One other comment. When Ike came through, and the Texans prophylactically deflated their practice bubble, I had discussed the subject of what types of winds the structure could withstand. During this discussion, I asked if opening the "doors" to a structure like this during high winds would affect its stability (which seemed to make sense to me) since inside to outside pressure relationship would likely be changed. His response was that it could significantly lessen the the "tolerances" of the the structure.

It would be interesting to know if any of the "doors" were open, or used to come and go during the adverse weather conditions.

The cowboys basically have a giant tent versus a true air supported bubble like the Texans. Not good enough with science to know how that influences pressure.

from the chron.com

In the aftermath of the collapse of the Dallas Cowboys’ practice facility, the Texans are doing what they can to ensure the safety of their players and employees as they prepare to begin organized team activities this month.

The Texans’ practice facility is different from the one the Cowboys have used since 2003. Constructed by Yeadon, a company based in Canada, the Texans’ bubble is an air-supported structure.

“First and foremost, we don’t have the steel frame,” said Lloyd Richards, the Texans’ director of football operations. “There is no framing inside that keeps it up. (The Cowboys) have a skeleton with tent material over it. Ours is truly a balloon, supported by air pressure only. If something came down, it would be only material. Structurally, that’s the biggest difference.”

The Texans use their indoor facility a number of times each season, mostly to escape heat and rain .

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 11:29 AM
The cowboys basically have a giant tent versus a true air supported bubble like the Texans. Not good enough with science to know how that influences pressure.

from the chron.com

Thanks for the info. It would seem that with a tent-like structure, the Aerodynamics and inside/outside pressures would be that much more affected by the "open door" factor.

Joe Texan
05-05-2009, 11:38 AM
It would be interesting to know if any of the "doors" were open, or used to come and go during the adverse weather conditions.


With 70 people in the tent I would think it was opening quite regularly

Joe Texan
05-05-2009, 12:46 PM
Cowboys in a big mess what with the no inspection on the structure and being the Contractor and all. Big Lawsuit in the works, sorry to hear but Jerry is Jerry

ArlingtonTexan
05-05-2009, 03:20 PM
from profootballtalk.com

Lack Of Roof Inspection By Cowboys Is A Red Herring
Posted by Mike Florio on May 5, 2009, 10:21 a.m.
As the reports continue to flow regarding the collapse of the Cowboys’ indoor practice facility during a Saturday storm, there’s one specific development that has far less meaning than the superficial news items might suggest.

Per the Dallas Morning News, the Cowboys failed to have Irving, Texas officials inspect the new roof that was placed on the structure in 2008, five years after it was first built.

It’s a non-issue, in our view. If the new roof had been inspected, the folks who inspect such structures for the City of Irving undoubtedly would have done nothing to confirm whether the steel beams under the roof would have survived winds reportedly in the range of only 70 miles per hour.

Implicit in this report is the vague notion that the Cowboys were in some way at fault for this incident. Barring evidence that Cowboys officials personally designed or built the structure, the Cowboys simply aren’t responsible for what happened.

Moreover, the Cowboys employees injured in the collapse most likely have no recourse against the team apart from the Texas no-fault workers’ compensation system.

It’s a simple proposition. Once upon a time, employers were flooded with lawsuits resulting from workplace injuries. And so most states (presumably, every state) created a system for paying employees who suffer injuries while on the job.

Here the quid pro quo: The employee gets compensation for medical bills and lost wages and permanent impairment, and the employer receives immunity from a negligence lawsuit.

The primary exception to immunity is intentional conduct, or in some states a high degree of recklessness involving actual knowledge of a specific risk followed by a failure to fix it.

For example, if there were evidence in this case that, after a prior storm involving strong winds, the Cowboys determined that the structure was at risk of falling but opted to ignore the situation, the employees might, depending on the niceties of Texas law, have grounds for pursuing additional relief from the team.

Here, there’s no reason to believe that the Cowboys had any reason to think that the facility would fall, and the focal point of the potential blame for this incident continues to be at this point the company that designed and built the structure. In our opinion, the question of whether the Cowboys dotted every “i” and crossed every “t” regarding the City of Irving’s permitting process is meaningless in this regard.

UPDATE: Under Section 408.001 of the Texas workers’ compensation laws, an employer can be sued only if the employee dies and if the accident arose from gross negligence of intentional conduct. So, basically, the injured employees cannot sue the Cowboys.

Dan B.
05-05-2009, 03:33 PM
UPDATE: Under Section 408.001 of the Texas workers’ compensation laws, an employer can be sued only if the employee dies and if the accident arose from gross negligence of intentional conduct. So, basically, the injured employees cannot sue the Cowboys.

A bit OT but what an awful law. Your family can only sue if you are dead? I can think of limitless situations where an employee might be injured through intentional misconduct and is crippled, unable to earn a living for life. This law takes any medical and lost wage compensation from them? Unbelievably bad IMO.

Specnatz
05-05-2009, 04:15 PM
UPDATE: Under Section 408.001 of the Texas workers’ compensation laws, an employer can be sued only if the employee dies and if the accident arose from gross negligence of intentional conduct. So, basically, the injured employees cannot sue the Cowboys.

I would think not obeying the laws is a gross negligence. The cowboys can claim all they want that not getting it inspected has nothing to do with the collapse but that is just their opinion. maybe if it was inspected a flaw might have been noticed.

That is like a used car salesman saying this is a dependable car trust me.

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 05:20 PM
I would think not obeying the laws is a gross negligence. The cowboys can claim all they want that not getting it inspected has nothing to do with the collapse but that is just their opinion. maybe if it was inspected a flaw might have been noticed.

That is like a used car salesman saying this is a dependable car trust me.

Much like I see it. This is not so much an employer/employee "workman's compensation" question as much as it is a lawsuit waiting to happen concerning a contractor's legal responsibilities to ensuring the quality and safety of a structure as relates to the occupants. Of course, this is not to exclude others' potential liabilities.

Brando
05-05-2009, 05:35 PM
I think my feelings towards the Cowboys are well documented, but first and foremost I'm a human being. Thoughts and prayers to those affected, their families, friends and the entire Cowboys family.

Eaxactly TB.


They need to inpsect that huge HD TV and scoreboard that will be hanging over the playing field in the new stadium.

Tedc
05-05-2009, 06:02 PM
"The primary exception to immunity is intentional conduct, or in some states a high degree of recklessness involving actual knowledge of a specific risk followed by a failure to fix it."


I think it would be easy to prove they knew something was wrong with it. They applied for a permit last year.

"It was unclear Monday what led the Cowboys to request the reroofing permit last year. "

I think I have an idea.

ArlingtonTexan
05-05-2009, 06:21 PM
Much like I see it. This is not so much an employer/employee "workman's compensation" question as much as it is a lawsuit waiting to happen concerning a contractor's legal responsibilities to ensuring the quality and safety of a structure as relates to the occupants. Of course, this is not to exclude others' potential liabilities.

Yep, and that where both Irving and the cowboys will have issues. The Cowboys became "contractors" all of a sudden on the day they applied for the permit. While city of Irving is trying to say that its the contractor's responsibility to call them, my experience with inspectors in building my first home (another state, wife and career ago) is that they show up unannounced all through the process.

Speaking of comon sense, is it not easier for everyone if a flaw is found during the construction/repair process then getting to end and then going you guys scewed up. IMO, if waiting to end is really the policy of Irving it is a terrible one.

The Cowboys have to answer why did they think to do a half million plus repair on a "structure" that was five years old. Also, not surpising that a contractor with little experience dealing with a municipality would not dot all its Is.

Texan_Bill
05-05-2009, 06:55 PM
Jerry's a dumbass for a couple of reasons. He has Manhattan Construction Company building his palace. Can you say $600,000.00 Change Order? Had he given this work to Manhattan he, the Cowboys and Manhattan would've been held harmless and indemnified.

Every subcontractor signs a subcontract with the General Contractor. In those contracts, there is always an article for Indemnification and Hold Harmless clause:

19. Indemnify for Personal Injury and Property Damage:
To the fullest extent permitted by law, Subcontractor agrees to defend, hold harmless and unconditionally indemnify CONTRACTOR and OWNER, their officers, directors, share holders (etc, etc.)…blah, blah, blah……


Also, generally in the boilerplate, there is typically language about "Acts of God"

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 07:50 PM
The Cowboys named Manhattan as included in services rendered to the roof repair..................thank G-d they weren't involved in building Reliant's roof....................oh, I just remembered, Manhattan was the contractor for the first NFL rolling roof......................at Reliant Stadium. :gun:

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 07:55 PM
This is a very extensive article reviewing Stadium and practice bubble facilities.........the differences in construction, the differences in costs, the problems already identified, the present concerns, and what different entities are doing to avoid another similar incident from occuring.


Lessons learned from Cowboys tragedy (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4141498)

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 08:24 PM
This becomes more disconcerting (http://www.star-telegram.com/332/story/1357384.html) as information comes out.:

Kishor Mehta, an engineering professor at Texas Tech University and former director of its Wind Science and Engineering research center, said construction standards for the Dallas area require such structures to withstand winds of at least 90 mph, and they should be able to handle gusts hitting 110.
Mehta noted that such buildings are designed with no redundancies in construction.

That can lead to the progressive collapse of an entire structure should failure occur at any point, he said.

ArlingtonTexan
05-05-2009, 08:44 PM
This is a very extensive article reviewing Stadium and practice bubble facilities.........the differences in construction, the differences in costs, the problems already identified, the present concerns, and what different entities are doing to avoid another similar incident from occuring.


Lessons learned from Cowboys tragedy

this one is not coming up as a link

CloakNNNdagger
05-05-2009, 08:57 PM
this one is not coming up as a link

Sorry, fixed the link.

Dread-Head
05-05-2009, 10:30 PM
Despite all the negative things I say about:

The Cowboys
Their Fans
and everything affiliated with them, I have been praying for the men involved in this accident and their families since this happened. I'm just thankful no one was killed.

Joe Texan
05-06-2009, 11:19 AM
http://www.yahoo.com/s/1067964


Seems the cowboys are guilty of hiring a firm that has a history of trouble with these types of Buildings. Mainly the engineer. This bonehead needs to go back to engineer school.

Wolf
05-06-2009, 12:03 PM
Could the Texans bubble collapse?


"I know Decamillis is going through tough surgery today. I had a few conversations with some people keeping me up to date on what’s going on. But all our prayers are with him. It’s very unfortunate," said Texans head coach Gary Kubiak.

Because of what happened with the Cowboys practice facility, officials at the Texans front office are looking into the safety of their practice bubble.

“Depending on what the winds and the weather reports are, we’ve got our procedures in place. I’m sure the Cowboys did as well,” said Texans General Manager Rick Smith. “It’ll give us pause to revisit those procedures and make sure we are as safe as possible.’

One of those safety measures includes deflating the bubble, which is what happened, as Hurricane Ike approached in September 2008.

The Texans practice bubble is a totally different structure than the Cowboys practice facility.

Unlike the Cowboy’s structure, there is no steel or wood framing. It’s supported only by air and re-enforced by cables.

The manufacturer says it surpasses the local building codes for wind protection.





http://www.khou.com/sports/texans/stories/khou090504_mp_texans-bubble.1ce2a27e.html

Texan_Bill
05-06-2009, 01:04 PM
The Cowboys named Manhattan as included in services rendered to the roof repair..................thank G-d they weren't involved in building Reliant's roof....................oh, I just remembered, Manhattan was the contractor for the first NFL rolling roof......................at Reliant Stadium. :gun:

Well sort of... It was Manhattan in a joint venture with Beers Skanska (which is now Skanska USA).

CloakNNNdagger
05-06-2009, 01:36 PM
Well sort of... It was Manhattan in a joint venture with Beers Skanska (which is now Skanska USA).

And Reliant had a different roof manufacturer, Birdair Inc., who interestingly worked with a "rope team" under The Reel Group to repair the Ike-damaged roof.

CloakNNNdagger
05-06-2009, 05:38 PM
Fortunately, Buehler only got just a bit nicked up with the collapse. Nick Folk just underwent a right hip labrum repair that will probably knock him out for 3-4 months.

CloakNNNdagger
05-08-2009, 08:51 AM
State engineering board checking Irving's oversight of Cowboys practice facility (State engineering board checking Irving's oversight of Cowboys practice facility)

Lance Kinney, a spokesman for the engineering board, declined Thursday to elaborate on the scope of the inquiry. Irving officials said they had no comment.

The city earlier this week said it has no record of the engineer who signed off on the project's design. The city also said it does not have the building's blueprints or specifications on file, even though state officials said Thursday that those documents should be kept for the life of the building.

Texas requires officials who enforce engineering-related laws to accept planning documents only if they bear an engineer's seal. Violations are punishable by up to a year in jail.

The engineering board's investigators also are researching whether they could take action against facility builder Summit Structures and its parent company. The firms lacked a required state license when they designed and built the Cowboys facility.

Irving planning and inspections director Gary Miller said Monday that the necessary seal probably appeared on documents that the city did not retain. Spaces for engineering seals were left blank on the facility's building permit application that the city provided to media on Monday. Miller said that no other records existed other than those made available Monday.

Last year, Summit replaced the fabric on the Cowboys facility. Irving officials have said the Cowboys never had them inspect any completed re-covering, as required by the city building code.


This is only one facet of the investigation into the tragedy.

WWJD
05-08-2009, 10:15 AM
Fortunately, Buehler only got just a bit nicked up with the collapse. Nick Folk just underwent a right hip labrum repair that will probably knock him out for 3-4 months.

They are expecting Folk to be the FG kicker again this year. The other guy is supposedly just going to kick off. Ok whatever...

CloakNNNdagger
05-11-2009, 08:36 AM
Records reveal a 4.8 million dollar settlement for a "similar collapse" due to a dissimilar cause. Investigations continue.LINK (http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/05/10/manufacturer-of-cowboys-indoor-facility-paid-48-million-for-prior-collapse/)

Speedy
05-11-2009, 02:16 PM
Could the Texans bubble collapse?


"I know Decamillis is going through tough surgery today. I had a few conversations with some people keeping me up to date on what’s going on. But all our prayers are with him. It’s very unfortunate," said Texans head coach Gary Kubiak.

Because of what happened with the Cowboys practice facility, officials at the Texans front office are looking into the safety of their practice bubble.

“Depending on what the winds and the weather reports are, we’ve got our procedures in place. I’m sure the Cowboys did as well,” said Texans General Manager Rick Smith. “It’ll give us pause to revisit those procedures and make sure we are as safe as possible.’

One of those safety measures includes deflating the bubble, which is what happened, as Hurricane Ike approached in September 2008.

The Texans practice bubble is a totally different structure than the Cowboys practice facility.

Unlike the Cowboy’s structure, there is no steel or wood framing. It’s supported only by air and re-enforced by cables.

The manufacturer says it surpasses the local building codes for wind protection.
http://www.khou.com/sports/texans/stories/khou090504_mp_texans-bubble.1ce2a27e.html

Yes, the Texans deflate the bubble when there's a threat of a hurricane, which can be days in advance, but what about severe thunderstorms that can produce tornadoes, microburts, etc. which can pop up at a moment's notice?

CloakNNNdagger
05-11-2009, 07:06 PM
If this is even what hit the complex, microbursts are produced only within significant thunderstorm conditions, not during routine rain conditions. There were severe thunderstorm warnings at the time along with a tornado "watch" in effect. Lightening was reported in the area. Just the type of "temporary" structure that I would want to run into to seek refuge from these circumstances. And with a metal support structure, electrocution especially of some of the personel stationed in the metal rafters, this could have been much worse. I, for one, would rather go out and fly a kite with a metal key attached to it.

BTW, most historians document that Ben Franklin new that his proposed "experiment" was dangerous and found other ways to prove his lightning=electricity theory in other safe ways. There was a Russian professor, though, who took his writings literally.........actually performed the experiment shortly after reading about it...........and fried like a fish without the benefit of oil or batter.

Texan_Bill
05-11-2009, 07:09 PM
If this is even what hit the complex, microbursts are produced only within significant thunderstorm conditions, not during routine rain conditions. There were severe thunderstorm warnings at the time along with a tornado "watch" in effect. Lightening was reported in the area. Just the type of "temporary" structure that I would want to run into to seek refuge from these circumstances. And with a metal support structure, electrocution especially of some of the personel stationed in the metal rafters, this could have been much worse. I, for one, would rather go out and fly a kite with a metal key attached to it.

BTW, most historians document that Ben Franklin new that his proposed "experiment" was dangerous and found other ways to prove his lightning=electricity theory in other safe ways. There was a Russian professor, though, who took his writings literally.........actually performed the experiment shortly after reading about it...........and fried like a fish without the benefit of oil or batter.

lol: That's not only funny, but a funny way to put it!!

CloakNNNdagger
05-14-2009, 08:04 AM
Cowboys Owner Speaks On Silence Regarding Facility Collapse (http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/05/14/cowboys-owner-speaks-on-silence-regarding-facility-collapse/)
Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, after more than a week of silence, has explained the reasons for the team’s decision to say nothing about the events of May 2, when the team’s indoor practice facility collapsed during a thunderstorm.

According to Mac Engel of the Fort Worth Star-Telgram, Jones gave three reasons for the decision not to speak: (1) the team wants the investigation to be completed; (2) the team wants to minimize the coverage out of respect to employees who are still traumatized by the incident; and (3) legal reasons.

The first two sound good. The third reason is the one that’s driving the bus.

The Cowboys face at least three legal fronts here. They want to be able to preserve their rights against Summit Structures, which designed and built the facility. Also, the Cowboys are hoping to avoid any fines or public admonition from governmental agencies responsible for protecting those who might be injured in such circumstances.

And the Cowboys also need to be thinking about their own potential exposure — especially in light of reports that the team was listed as the general contractor for 2008 work on the building.

One Texas lawyer who reads PFT when he otherwise should be billing time to a client (or, as the case may be, when he is) tells us that the Cowboys might have jeopardized their immunity from liability to the injured employees by acting as the general contractor for the replacement of the structure’s covering.

Like most states, Texas has a workers’ compensation system that pays benefits to injured employees on a no-fault basis while insulating the employer from a lawsuit. But if the Cowboys stepped outside their role as employer and played a role in events that caused or contributed to the collapse of the facility, there’s a chance that the Cowboys could be exposed.

So the prudent approach for now is, indeed, silence.

Of course, that doesn’t stop individual Cowboys employees from talking. Said linebacker DeMarcus Ware: “I thought, ‘If you build a building for the weather, shouldn’t it hold up against the weather? It was really a disaster.”

Ware should put a sock in it. Or, if he can't find a sock, take out his butt plug and place it where more appropriate.:shades:

Wolf
06-12-2009, 11:43 AM
Friday, June 12, 2009

DALLAS — The Dallas Cowboys knew when they hired Summit Structures LLC to build their now-ruined practice facility that a similar fabric structure built by the company for the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority had collapsed in a storm, according to a port official.

Greg Iannarelli, the port authority's chief counsel, said he was contacted by Cowboys official Bruce Mays not long after a warehouse built by Summit for the port collapsed during a snowstorm in February 2003. Iannarelli said the Cowboys were considering using Summit and were concerned.

"My recollection is they wanted to know what happened, and we weren't sure at the time," he said.

Summit, based in Allentown, Pa., received permission from the City of Irving to begin construction on the Cowboys' facility in July 2003.

The 88,000-square-foot building fell in high winds last month, leaving a scouting assistant paralyzed from the waist down and injuring 11 others less severely.

Iannarelli said he had several other conversations with Mays, the Cowboys director of football operations, over the next three years.

He said he sent Mays a copy of a Philadelphia judge's decision in December 2006 stating that the warehouse's collapse was due to design flaws.


http://www.statesman.com/sports/content/sports/stories/other/2009/06/12/0612cowboys.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=54

CloakNNNdagger
06-28-2009, 09:44 AM
A follow up for those who might be interested. "Prophetic" internal memos surface.

Negligence lawsuit builder lost in Philadelphia sheds light on Dallas Cowboys facility collapse (http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/062809dnprocollapse.4187ba1.html).