PDA

View Full Version : Stallworth Hits & Kills Pedestrian


texasguy346
03-14-2009, 03:16 PM
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. – Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte Stallworth hit and killed a pedestrian with his Bentley Saturday morning on a busy causeway linking Miami and Miami Beach, police said.
Stallworth was headed toward the beach when he hit a 49-year-old man around 7 a.m., said Miami Beach police spokesman Juan Sanchez. The unidentified pedestrian was taken to a nearby trauma center, where he was pronounced dead about an hour later. He was near a crosswalk but it's not clear if he was crossing legally.
Stallworth, 28, was cooperating and no charges have been filed, Sanchez said. Officers drew blood to test for drugs or alcohol, which is routine, but police said it was too early to tell if Stallworth was impaired or violating traffic laws. Police would not say where he was coming from or where he was headed.

link (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090314/ap_on_sp_fo_ne/fbn_stallworth_pedestrian_killed)

gary
03-14-2009, 03:39 PM
You beat me to it this is sad only time will tell if he was drinking or on drugs at the time.

Maddict5
03-14-2009, 05:19 PM
any update on the damage to the bentley?

Maddict5
03-14-2009, 05:20 PM
on j/king (although i know somebody died)..

hopefully it was just a bad accident

hot pickle
03-14-2009, 06:12 PM
wouldnt be suprised if the guy didnt use the cross walk i see it all the time sometime people are bound to get hit

ledzeppelin229
03-14-2009, 06:40 PM
7 in the morning makes it seems kind of unlikely that he was influenced on anything, but you never know. But like dunta23 said a lot of people don't really use their head when crossing the street...

CloakNNNdagger
03-15-2009, 09:37 AM
PROSECUTORS POISED TO CHARGE STALLWORTH WITH DUI
Posted by Mike Florio on March 14, 2009, 6:47 p.m.

As authorities in South Florida wait for the results of a blood draw performed on Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth, a source with knowledge of the investigation tells us that prosecutors are preparing an indictment for DUI manslaughter, under the assumption that the results will show that Stallworth’s blood alcohol content exceeded the legal limit of 0.08 percent when he collided with a pedestrian, who later died.

Per the source, Stallworth admitted to drinking at least four Patrons and two Margaritas. A separate source called that information “basically right,” but added that Stallworth contends he had his last drink at midnight. The incident occurred after 7:00 a.m. local time.

We’re also told that Stallworth claimed in his statement to police that he saw the man crossing the street from a distance, and flashed the high beams and honked the horn of the Bentley he was driving. Apparently, there’s an issue as to whether Stallworth could have taken evasive action because of a barrier along the median.

We’re told that Stallworth is badly shaken by the news that the pedestrian had died.

And, frankly, he should be. Apart from the fact that he was involved in an accident that claimed a man’s life, Stallworth could be facing serious criminal liability, if the pending test reveals an impermissibly high concentration of alcohol in his blood.

Vinny
03-15-2009, 10:33 AM
pretty arrogant to honk the horn and hit the brights and then run over the dude. This won't end well for Stallworth at all.

hot pickle
03-15-2009, 11:42 AM
well at least hes cooperating

awtysst
03-15-2009, 12:02 PM
pretty arrogant to honk the horn and hit the brights and then run over the dude. This won't end well for Stallworth at all.

See that's the thing that jumped out at me too. He honked his horn and flashed his bright lights. If he had time to do all that, shouldn't he have the time to hit his brakes?

gary
03-15-2009, 12:57 PM
When will they get the test results?

ledzeppelin229
03-15-2009, 01:20 PM
pretty arrogant to honk the horn and hit the brights and then run over the dude. This won't end well for Stallworth at all.

Agree there. I tried to give him the benefit of the doubt but that part is pretty damning, with or without the toxicity test.

Specnatz
03-15-2009, 02:10 PM
prosecutors are preparing an indictment for DUI manslaughter, under the assumption that the results will show that Stallworth’s blood alcohol content exceeded the legal limit

So much for the your innocent until proven guilty part of the law. You know what happens who you ASSume right?

From a distance? 100 yards 200 yards? What is from a distance?

at 70 mph it is going to take approximately 1025 Feet to stop. That is with 1 second reaction time which is normal from what I was reading.

I have tried to find pics of the causeway but I have no idea what I am looking for, I will ask a friend who used to live that way what the speed limit is and how big of a road is it.

http://criticalmiami.com/images/54.gif

You can find an article on stopping here.

http://www.ask.com/bar?q=Stopping+Distances+for+Vehicles&page=1&qsrc=6&ab=0&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.csgnetwork.com%2Fstopdistinfo.h tml

CloakNNNdagger
03-15-2009, 03:51 PM
So much for the your innocent until proven guilty part of the law. You know what happens who you ASSume right?

From a distance? 100 yards 200 yards? What is from a distance?

at 70 mph it is going to take approximately 1025 Feet to stop. That is with 1 second reaction time which is normal from what I was reading.

I have tried to find pics of the causeway but I have no idea what I am looking for, I will ask a friend who used to live that way what the speed limit is and how big of a road is it.

http://criticalmiami.com/images/54.gif

You can find an article on stopping here.

http://www.ask.com/bar?q=Stopping+Distances+for+Vehicles&page=1&qsrc=6&ab=0&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.csgnetwork.com%2Fstopdistinfo.h tml


Here is a sad article that relates more details about the victim. [LINK (http://www.miamiherald.com/sports/football/story/949618.html)]

BTW, this causeway is a 6-lane thoroughfare with a curbed wide median with grass and planted palm trees, or concrete buttress divider. The outer lanes are wider to accomodate parked sightseers. The speed limit is 50 mph.

CloakNNNdagger
03-15-2009, 04:11 PM
Macarthur Causeway

http://images.world66.com/ma/ca/rt/macarthur_causeway_galleryfull

http://www.southeastroads.com/florida001/fl-a1a_nb_ramp_after_us-001_downtown_miami.jpg

http://www.southeastroads.com/florida001/fl-a1a_nb_macarthur_causeway_04.jpg

Specnatz
03-15-2009, 06:22 PM
Here is a sad article that relates more details about the victim. [LINK]

BTW, this causeway is a 6-lane thoroughfare with a curbed wide median with grass and planted palm trees, or concrete buttress divider. The outer lanes are wider to accomodate parked sightseers. The speed limit is 50 mph.

Link not working.

OK how in the hell did he hit the guy; or more importantly how in the hell do you get hit by a car there unless you are trying to get hit?

CloakNNNdagger
03-15-2009, 08:14 PM
Specnatz, I corrected the link in my initial post........sorry.

rmartin65
03-15-2009, 08:41 PM
I smell a trade to the Bengals...

Specnatz
03-15-2009, 09:36 PM
Specnatz, I corrected the link in my initial post........sorry.

I like how they bolded Past trouble making it seem like he is Pac-Man versus having a minor dispute with police in March of '06 and was not prosecuted, three Freaking years ago.

I am not defending Stallworth but the papers are portraying him in a bad way that is not fair and the Prosecuters are releasing stuff that puts him in a bad light without having all the facts.

mattieuk
03-16-2009, 06:42 AM
I like how they bolded Past trouble making it seem like he is Pac-Man versus having a minor dispute with police in March of '06 and was not prosecuted, three Freaking years ago.

I am not defending Stallworth but the papers are portraying him in a bad way that is not fair and the Prosecuters are releasing stuff that puts him in a bad light without having all the facts.

Guilty until proven innocent, its how the media like things...

Sounds like a terrible incident, I hope its nothing more than a tragic accident, but either way, someone has lost their life, and that is terrible, but there is no need to start a witch-hunt before the facts have even started to be revealed.

CloakNNNdagger
03-16-2009, 08:29 AM
If this, indeed, is true, it certainly does not bode well for Stallworth :

Sunday’s edition, The Miami Herald reported that a witness to the crash said it appeared that Stallworth drove his Bentley around a stopped vehicle to beat a red light. “I think it looks like to the police that Stallworth wasn’t being careful, at the very least,” a source said.
[LINK] (http://sports-odds.com/american-football/031609-cleveland-browns-donte-stallworth-kills-man-in-car-accident.html)

gary
03-16-2009, 10:31 AM
Not good at all for Stallworth and might be even worse pending those test results.

Specnatz
03-16-2009, 11:24 AM
In Sunday’s edition, The Miami Herald reported that a witness to the crash said it appeared that Stallworth drove his Bentley around a stopped vehicle to beat a red light, fatally striking Reyes. “I think it looks like to the police that Stallworth wasn’t being careful, at the very least,” a source said.

If he is trying to beat a red light, that means the light has not changed yet and the pedestrian is in the middle of the road when he should not be?

Am I reading that wrong?

CloakNNNdagger
03-16-2009, 01:08 PM
If he is trying to beat a red light, that means the light has not changed yet and the pedestrian is in the middle of the road when he should not be?

Am I reading that wrong?

Possibly.........if he was "trying" to beat the red light..........and didn't.
We'll just have to see.

CloakNNNdagger
03-16-2009, 01:19 PM
REPORT: CHARGES COMING AGAINST STALLWORTH
Posted by Mike Florio on March 16, 2009, 12:52 p.m.

Apparently, it’s no longer a matter of “if” but “when” as to whether Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth will be arrested in connection with the incident that claimed the life of a pedestrian in Miami on Saturday morning.

According to Jason Cole of Yahoo! Sports, Stallworth is expected to face charges at some point.

Possible charges include driving under the influence, vehicular homicide, and reckless driving.

“The police seem pretty confident that they’re going to charge him,” a source with the NFL told Cole. “Even if he clean, I think the police feel he’s going to be charged with something, regardless.”

We reported on Saturday that prosecutors are preparing to charge Stallworth with DUI manslaughter, if a blood sample shows an illegally high concentration of alcohol. Based, however, on our interpretation of Florida law, it might not matter whether Stallworth was drunk.

If he was driving in a reckless manner, the penalty will be the same.

Under Section 316.193(3)(c)(3)(b) of the Florida Statutes, DUI manslaughter is a second degree felony, which is punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

Under Section 782.071(1)(a) of the Florida Statutes, vehicular homicide also is a second degree felony, again punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

Florida law defines “vehicular homicide” as “the killing of a human being, or the killing of a viable fetus by any injury to the mother, caused by the operation of a motor vehicle by another in a reckless manner likely to cause the death of, or great bodily harm to, another.”

That said, the case against Stallworth becomes much easier if his blood-alcohol concentration exceeded the legal limit. Still, even without evidence of driving under the influence, Stallworth could be facing serious legal consequences even if he was completely sober; as the Miami Herald reported on Sunday night, a witness claims that Stallworth pulled around a stopped car in an effort to get through a red light when the incident occurred.

[UPDATE: [I]A member of the media points out that the Herald story containing the witness account that Stallworth pulled around another car and ran a red light has been removed from the story in which it appeared. Possibly, the Herald applies its “two source” policy to eyewitnesses, too.]

Bottom line? Stallworth was driving the car, and the car struck and killed a man. Absent persuasive evidence that Stallworth was doing nothing wrong — or that the pedestrian was blatantly jaywalking — Stallworth will soon be facing the fight of his life.

Looks like we're still going to need some "unravelling" until a reasonable conclusion to this story occurs.

CloakNNNdagger
03-17-2009, 08:14 AM
Link not working.

OK how in the hell did he hit the guy; or more importantly how in the hell do you get hit by a car there unless you are trying to get hit?


More information was released by the Miami Herald. This accident did not occur in the middle of the causeway (where , had it, your question was appropriately raised), it occurred at one end of the causeway, where the victim was crossing the street to catch a bus home.

The Herald also revealed that the blood test results will probably be available at the end of the week.

gary
03-17-2009, 09:39 AM
The blood test will be intersting.

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 12:46 PM
Miami Herald (http://www.miamiherald.com/news/miami-dade/breaking-news/story/958061.html) today reports:

Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donté Stallworth was driving drunk -- blood alcohol tests showed he was over the legal limit -- last weekend when he struck and killed a pedestrian with his Bentley in Miami Beach, a source with knowledge of the investigation told The Miami Herald.

Miami Beach police would not confirm Stallworth had a blood alcohol above the legal limit.

''We have not released anything regarding the blood work,'' said Jenny Velazquez, a Miami Beach police spokeswoman. ``We're not confirming anything.''

WSVN-Fox reported Thursday afternoon that Stallwroth's blood alcohol level was .12. The legal limit is .08.

HoustonFrog
03-19-2009, 01:40 PM
Miami Herald (http://www.miamiherald.com/news/miami-dade/breaking-news/story/958061.html) today reports:

Another case of a guy with alot of money that refuses to get a driver. I know regular joes that have a towncar when they know they will be out with friends. Yet these people, with their money, can't be smart.

GP
03-19-2009, 02:10 PM
Stallworth is going away for some jail time. Period. Nobody can kill an innocent man, while driving drunk nonetheless, and get something minor like house arrest. He took a man's life.

(Sigh)

I hope I never fall into the trap of making such a bad decision. Lord knows I did stuff like that a long, long time ago when I was in college. And it's not just an alcohol thing. What about someone texting while driving? What about bending down to grab a 32 oz. cup of Dr. Pepper, or to grab something off your car floor, and you dang sure didn't see the last 50 feet that you traveled during that time?

The rookie symposium on avoiding jail time and negative publicity is not doing a good job. There needs to be remedial courses for the few who think they are 10-feet tall and bullet-proof. And it's not a black/white thing, either. Jeff Reed needs that class. Mike Vanderjacht (kicker from Indy) needed that class.

They ought to do a simulation for those who get into minor trouble (drunk and beating up a towel machine, for example), where a policeman arrests them, books them, and they have fake journalists who crowd them down at the station shoving mics into their faces. Make 'em sit in solitary confinement over night, and bring them a fake/fabricated newspaper the next day that has an article about their trial, lost endorsements, salary, life, freedom, etc.

The same thing with teenage boys and girls. Want them to abstain from sex? Make them work in pre-school for three months, all day long, where they have to clean noses, change poopie diapers, put up with the kids' whining and crying, temper tantrums, and preparing their meals, cleaning up after them, every day for 3 months. I know a lot of boys and girls who wouldn't see casual sex the same way again.

But the normal rookie "Hey, don't screw up" symposium? Not so sure it's cutting the mustard. And I realize that maybe there's a larger number of rookies that DO get their heads screwed on a bit better via the rookie "Hey, don't waste your opportunity" symposium. But still...I say grab the minor offenders and run them through the ringer a little.

TexanAddict
03-19-2009, 03:49 PM
Don't think it matters if he has a good :d: attorney he will be going to :jail:

Errant Hothy
03-19-2009, 03:52 PM
He won't be in jail for very long, using Leonard Little as a measuring stick. Little killed a woman while driving drunk and got 90 days in jail.

gary
03-19-2009, 03:53 PM
The proof is there now.

whiskeyrbl
03-19-2009, 03:56 PM
So what is the jail time for vehicular homicide/DUI ? 10...15...20 years?

Hardcore Texan
03-19-2009, 04:04 PM
He won't be in jail for very long, using Leonard Little as a measuring stick. Little killed a woman while driving drunk and got 90 days in jail.

I have never heard this before, that's just downright disgusting. How does someone get off that easy? If it was you or I we would be locked for at least a decade.

Errant Hothy
03-19-2009, 04:16 PM
So what is the jail time for vehicular homicide/DUI ? 10...15...20 years?

I'd be shocked if Stallworth got more then 6 months of jail time.

I have never heard this before, that's just downright disgusting. How does someone get off that easy? If it was you or I we would be locked for at least a decade.

Yup.

scourge
03-19-2009, 04:18 PM
Like Hoth-Boy said, if anything like Little, could be just 3 months...


lame. I believe it should be a decade minimum.

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 04:20 PM
So what is the jail time for vehicular homicide/DUI ? 10...15...20 years?

Up to 15 big ones in Florida.

Texan_Bill
03-19-2009, 04:21 PM
I have never heard this before, that's just downright disgusting. How does someone get off that easy? If it was you or I we would be locked for at least a decade.

What would you say if I told you that 6 years later he was arrested again on suspicion of drunk driving and speeding?










Don't get too worked up, he was acquitted of the second DWI.

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 04:23 PM
Like Hoth-Boy said, if anything like Little, could be just 3 months...


lame. I believe it should be a decade minimum.

Six years later, after the involuntary manslaughter conviction was wiped from his record, Little was again arrested for drunk driving.

Texan_Bill
03-19-2009, 04:27 PM
What would you say if I told you that 6 years later he was arrested again on suspicion of drunk driving and speeding?










Don't get too worked up, he was acquitted of the second DWI.

Six years later, after the involuntary manslaughter conviction was wiped from his record, Little was again arrested for drunk driving.


:foottap:


How have you been?

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 04:29 PM
Like Hoth-Boy said, if anything like Little, could be just 3 months...


lame. I believe it should be a decade minimum.

Hopefully, the more lax vehicular homicide laws in California accounted in part:


If felony DUI vehicular manslaughter (but without gross negligence) is found, the sentence can be up to four years in state prison. If felony DUI vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence is found, the court can impose up to 10 years state prison. Substantial drivers license suspensions may also be imposed.

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 04:33 PM
:foottap:


How have you been?

Great......and you??????

BTW, on that 2nd DUI acquital, he was still convicted of SPEEDING (misdemeanor)...........bet that turned him around.:mcnugget:

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 04:40 PM
USA TODAY:

"That has not been released or confirmed by us," Miami Beach detective Juan Sanchez told the Cleveland Plain-Dealer. "They went with that story without confirming it with us.''

Sanchez told the Plain-Dealer that toxicology results are due on Friday. He added, "We will not be releasing those results until we make an arrest."

Am I reading this right? What kind of official statement is this?????:mcnugget:

Errant Hothy
03-19-2009, 04:44 PM
Hopefully, the more lax vehicular homicide laws in California accounted in part:

What's Californa laws got to do with Little?

Little was pulled over both times in St Louis, Missouri.

disaacks3
03-19-2009, 04:45 PM
USA TODAY:

"That has not been released or confirmed by us," Miami Beach detective Juan Sanchez told the Cleveland Plain-Dealer. "They went with that story without confirming it with us.''

Sanchez told the Plain-Dealer that toxicology results are due on Friday. He added, "We will not be releasing those results until we make an arrest."

Am I reading this right? What kind of official statement is this?????:mcnugget:
Did you notice he said UNTIL and not UNLESS?...OOPS!

Texan_Bill
03-19-2009, 04:50 PM
Great......and you??????

BTW, on that 2nd DUI acquital, he was still convicted of SPEEDING (misdemeanor)...........bet that turned him around.:mcnugget:

:spit: I'm sure that misdemeanor speeding conviction put him on the straight and narrow.

Doing fine and certainly much better than I was yesterday on National Hangover Day. :tiphat:

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 05:23 PM
What's Californa laws got to do with Little?

Little was pulled over both times in St Louis, Missouri.


My bad.............I still think of the Rams as an L.A. team. :secret::tomato::tomato:

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 05:28 PM
What's Californa laws got to do with Little?

Little was pulled over both times in St Louis, Missouri.


Little must have pled down........because he was convicted only of involuntary manslaughter (not vehicular homicide), which in Kansas City, Mo. where I grew up, carries only up to 12 months of jail time.

wags
03-19-2009, 06:30 PM
He won't be in jail for very long, using Leonard Little as a measuring stick. Little killed a woman while driving drunk and got 90 days in jail.


You guys are forgetting something else. Little hit and killed the wife of a photographer who covers the Rams. The man kept his job and was taking photos of the guy who killed his wife only months after it happened. His reasoning was something to the effect of why should I let him take my job as well. The man also lost his 7 year old daughter in a car crash in 1980.

Little ran a red light at 46 mph and had a blood alcohol level of .19!! Over twice the legal limit.

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 07:06 PM
STALLWORTH BLOOD TEST RESULTS CONFIRMED
Posted by Mike Florio on March 19, 2009, 7:49 p.m.

There are now three separate reports indicating that Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth had a blood-alcohol concentration about the legal limit when the Bentley he was driving crashed into Mario Reyes, claiming his life.

CBS4 in Miami reports that Stallworth’s blood test generated a BAC reading of 0.14 percent.

Both the Miami Herald and WVSN in Miami have reported that the result was 0.12 percent.

We’ve heard that two samples were taken an hour apart; thus, it could be that the two numbers represent the two different results.

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 07:33 PM
Having been involved in medical forensics, I assure you that if it turns out true that he still blew .14 and/or .12 and his last drink was indeed Midnight, there is no way he only had 7 drinks.................and if he did drink 7 drinks, he must have consumed them all within the hour prior to the accident.

StarStruck
03-19-2009, 09:52 PM
Having been involved in medical forensics, I assure you that if it turns out true that he still blew .14 and/or .12 and his last drink was indeed Midnight, there is no way he only had 7 drinks.................and if he did drink 7 drinks, he must have consumed them all within the hour prior to the accident.

Perhaps someone can solve a mystery that has puzzled me for the last 15 years. A close friend's nephew came to her house drunk about 11 a.m. in the morning. He did not drink at her house, but was stopped by police about 3:00that afternoon suspected as being intoxicated and taken to jail. I went with my friend to bail him out which took place about 11:00 p.m. and she took him straignt to a center that treated alcoholism. At about 1:00 a.m he still tested well above the range to be considered intoxicated and smelled like a distillery.

My question is how long is it possible for a person to remain drunk after a night of drinking. Back in my hayday of the hardy party, I don't recall anyone staying in that state for such a prolonged period of time. Later the nephew died with a illness that many survive a longer period of time, and I was wondering if some people could just be predisposed to react differently to alcohol, drugs, or illness.

Certainly my thoughts are first extended to the man who lost his life the to Stallworth who has probably experienced more mental anguish than he could have ever dreamed. As for myself, I just thank God for seeing me though some stuff that could have had a much different ending during my dumb days. Blessings, counting 1, 2, 3.........

CloakNNNdagger
03-19-2009, 11:52 PM
Perhaps someone can solve a mystery that has puzzled me for the last 15 years. A close friend's nephew came to her house drunk about 11 a.m. in the morning. He did not drink at her house, but was stopped by police about 3:00that afternoon suspected as being intoxicated and taken to jail. I went with my friend to bail him out which took place about 11:00 p.m. and she took him straignt to a center that treated alcoholism. At about 1:00 a.m he still tested well above the range to be considered intoxicated and smelled like a distillery.

My question is how long is it possible for a person to remain drunk after a night of drinking. Back in my hayday of the hardy party, I don't recall anyone staying in that state for such a prolonged period of time. Later the nephew died with a illness that many survive a longer period of time, and I was wondering if some people could just be predisposed to react differently to alcohol, drugs, or illness.

Certainly my thoughts are first extended to the man who lost his life the to Stallworth who has probably experienced more mental anguish than he could have ever dreamed. As for myself, I just thank God for seeing me though some stuff that could have had a much different ending during my dumb days. Blessings, counting 1, 2, 3.........


Many factors may account for prolonged alcohol levels including multiple drinks in a short period of time, weight, race (Asian/American Indian), sex (female), medications (that compete with liver breakdown metabolism such as narcotics, anti-inflammatories, steroid, antihypertensives, depressants [such as Valium/Xanax], cocaine, marijuana), dehydration, liver damage (from chronic drug or alcohol abuse), food ingestion (especially high fat).

TimeKiller
03-20-2009, 07:42 AM
I used to go party and drive home, wake up about 6 and go to work still kinda funny feeling. Honestly, I'm not super proud of it but just saying that you can carry over the intoxication a night and a morning before it really goes away. I don't do that crap anymore because I got rooked by a cop (when I wasn't drunk, go figure...like, 0.00 not drunk) but I'm especially thankful to have never been caught up in something like this.

CloakNNNdagger
03-20-2009, 08:01 AM
One thing I should interject.........blood alcohol content tests have a same day turnaround for results (Remember, the accident occurred last Saturday). Something in addition to alcohol must be suspected. Most drug screen test results can be had within 5 days. Appears the police are just getting all their ducks in a row before taking action that will have a greater likelyhood of sticking.

CloakNNNdagger
03-20-2009, 02:41 PM
Hmmm.........Stallworth's just hired a new attorney. Could it be that Stallworth "can't handle the truth"?

Specnatz
03-21-2009, 03:27 AM
Do not let facts get involved with your posts.

This has been gone over wih a fine tooth comb.

After the speeding conviction Leonard Little was ordered to never drink again.

Then again I am sure that night that the bellair police stopped Rudy Tomjanovich was not drunk either. Rudy was never none to be a drinker at certain clubs.

With that said, the results should put him away but a good lawyer will get you off even if you have a loaded 9mm in your car after having a few drinks, like Scottie Pippen.

threetoedpete
03-21-2009, 03:41 AM
So, I wonder if this guy and Rae Carruth willl be taking showers together ? He gets M.A.D. on his butt...he's gone. I'm surprised he hasn't fled yet....

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1355/is_8_99/ai_70637572

CloakNNNdagger
03-21-2009, 07:51 AM
The Sacramento Bee (http://www.sacbee.com/sports/story/1717895.html) points out an interesting association..........and

Leading Off: It seems Stallworth missed a life lesson


Donte' Stallworth appears not to have learned from others' mistakes.

If the Grant High School product indeed did get behind the wheel of his Bentley with a 0.14 blood alcohol level, as reported by Miami television station WFOR, and fatally struck a man, he'll pay for it, whether through incarceration or spiritual tumult.

Nearly as tragic as the loss of life, however, is that Stallworth might have made such a foolish choice at all. He was a University of Tennessee teammate of former Cowboys defensive back Dwayne Goodrich, who killed two young men in a hit-and-run in January 2003. Goodrich admitted to having imbibed that night but insisted he was not drunk. He was sentenced to 12 1/2 years in prison. Then there's Leonard Little, another Tennessee alumnus who in 1998 pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter after getting drunk, running a red light and killing the 47-year-old mother of a teenage boy. He served only 90 days in jail, four years' probation and 1,000 hours of community service.

But there was a lesson there, and Stallworth missed it. And we don't all have Little's luck.

CloakNNNdagger
03-21-2009, 03:09 PM
PFT reports:

If charged and convicted with DUI manslaughter, Stallworth could face a minimum sentence of four years and a maximum sentence of 15 years.

“DUI manslaughter is a very serious offense,” said Ed Griffith, a spokesman for the Miami-Dade County state attorney.

WesmanTexanfan
03-21-2009, 03:22 PM
such a sad event all around...

CloakNNNdagger
03-24-2009, 07:53 PM
Stallworth's accident report has been released by the police. His blood test results have not.


Officials with the Miami Beach Police Department have releases the 911 calls made to police following the accident involving Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte Stallworth, which left a man dead.

Detective Juan Sanchez tells Fox 8 News, the 911 tapes, and the traffic crash investigation report filed following the accident, were used by investigators to better determine what happened when, according to police, Stallworth hit and killed 59-year-old Mario Reyes while driving his Bentley on a busy causeway the morning of March 14th.

Stallworth, 28, has cooperated with police and no charges have been filed, Sanchez said.

Officers drew blood from Stallworth following the accident to test for drugs or alcohol, which is routine in Miami Beach, but according to Sanchez, the results of the toxicology report are not being made available today.

Sanchez, would not confirm or deny that police have the results of the toxicology tests. But he tells fox 8 News, either way, they would become part of a charging document, if or when, Stallworth is ever charged with a crime. Those results will not be released until that time.

The traffic crash investigation report lists speeding and careless driving as contributing causes for the crash, but does not list drugs or alcohol as contributing causes.

[LINK TO STORY] (http://www.fox8.com/wjw-new-stallworth-911-tapes,0,5000212.story)

Noted in the investigation is that Stallworth was going 50 in a 40 speed zone and that the victim crossed the street just past (but not on) a crosswalk.

Be aware that it is not unusual for alcohol or drug compromise to be left out of initial reports if blood is drawn.

[LINK TO ACTUAL ACCIDENT REPORT] (http://www.fox8.com/extras/wjw/miscfiles/DOC151.PDF)

The saga draws on..........

CloakNNNdagger
04-01-2009, 12:49 PM
AP sources: Stallworth to be charged in Fla. crash
By CURT ANDERSON – 45 minutes ago (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5g-CLeMDPwyX2iShZyyhlE_wWxjlgD979PQUG3)

MIAMI (AP) — Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte Stallworth will be charged with DUI manslaughter after a Miami car crash that killed a pedestrian, according to people familiar with the case.

Two people with knowledge of the case said on condition of anonymity the charges will be filed Wednesday against the 28-year-old Stallworth in the March 14 accident that killed 59-year-old Mario Reyes. They requested anonymity because the charges haven't been announced.

The charge carries a possible 15-year prison sentence.


Remember, it carries a minimum of 4 years.

Texecutioner
04-01-2009, 12:58 PM
If he was going to be charged for being drunk I don't understand why he wasn't charged at the time. He might have had the alcohol still in his system from the night before but not really been dunk and impaired still? Why didn't the police run a bunch of field sobriety tests on Stallworth to see if he was impaired at the time? The alcohol in his system might not have impaired him in the morning to where he drove wrecklessly because of it.

I'm not trying to make any excuses for drunk driving either, but I don't understand why it takes this long to charge a guy on this when the police were right there after it happened and Stallworth cooperated with everything. Couldn't the police have made their determination right then if he was drunk besides waiting for the blood tests. Just because he was drinking the night before, doesn't mean that he was impaired to drive where it caused him to hit the guy. I don't know either way, but it seems a little strange to me.

CloakNNNdagger
04-01-2009, 01:18 PM
If he was going to be charged for being drunk I don't understand why he wasn't charged at the time. He might have had the alcohol still in his system from the night before but not really been dunk and impaired still? Why didn't the police run a bunch of field sobriety tests on Stallworth to see if he was impaired at the time? The alcohol in his system might not have impaired him in the morning to where he drove wrecklessly because of it.

I'm not trying to make any excuses for drunk driving either, but I don't understand why it takes this long to charge a guy on this when the police were right there after it happened and Stallworth cooperated with everything. Couldn't the police have made their determination right then if he was drunk besides waiting for the blood tests. Just because he was drinking the night before, doesn't mean that he was impaired to drive where it caused him to hit the guy. I don't know either way, but it seems a little strange to me.


Blood alcohol levels return within 24 hours. Drug screens take up to 3 weeks to return. The police will many times wait until they have all the results in order to avoid incomplete "interim" charges. (ie., alcohol + or - drug involvement)

Texecutioner
04-01-2009, 01:26 PM
Blood alcohol levels return within 24 hours. Drug screens take up to 3 weeks to return. The police will many times wait until they have all the results in order to avoid incomplete "interim" charges. (ie., alcohol + or - drug involvement)

But my point is that all of that in his system might have been from the night before. He might have felt perfectly fine in the morning but just tired and exhausted. I know that there have been tons of nights where I'm to drunk to drive home or where I feel like i can, but I just crash on someone's couch and wake up at like 7 or 8 in the morning and drive home. Sometimes when I wake up I'm still buzzed and feeling a little nasty from all the alcohol from the night before, but I'm not impaired in any way or drunk at all. If I were to get into a wreck and have to blow into one of those things that tests for the BAL and fail, that would be messed up because I could get a DWI from just an ordinary wreck that had nothing to do with alcohol.

If Stallworth sat there and cooperated with police and answered all questions and took responsibility like was reported, then why weren't their a bunch of sobriety tests done to determine what type of impairment he may have been in? Don't you think the police should have some statements talking about how drunk or staggered Stallworth was?

I mean they're charging this guy with some very serious charges here that could send him to jail for years. I would think that they would have to have really tested the hell out of this guy to see what he could or could not do at the time to see what his condition was like.

Grams
04-01-2009, 01:39 PM
Reports are he blew (or tested) a .12 and a .14 after the accident. Doesn't matter when he stopped drinking, he was over the legal limit at the time of the accident.

Texecutioner
04-01-2009, 01:44 PM
Reports are he blew (or tested) a .12 and a .14 after the accident. Doesn't matter when he stopped drinking, he was over the legal limit at the time of the accident.

That is quite a bit. I just don't know how much can still stay in your system if you sleep it off for a few hours and wake up okay, but still have it in your system.

Grams
04-01-2009, 01:46 PM
He stated he stopped drinking at midnight, but no one knows for a fact. He may have stopped 10 min before he got into his vehicle.

Texecutioner
04-01-2009, 01:49 PM
He stated he stopped drinking at midnight, but no one knows for a fact. He may have stopped 10 min before he got into his vehicle.

Well if he said that, then I don't believe it. Not at 12. I don't think he would still have that high of a level if he stopped at 12.

Joe Texan
04-02-2009, 01:13 AM
http://www.yahoo.com/s/1052109

Napa Auto Parts
04-02-2009, 02:13 AM
i just tought about something:gun: i have not heard even a quarter of outrage to this topic as to michael vick dog fighting and killing dogs how patethic is that a human life was taken away because this man was legally under the influence but we make more of a stink about some stupid dogs.

CloakNNNdagger
04-02-2009, 11:52 AM
The Miami Herald (http://www.miamiherald.com/416/story/980710.html)that Stallworth submitted bond immediately upon surrendering today.

Conditions of Stallworth's bond, detailed in court documents, will allow him to live in Florida and Ohio.

Before traveling between the two places, he must tell the court. For other travel, he has to get permission.

He cannot have alcohol and he will be subject to random drug and alcohol testing through the National Football League's program for substance abuse.

He also will have a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m. and will not be able to drive.

HoustonFrog
04-02-2009, 12:40 PM
Well if he said that, then I don't believe it. Not at 12. I don't think he would still have that high of a level if he stopped at 12.

Actually there is some word now that he was actually leaving a club and coming home late. So he had been drinking pretty close to the incident I believe.

Also, with Florida's comparative negligence laws there is some talk that he might only get the DUI due to the fact that the guy was crossing a busy 4 lane road and wasn't at a crosswalk. The DA has to prove that the BAC contributed to the accident and the death. So the man's jaywalking could help save him if it is shown...basically..that someone with a 0.0 may have gotten into the same accident.

http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/04/02/stallworth-team-hoping-for-dui-charges-only/

The media still isn’t focusing on the distinction between the Thursday booking of Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth on charges of DUI manslaughter and the eventual decision by prosecutors to charge him with DUI manslaughter.

On Wednesday, a member of Stallworth’s legal team stressed to us that, in this case, there’s a significant potential difference.

As we now understand it, the significant potential difference was/is that prosecutors could ultimately decide not to charge Stallworth with DUI manslaughter, but to charge him only with DUI.

The key here is the precise language of Section 316.193(3)(c)(3)(b) of the Florida Statutes. A person who is driving while drunk doesn’t commit DUI manslaughter simply by driving drunk and being involved in an accident resulting in another person’s death. To be liable for DUI manslaughter, the drunk driver also must have caused or contributed to the causation of the incident.

The DUI laws impose strict liability on the driver. Even if the driver is not actually impaired, he’s deemed to be intoxicated as a matter of law if his blood alcohol concentration exceeds the legal limit.

For DUI manslaughter in Florida, there’s no strict liability. The prosecution must prove — beyond a reasonable doubt — that the driver caused or contributed to the causation of the collison.

The key, as it always is in criminal cases, is reasonable doubt.

Experts in accident reconstruction can readily testify as to the reality that, as in this case, a man jaywalking in a multiple-lane highway with a posted speed limit of 40 miles per hour might very well have been struck by Stallworth even if his BAC had been 0.0 percent.

If the expert is good — and there are plenty of them out there – he or she could to inject more than enough reasonable doubt into the question of whether Stallworth’s driving actually caused the collision.

As a result, prosecutors might decide not to spend the time and money necessary to prosecute Stallworth for DUI manslaughter.

It’s a decision that will be driven by many factors, and apparently those factors will still be weighed and assessed over the next few weeks, despite the fact that Stallworth will formally appear in Court today to answer to the preliminary charges that the police have filed against him.

Texecutioner
04-02-2009, 12:55 PM
The DA has to prove that the BAC contributed to the accident and the death. So the man's jaywalking could help save him if it is shown...basically..that someone with a 0.0 may have gotten into the same accident.

http://www.profootballtalk.com/2009/04/02/stallworth-team-hoping-for-dui-charges-only/

That has been the thing that I have wondered about the entire time. If the guy wasn't in a cross walk, maybe anyone could have hit the guy. I know that i have foolishly walked in front of cars plenty of times and almost been hit and there have been times where I almost hit people as well from them being stupid. Hell, I almost hit a bum just about every single day I drive. I hate when those Aholes are standing around in the middle of lanes trying to collect free money.

CloakNNNdagger
04-02-2009, 01:58 PM
By definition, the BAC limit is set to establish the criteria of disfunctionality. In addition, if indeed, it was establish that he was going 50 in a 40, the prosecution's burden of showing "contribution" through poor judgement and "under the influence" will have been met.

drewmar74
04-02-2009, 02:03 PM
Yet another incident where I'm left shaking my head and wondering why, with all the money that Mr. Stallworth has, he didn't just catch a cab. Or a limo. Or call a friend.

The whole thing is rather senseless and tragic.

Texecutioner
04-02-2009, 02:08 PM
Yet another incident where I'm left shaking my head and wondering why, with all the money that Mr. Stallworth has, he didn't just catch a cab. Or a limo. Or call a friend.

The whole thing is rather senseless and tragic.

Yeah, but what if he didn't feel drunk and buzzed hardly and felt like he could dive just fine and was driving at a pretty good speed where the guy irresponsibly got in his way and he could move on time? He wasn't in the cross walk.

drewmar74
04-02-2009, 02:09 PM
Yeah, but what if he didn't feel drunk and buzzed hardly and felt like he could dive just fine and was driving at a pretty good speed where the guy irresponsibly got in his way and he could move on time? He wasn't in the cross walk.

Didn't feel drunk at a .12 or a .14? I don't buy that.

CloakNNNdagger
04-03-2009, 08:38 AM
Stallworth linked to past woes
Report: He was part of abuse program in '07 (http://www.cleveland.com/browns/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/sports/123874768733620.xml&coll=2)
Friday, April 03, 2009

Browns receiver Donté Stallworth was already in the NFL's substance-abuse program before being charged with DUI manslaughter, according to a report, meaning he most likely would face stiffer sanctions from the NFL if convicted.

In March 2007, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported that Stallworth was a participant in the league's substance-abuse program and faced a suspension if he violated the conditions again. Asked about the report a week later when he signed with the Patriots, Stallworth told the Associated Press, "All that stuff is in the past. There was a situation a couple years ago. There's nothing now that's going on that will affect me preparing for helping this team."

Wolf
05-21-2009, 12:13 PM
Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte’ Stallworth(notes) could avoid a DUI manslaughter conviction from the March 14 accident that killed a Miami man even if he is found to have been impaired while driving, according to two NFL sources and two Florida-based attorneys.

Stallworth, who is scheduled to be arraigned Thursday, may still have to serve time in jail and reach a civil settlement with the family of Mario Reyes, who was killed when Stallworth hit him in the early morning hours of March 14. However, Stallworth’s jail time could be only a matter of two or three months rather than the possibility of up to 15 years in prison under state law, two NFL sources said this week. Beyond that, Stallworth could play this season, one of the sources said.

According to Florida’s DUI manslaughter law, there are exceptions under what is called “causation” of an accident. In short, someone who is driving drunk and causes an accident is not necessarily responsible if the other party did something to contribute to the accident. Florida statute 316.119 was changed in the 1980s to reflect that after a state Supreme Court judge ruled that the state’s previous strict liability standard on drunken drivers was essentially unfair.

The exception is based on the idea that if a drunken driver stopped at an intersection was hit by another car and the driver of the other car died, the drunken driver should not be held responsible.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=jc-stallworth052109&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

HoustonFrog
06-16-2009, 08:05 AM
Stallworth Pleads Guilty and will serve some time

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4261769

MIAMI -- Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte' Stallworth has agreed to plead guilty to a DUI manslaughter charge and would do some jail time for a Miami car crash in which a pedestrian was struck and killed, authorities said Monday.

Stallworth, 28, is scheduled to appear Tuesday in a Miami courtroom to enter the plea. If accepted by Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Dennis Murphy, Stallworth would serve a short jail sentence for the March 14 crash, followed by lengthy probation and numerous conditions, Terry Chavez, spokeswoman for the Miami-Dade State Attorney's Office, told The Associated Press.

Miami Beach police said Stallworth was drinking at a bar in the swank Fountainebleu hotel. He left to go to a nearby home -- he owns three properties in the Miami area -- and then headed out in his black 2005 Bentley on MacArthur Causeway, which links the beach to downtown Miami.

Prosecutors say Stallworth hit 59-year-old Mario Reyes, a construction crane operator who was rushing to catch a bus after finishing his shift around 7:15 a.m. Stallworth told police he flashed his lights in an attempt to warn Reyes, who was not in a crosswalk when he was struck.

Chavez said Reyes' family has been pushing hard to resolve the case.

"We have been in intense negotiations for the past couple of days," Chavez said. "We always take the victim's wishes into account."

Stallworth had faced up to 15 years in prison on the DUI manslaughter charge, but the plea deal calls for far less time. Chavez would not provide details on the penalties, nor would Stallworth attorney Christopher Lyons.

CloakNNNdagger
06-16-2009, 09:37 AM
Frog, wouldn't the family be pushing for the resolution of the criminal phase, especially with the conclusion of "DUI manslaughter" plea, in order to clear the way for a civil lawsuit/settlement? The family has lost it's husband and father and probably it's only means of support.

HoustonFrog
06-16-2009, 10:26 AM
Frog, wouldn't the family be pushing for the resolution of the criminal phase, especially with the conclusion of "DUI manslaughter" plea, in order to clear the way for a civil lawsuit/settlement? The family has lost it's husband and father and probably it's only means of support.

They could be. Lately it seems that I've read more and more wrongful death civil suits are happening when a family was either wronged criminally(OJ style) or the family isn't satisfied because the prosecutors aren't sure they have enough evidence to go forward.(just had a case on 48 Hours where this happened because the family wanted the guy to pay and they wanted to get facts out there.) So getting this through wouldn't stop them from going through with a civil suit and being successful but having it in the books definitely helps get to that point quicker.

hobie
06-16-2009, 11:57 AM
From what ESPN is saying, he's doing 30 days, 10 yrs. probation and 1,000 hours of community service...plus a financial settlement as well, but of course that wasn't given..
Must be nice to have enough money to be able to be able to pay your way out of trouble..

gtexan02
06-16-2009, 12:13 PM
From what it sounds like, the family was content with an apology and a big check. They pushed this through quickly in order to have it resolved

HoustonFrog
06-16-2009, 12:23 PM
From what ESPN is saying, he's doing 30 days, 10 yrs. probation and 1,000 hours of community service...plus a financial settlement as well, but of course that wasn't given..
Must be nice to have enough money to be able to be able to pay your way out of trouble..

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4262751

MIAMI -- Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte' Stallworth took full responsibility for killing a pedestrian while driving drunk in Florida and began serving a 30-day jail sentence Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to DUI manslaughter.

Stallworth also reached a confidential financial settlement to avoid a potential lawsuit from the family of 59-year-old Mario Reyes, according to Stallworth attorney Christopher Lyons. Reyes was struck and killed March 14 by Stallworth, who was driving his black 2005 Bentley after a night drinking at a swanky hotel bar.

hobie
06-16-2009, 01:05 PM
From what it sounds like, the family was content with an apology and a big check. They pushed this through quickly in order to have it resolved

I guess it's easier to accept an apology when a big check is being handed to you..

Texaninlild
06-16-2009, 02:54 PM
Are f'ing kidding me????????? 30 days for this guy.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AhMw._WwKwseotDjUA_EwB05nYcB?slug=ap-stallworth-pedestriankilled&prov=ap&type=lgns

CloakNNNdagger
06-16-2009, 03:09 PM
Are f'ing kidding me????????? 30 days for this guy.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AhMw._WwKwseotDjUA_EwB05nYcB?slug=ap-stallworth-pedestriankilled&prov=ap&type=lgns

What.........disappointed he didn't get 31 days????????:sarcasm:

Carr Bombed
06-16-2009, 03:50 PM
To be fair the guy he hit was walking in the middle of the road......there's still no excuse, but people also shouldn't be in the middle of the road.

CloakNNNdagger
06-16-2009, 05:59 PM
Stallworth Already Is In Custody

A press release issued by the Miami-Dade prosecutor states that Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth already has been taken into custody, and that his 30-day sentence resulting from a guilty plea to DUI manslaughter already has commenced.

“Every case that we prosecute, especially those that involve the death of a human being, is closely scrutinized to ensure that a fair and just resolution is reached for all parties,” said prosecutor Katherine Fernandez Rundle. “We have specifically looked at the unique facts involved with this charge, Mr. Stallworth’s excellent pre-incident history of community service, abundant references that attest to his good character, his lack of any traffic violations or criminal convictions, his full and complete post-incident cooperation with law enforcement, and his willingness to accept complete responsibility for his actions.

“For all of these reasons, a just resolution of this case has been reached,” Ms. Rundle added. “The terms of the plea have been agreed upon between the State Attorney’s office and the police, and has been extended with the full endorsement and consent of the Reyes family, who believe that this plea and its timing are in the best interest of their 15-year-old daughter, the sole remaining child of Mario Reyes. Although no sentence can ever restore Mr. Reyes to his family, the provisions of this plea will provide closure to them and appropriate punishment for Mr. Stallworth’s conduct and the effects of his actions that night.”

In addition to the prison term, two years of house arrest, and eight years of probation, Stallworth’s sentence includes the following terms: a $2,500 donation to Mothers Against Drunk Driving; a $2,500 donation to Parents of Murdered Children; and a lifetime forfeiture of his driver’s license.

No mention of restitution to the family. Therefore, I suspect there will be a civil proceeding/settlement that ensues fairly quickly.

Licenses, I believe, can only be revoked per the individual state. I believe that most states (including Florida and Ohio) have reciprocal agreements for violations and revocations. But some states do not. Therefore, can he seek a drivers license in one of those states. Anyone want to clarify??

Fox
06-16-2009, 09:34 PM
This is really frustrating. He drinks, drives, and kills someone and he has to spend 30 days in jail. Really?

Would he only have to spend 15 days if he ran the guy over sober?

Grams
06-16-2009, 09:57 PM
"The key to this one, however, surely was the money he’s paying to the victim’s family. Our guess is that it falls somewhere between $2 million and $5 million. And that it’s closer to $5 million.

UPDATE: Stallworth also will be placed on two years of house arrest."

http://www.profootballtalk.com/category/rumor-mill/

If Vick cannot play football while on "house arrest", it seems unlikely that Stallworth will be able to play while he is on "house arrest" for 2 years.

He needs to be suspended till he has served his time, then suspended for an additional 12 months.

One of these days these guys will learn that if you have enough money to be driving a Bentley, you should be able to afford someone to drive you home when you have been drinking. Now he gets to sell his Bentley and have someone drive him around all the time.

StarStruck
06-17-2009, 12:14 AM
"The key to this one, however, surely was the money he’s paying to the victim’s family. Our guess is that it falls somewhere between $2 million and $5 million. And that it’s closer to $5 million.

UPDATE: Stallworth also will be placed on two years of house arrest."

http://www.profootballtalk.com/category/rumor-mill/

If Vick cannot play football while on "house arrest", it seems unlikely that Stallworth will be able to play while he is on "house arrest" for 2 years.

He needs to be suspended till he has served his time, then suspended for an additional 12 months.

One of these days these guys will learn that if you have enough money to be driving a Bentley, you should be able to afford someone to drive you home when you have been drinking. Now he gets to sell his Bentley and have someone drive him around all the time.


Let's see! Three years should be sufficient time to insure that he never returns to the NFL, right?

If the guy is driving under the influence, the problem is DUI, therefore, the type of car that he is driving shouldn't make any difference. If his driving killed a man, I'm sure he would have still died if Stallworth had been driving a Ford Focus. Is there a reason why he gets to sell his Bentely as opposed to any other vehicle? It isn't the Bentley that caused the accident.

I was listening at the local news tonight and found it interested that the newscaster said the Stallworth killed a man who was "waiting" on his bus. I am opposed to DUI under any circumstance, and believe the punishment would and should have been more severe if the pedestrian would not have tried crossing the street without the benefit of a traffic light or having the right of way.

Carr Bombed
06-17-2009, 12:28 AM
Would he only have to spend 15 days if he ran the guy over sober?

If he was sober he wouldn't of even been charge with a crime since the guy ran out infront of his car.

Grams
06-17-2009, 06:04 AM
Let's see! Three years should be sufficient time to insure that he never returns to the NFL, right?

If the guy is driving under the influence, the problem is DUI, therefore, the type of car that he is driving shouldn't make any difference. If his driving killed a man, I'm sure he would have still died if Stallworth had been driving a Ford Focus. Is there a reason why he gets to sell his Bentely as opposed to any other vehicle? It isn't the Bentley that caused the accident.

I was listening at the local news tonight and found it interested that the newscaster said the Stallworth killed a man who was "waiting" on his bus. I am opposed to DUI under any circumstance, and believe the punishment would and should have been more severe if the pedestrian would not have tried crossing the street without the benefit of a traffic light or having the right of way.

The point was he has enough money to buy a Bentley, means he had enough money to hire a cab to take him home after drinking. He has supposedly lost his driver's license forever so will not be able to drive anything anymore. He had enough time to honk his horn and flash his lights, if he was not drunk he probably could have stopped before he ran him over.

It was supposed to be a mandatory 4 year sentence in Florida for DUI Manslaugther? The rest of us would had had to serve the time, his money and status gets him 30 days. 2 years of house arrest means nothing if he gets to play football.

Texans_Chick
06-17-2009, 07:42 AM
My legal analysis of this:

Stallworth Resolves Criminal and Civil Claims (What Does This Mean?) (http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2009/06/16/stallworth-resolves-criminal-and-civil-claims-what-does-this-me/)

Texans_Chick
06-17-2009, 07:44 AM
It was supposed to be a mandatory 4 year sentence in Florida for DUI Manslaugther? The rest of us would had had to serve the time, his money and status gets him 30 days. 2 years of house arrest means nothing if he gets to play football.


Reason he got a deal was because the prosecution would have had a hard time proving DUI Manslaughter.

Celeb status doesn't necessarily help you in a criminal case--it works for and against you.

Best way to be a criminal defendant is to be an anonymous rich guy.

CloakNNNdagger
06-17-2009, 09:53 AM
My legal analysis of this:

Stallworth Resolves Criminal and Civil Claims (What Does This Mean?) (http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2009/06/16/stallworth-resolves-criminal-and-civil-claims-what-does-this-me/)

Steph,

I dug up this March 2007 article on Stallworth when he signed with the Pats that you and others may find interesting as a "backgrounder." :


New England continued its busy offseason by agreeing to terms with wide receiver Donte' Stallworth on a detailed six-year contract that could be worth as much as $33.1 million or as little as $3.6 million for one season.

The complex nature of the contract reflects the fact that Stallworth is currently in the NFL substance abuse program, according to a report by the Philadelphia Inquirer. Another violation of the program could result in a suspension.
REST OF ARTICLE (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=jc-stallworth031107&prov=yhoo&type=lgns)

My gut feeling is that if you're already in "The Program" and have serious implications hanging over your head, and still screw up, you're unlikely to make it through 10 years of probation without the same results. I have a feeling the prosecutors also had that in mind in offering this "deal." There are probably very severe provisions written into this agreed upon plea bargain which could more than make up for the apparent leniency extended, should Stallworth screw up again.

Another thing I wanted to point out is that others are already trying to use the apparent inequities of the penal system in arguments for their clients.

Plaxico Burress' lawyer argues for Donte Stallworth-like sentence or less (http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/giants/2009/06/17/2009-06-17_plaxico_burress_lawyer_argues_for_donte_stallwo rthlike_sentence_or_less.html)

Vinny
06-17-2009, 11:21 AM
The defendant wasn't in the crosswalk and I've heard that Florida scales the % of liability when it comes to these types of cases (there is a legal term but it escapes me right now). Since the defendant wasn't in the crosswalk I heard it wasn't in the families best interest to pursue it any other way than this.

CloakNNNdagger
06-17-2009, 11:45 AM
The defendant wasn't in the crosswalk and I've heard that Florida scales the % of liability when it comes to these types of cases (there is a legal term but it escapes me right now). Since the defendant wasn't in the crosswalk I heard it wasn't in the families best interest to pursue it any other way than this.

Florida DUI Manslaughter is not a Strict Liability Statute

HoustonFrog
06-17-2009, 11:52 AM
Florida DUI Manslaughter is not a Strict Liability Statute

It is Comparative Negligence. You weigh the circumstances of both parties. Basically the guy was also at fault by crossing a busy roadway not at the crosswalk. The family got him to plea and they go their civil suit money.

Blake
06-17-2009, 11:59 AM
I heard on sports center that he will only be serving 24 days.

CloakNNNdagger
06-17-2009, 12:27 PM
I heard on sports center that he will only be serving 24 days.

Evidently, 6 days off for good behaviour.............:mcnugget:

CloakNNNdagger
06-17-2009, 12:28 PM
It is Comparative Negligence. You weigh the circumstances of both parties. Basically the guy was also at fault by crossing a busy roadway not at the crosswalk. The family got him to plea and they go their civil suit money.

:tiphat:

nunusguy
06-18-2009, 04:13 PM
The league just suspended him indefinitely. Good deal !

CloakNNNdagger
06-20-2009, 07:56 AM
His "indefinite" suspension would also probably be related to his previous inclusion in the NFL Substance Abuse Program. Now Jim Brown reveals that the accident seemed to involve more than alcohol.

Jim Brown Suggests That Marijuana Was Involved In Stallworth Accident (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/rumors/post/Jim-Brown-Marijuana-was-involved-in-Stallworth?urn=nfl,171561)


Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown, who remains a senior member of Cleveland Browns management, suggested on Friday that Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth was smoking marijuana on the evening/morning of the accident that claimed the life of 59-year-old Mario Reyes.

Brown made his remarks during an appearance on 790 The Ticket’s The Dan LeBatard Show.

“This situation is a tragedy all around, but what was involved was alcohol and marijuana,” Brown said. “On one hand, DUI is a very serious thing in America. Marijuana of course is against all the rules.”

Brown explained that he has some “inside information that says that that was also a part of what was detected,” presumably in the blood test imposed on Stallworth. Brown said he’s not “100 percent sure” that this is true, but Brown said he spoke with a ” very reliable source” who shared this information.

Furthermore, FOX NEWS has just reported that Stallworth's settlement with the family was for $5 million. If I remember correctly, this would "coincidently" be the same sum Stallworth qualified for in bonus money the day before he killed Reyes. I may be legally challenged, but I would dare say, even if the case was weakened by the fact that the victim did not use the crosswalk, had Stallworth not had $5 million, he would not have avoided a trial, and very likely would have enjoyed years of pounding out license plates under the supervision of "Bubba."

Texans_Chick
06-20-2009, 03:33 PM
My lawyer and NFL thoughts on the case are here:

Stallworth Resolves Criminal and Civil Claims (What Does This Mean?) (http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2009/06/16/stallworth-resolves-criminal-and-civil-claims-what-does-this-me/)

Also check out further discussion in the first page of comments.

If you want to hear a more in depth discussion of the Vick v. Stallworth thing among other random stuff, I talk about it in this podcast (http://backporch.fanhouse.com/2009/06/19/hauscast-29-stephanie-stradley-talks-t-o-twitter-stallworth/)

CloakNNNdagger
06-20-2009, 06:09 PM
My lawyer and NFL thoughts on the case are here:

Stallworth Resolves Criminal and Civil Claims (What Does This Mean?) (http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2009/06/16/stallworth-resolves-criminal-and-civil-claims-what-does-this-me/)

Also check out further discussion in the first page of comments.

If you want to hear a more in depth discussion of the Vick v. Stallworth thing among other random stuff, I talk about it in this podcast (http://backporch.fanhouse.com/2009/06/19/hauscast-29-stephanie-stradley-talks-t-o-twitter-stallworth/)

Good review, Steph. I still doubt that he makes it thru his probation period. That being said, in the few states that don't have reciprocal agreements with other states (I believe there are only a few), can he somehow claim residence in one of them and continue to drive with his new license in other states............or in the state that originally revoked his license?

gary
06-20-2009, 09:45 PM
Now Roger Goodell I have respect for he seems to hold his players to higher standards unlike MLB or the NBA when it comes to breaking NFL rules or the law based on what I've heard and read. MLB has a big steriod problem right now and Bud is not as tough on his players as he should be IMO and because of this MLB fans have changed the way they look at the game of baseball. For the most part Roger has tried to uphold a positive outlook upon the NFL MLB on the other hand not so much IMO. I know the man shouldn't have crossed such a busy street like he did and part of the blame is on him but Donte was high and durnk at the time and when you have a good job making as much money as Donte does you should use better judgement and choose wisely he is a grown man afterall. Right? If there is one thing I hate it is people making bad mistakes that do not have to be made. Overall I am happy with what the NFL gave him and it is better than what the court of law gave him JMO.

Texans_Chick
06-22-2009, 12:33 PM
Now Roger Goodell I have respect for he seems to hold his players to higher standards unlike MLB or the NBA when it comes to breaking NFL rules or the law based on what I've heard and read. MLB has a big steriod problem right now and Bud is not as tough on his players as he should be IMO and because of this MLB fans have changed the way they look at the game of baseball. For the most part Roger has tried to uphold a positive outlook upon the NFL MLB on the other hand not so much IMO. I know the man shouldn't have crossed such a busy street like he did and part of the blame is on him but Donte was high and durnk at the time and when you have a good job making as much money as Donte does you should use better judgement and choose wisely he is a grown man afterall. Right? If there is one thing I hate it is people making bad mistakes that do not have to be made. Overall I am happy with what the NFL gave him and it is better than what the court of law gave him JMO.

Yeah, King Roger should basically do what the mob majority wants him to do. That due process thing is way overrated.

We've gotten to this point because the owners put product on the field over disciplining their own players. But making decisions on whatever the mob feels that day puts all players in a precarious position. Whatever special interest group yells the loudest will keep players off the field, and teams have to suck up whatever punishment Roger feels that day. It puts teams in bad positions.

Texans_Chick
06-22-2009, 12:35 PM
Good review, Steph. I still doubt that he makes it thru his probation period. That being said, in the few states that don't have reciprocal agreements with other states (I believe there are only a few), can he somehow claim residence in one of them and continue to drive with his new license in other states............or in the state that originally revoked his license?

That's an almost impossible probation period to get through, and with public opinion being as negative as it is, the probation folks and a judge will give him no benefit of the doubt with even small violations.

I don't know the answer to the license question.

gary
06-22-2009, 01:02 PM
Yeah, King Roger should basically do what the mob majority wants him to do. That due process thing is way overrated.

We've gotten to this point because the owners put product on the field over disciplining their own players. But making decisions on whatever the mob feels that day puts all players in a precarious position. Whatever special interest group yells the loudest will keep players off the field, and teams have to suck up whatever punishment Roger feels that day. It puts teams in bad positions.A season or two out of the league won't hurt Donte. A year in jail wouldn't have been so bad either thirty day is just too soft IMO.

CloakNNNdagger
06-22-2009, 04:59 PM
That's an almost impossible probation period to get through, and with public opinion being as negative as it is, the probation folks and a judge will give him no benefit of the doubt with even small violations.

I don't know the answer to the license question.

I indeed accidently NEG REPPED you...................Can one of the mods please tell me how to undo my dasterdly deed! PLEASE!!!!!!!:dangit::tomato::sos::sos:

gary
06-22-2009, 05:04 PM
Is he going to make it through the two years house arrest without getting in any throuble? That is the question.

Texans_Chick
06-22-2009, 05:49 PM
A season or two out of the league won't hurt Donte. A year in jail wouldn't have been so bad either thirty day is just too soft IMO.

A few contrarian thoughts:

We don't know if the ban is a season or two. It's until King Goodell feels like it.

A player's career is only finite in length.

If the victim's family was okay with the sentence (which they were), why should we get all up in arms about it?

It's hypocritical as hades. The NFL sells tons of (overpriced) alcohol sales at the stadium and send thousands of drivers into the roads. They don't intend for those people to run into and kill anyone but it happens anyway. So the NFL is the tough guy for making an example of Stallworth, but last year I get my car smashed by a drunk guy after leaving Reliant Stadium.

People think probation is easy, but it isn't. So "just 30 days in jail" sorta talk is a little misguided. It is also misguided because we as outsiders to the trial do not know all the evidence. It is quite likely with good attorneying that Stallworth might have been found not guilty of DUI Manslaughter because of the difficulty of showing causation for the death if the victim crossed a busy street not at a crosswalk.

infantrycak
06-22-2009, 06:08 PM
I indeed accidently NEG REPPED you...................Can one of the mods please tell me how to undo my dasterdly deed! PLEASE!!!!!!!:dangit::tomato::sos::sos:

PM Vinny or Khari. That's an almighty admin power.

Actually, I can unofficially counter-balance with a pos rep, so that will be done.

gary
06-22-2009, 06:15 PM
A few contrarian thoughts:

We don't know if the ban is a season or two. It's until King Goodell feels like it.

A player's career is only finite in length.

If the victim's family was okay with the sentence (which they were), why should we get all up in arms about it?

It's hypocritical as hades. The NFL sells tons of (overpriced) alcohol sales at the stadium and send thousands of drivers into the roads. They don't intend for those people to run into and kill anyone but it happens anyway. So the NFL is the tough guy for making an example of Stallworth, but last year I get my car smashed by a drunk guy after leaving Reliant Stadium.

People think probation is easy, but it isn't. So "just 30 days in jail" sorta talk is a little misguided. It is also misguided because we as outsiders to the trial do not know all the evidence. It is quite likely with good attorneying that Stallworth might have been found not guilty of DUI Manslaughter because of the difficulty of showing causation for the death if the victim crossed a busy street not at a crosswalk.You are right we do not know how long the band is just an exsample by me. I was just hoping for a little more jail time. Vick got more time for dog fighting. Never said probation is easy. That is why I asked if he is going to make it that long. We don't know what the judge saw and what he did not. I agree that if the man had used the crosswalk it would have been a totaly different outcome.

Texan4Ever
06-22-2009, 09:30 PM
Stallworth got away with murder by being sentenced to 30 days in jail, plus 1,000 hours of community service, 2 years of house arrest, and 8 years probation. This is nothing but a lsp on the wirst, if me or any of you guys on TTalk were to have done what he did we would be sitting in jail right now.

I hope Roger Goodell knows better, he should ban Stallworth from the NFL for life for what he's done and may GOD excat revenge and punish him for his deeds.

Makes me sick to my stomach to see criminals get away with stuff so easily, our judicial system as well as our criminal laws should be changed...NOW!

gary
06-23-2009, 12:33 PM
Stallworth got away with murder by being sentenced to 30 days in jail, plus 1,000 hours of community service, 2 years of house arrest, and 8 years probation. This is nothing but a lsp on the wirst, if me or any of you guys on TTalk were to have done what he did we would be sitting in jail right now.

I hope Roger Goodell knows better, he should ban Stallworth from the NFL for life for what he's done and may GOD excat revenge and punish him for his deeds.

Makes me sick to my stomach to see criminals get away with stuff so easily, our judicial system as well as our criminal laws should be changed...NOW!
If it was you or me or the guy Joe accross the street they would have our heads on a Silver platter. I know I wouldn't be too thrilled about it.

StarStruck
06-23-2009, 01:16 PM
If it was you or me or the guy Joe accross the street they would have our heads on a Silver platter. I know I wouldn't be too thrilled about it.

I'm curious. Do you think Stallworth's punishment would have been the same if the pedestrian would have used the crosswalk and attempted to cross the causeway with the right-of-way?

gary
06-23-2009, 01:29 PM
I'm curious. Do you think Stallworth's punishment would have been the same if the pedestrian would have used the crosswalk and attempted to cross the causeway with the right-of-way?
No but you also have to look at how big of a role did being high and drunk played. I wonder what would have happend to the average Joe and compare the two. You have to admit sports stars do under go different treatment.

Texans_Chick
06-23-2009, 06:11 PM
Stallworth got away with murder by being sentenced to 30 days in jail, plus 1,000 hours of community service, 2 years of house arrest, and 8 years probation. This is nothing but a lsp on the wirst, if me or any of you guys on TTalk were to have done what he did we would be sitting in jail right now.

I hope Roger Goodell knows better, he should ban Stallworth from the NFL for life for what he's done and may GOD excat revenge and punish him for his deeds.

Makes me sick to my stomach to see criminals get away with stuff so easily, our judicial system as well as our criminal laws should be changed...NOW!

Actually, celeb status works for and against athletes. It is quite possible that they wouldn't have charged a regular person with DUI Manslaughter and just regular DUI. Apparently, there was a video that may have raised reasonable doubt.

Celeb status works for a person because that usually means they have financial resources and can hire good lawyers.

Celeb status works against a person because prosecutors like to make examples of people and tend to grandstand if they have the facts to do so. There is no quietly resolving a case like what happens with most cases.

And one thing I've learned over time is that everyone wants to throw the book at criminals until that time when they, a friend or family member gets sideways with the law. Most people charged with crimes thought it would never ever happen to them.

gary
06-23-2009, 09:21 PM
Actually, celeb status works for and against athletes. It is quite possible that they wouldn't have charged a regular person with DUI Manslaughter and just regular DUI. Apparently, there was a video that may have raised reasonable doubt.

Celeb status works for a person because that usually means they have financial resources and can hire good lawyers.

Celeb status works against a person because prosecutors like to make examples of people and tend to grandstand if they have the facts to do so. There is no quietly resolving a case like what happens with most cases.

And one thing I've learned over time is that everyone wants to throw the book at criminals until that time when they, a friend or family member gets sideways with the law. Most people charged with crimes thought it would never ever happen to them.
Is there a link to that video TC for the public to see or some link saying the video is out there?

Texan4Ever
06-23-2009, 09:28 PM
Regardless of who was at fault (I don't see how the pedestrian was at fault), the sentencing and punishment that Stallworth received makes all those "You Can't Afford DWI/DUI" comemricals look like a joke!

Horry for our stupid criminal justice system!!!! :lion:

StarStruck
06-24-2009, 12:01 AM
Regardless of who was at fault (I don't see how the pedestrian was at fault), the sentencing and punishment that Stallworth received makes all those "You Can't Afford DWI/DUI" comemricals look like a joke!

Horry for our stupid criminal justice system!!!! :lion:

You probably have a point. I've seen too many pedestrians or bike riders cross the street wherever then darn please and dare your to hit them.

gary
06-24-2009, 09:50 AM
The fact is here that you should use good judement while you're driving regardless of who is to blame. If he wasn't speeding and DUI and this still happend then it turely would have been a mistake. Why not hire a driver or bring one with you for one night? He should have driven to where ever he was going and then in a safe place if he just had to get high and smoke then do it. But he shouldn't have been doing anything in the first place as it is against the law period.

Texans_Chick
06-29-2009, 08:55 AM
Is there a link to that video TC for the public to see or some link saying the video is out there?

The video isn't public because snuff films aren't cool.

I recall seeing the discussion of the video over at ProFootballTalk about why the sentence wasn't bad. Don't have a link handy.

It's also important to remember that though the prosecution tends to seek the victim's family's permission before they strike a deal, they don't have to follow the families wishes. The family in this case was okay with the outcome. If the prosecution had a strong case, they could have thrown the book at Stallworth even if the family didn't want it. It's not a case like Kobe Bryant, where after Kobe pays the victim, she refuses to cooperate with prosecutors.

gary
06-30-2009, 02:31 PM
We also do not know if Stallworth made a payoff.

Second Honeymoon
06-30-2009, 07:00 PM
We also do not know if Stallworth made a payoff.

actually we do know for a fact that he made a payoff. he reached a settlement with the 'victim's family before the deal was reached. the fact that the family was satisfied with the agreement led to some leniency.

another thing that led to leniency was that the 'victim' put himself in danger and not Stallworth. The 'victim' broke the law in crossing the street where he did and he failed to yield to automobiles as required by law.

I don't blame Stallworth for this but he is legally responsible because he got behind the wheel after a night of drinking and it hadn't left his system yet. If Stallworth wasn't legally 'drunk' there still would have been an accident. The pedestrian put himself in danger but his family were fortunate that he was hit by someone in a Bentley....oh and massive fail for Stallworth driving a Bentley...nothing says ahole more than driving a Bentley...well nothing besides Affliction and Ed Hardy tshirts anyway...

Hervoyel
06-30-2009, 07:37 PM
Actually, celeb status works for and against athletes. It is quite possible that they wouldn't have charged a regular person with DUI Manslaughter and just regular DUI. Apparently, there was a video that may have raised reasonable doubt.

Celeb status works for a person because that usually means they have financial resources and can hire good lawyers.

Celeb status works against a person because prosecutors like to make examples of people and tend to grandstand if they have the facts to do so. There is no quietly resolving a case like what happens with most cases.

And one thing I've learned over time is that everyone wants to throw the book at criminals until that time when they, a friend or family member gets sideways with the law. Most people charged with crimes thought it would never ever happen to them.


So true and people rarely seem to understand that. Paris Hilton and her DUI come to mind. She spends a day in jail or something trivial like that and everyones first reaction is to point their finger at the situation and claim that she's getting preferential treatment but actually the exact opposite was true. I can't stand the twit anymore than the next guy but average joe gets no jail time for a first time DUI. She got the day for the specific purpose of demonstrating that she wasn't getting preferential treatment. The whole thing kinda backfired on them though.

Grams
06-30-2009, 10:27 PM
Cornwell Acknowledges That Stallworth Had Marijuana In His System

In a statement issued on Tuesday night regarding the evidence relating to the Donte’ Stallworth DUI manslaughter case, attorney David Cornwell acknowledges that evidence soon will surface that marijuana was detected in Stallworth’s system.

The full text of the statement is right here.

Recently, Browns executive Jim Brown said that marijuana was involved in the incident. Though Brown didn’t name his source, he also said that he had spoken to Commissioner Roger Goodell regarding the situation.

http://www.profootballtalk.com/category/rumor-mill/

That might just slow your response to a pedestrian crossing the street.

CloakNNNdagger
07-01-2009, 06:37 AM
So true and people rarely seem to understand that. Paris Hilton and her DUI come to mind. She spends a day in jail or something trivial like that and everyones first reaction is to point their finger at the situation and claim that she's getting preferential treatment but actually the exact opposite was true. I can't stand the twit anymore than the next guy but average joe gets no jail time for a first time DUI. She got the day for the specific purpose of demonstrating that she wasn't getting preferential treatment. The whole thing kinda backfired on them though.


There's much more to the Paris Hilton story and why she ended up in jail.


Paris Hilton's DUI Charges
People of the State of Calif. v. Paris Hilton (http://news.findlaw.com/cnn/docs/ent/cahilton92606cmp.html)

Paris Hilton's original DUI charges alleging that on September 27, 2006 she was driving while under the influence, and while "under the combined influence of an alcoholic beverage and a drug. In January 2007 she subsequently pleaded no contest to reckless driving charges stemming from the incident. A judge sentenced her to 3 years of probation, mandatory attendance at an alcohol education program, and fines of $1,500.

On May 4, 2007, a judge sentenced Hilton to 45 days in jail for violating the terms of her probation. According to prosecutors, she failed to enroll in an alcohol education course by mid-April 2007, and was stopped for two more traffic violations, including driving with a suspended license.

gary
07-01-2009, 10:37 AM
actually we do know for a fact that he made a payoff. he reached a settlement with the 'victim's family before the deal was reached. the fact that the family was satisfied with the agreement led to some leniency.

another thing that led to leniency was that the 'victim' put himself in danger and not Stallworth. The 'victim' broke the law in crossing the street where he did and he failed to yield to automobiles as required by law.

I don't blame Stallworth for this but he is legally responsible because he got behind the wheel after a night of drinking and it hadn't left his system yet. If Stallworth wasn't legally 'drunk' there still would have been an accident. The pedestrian put himself in danger but his family were fortunate that he was hit by someone in a Bentley....oh and massive fail for Stallworth driving a Bentley...nothing says ahole more than driving a Bentley...well nothing besides Affliction and Ed Hardy tshirts anyway...I do wonder why the man crossed the main street like he did. The man is porbably more at fault than Donte for crossing the wrong way which I'll never understand. The family got paid. They are ok with it. I still think maybe Donte should undergo some rehab for his drinking and pot problem.

infantrycak
07-01-2009, 11:03 AM
I still think maybe Donte should undergo some rehab for his drinking and pot problem.

It may not have been reported, but that is almost certainly a condition of his probation.

Texecutioner
07-01-2009, 01:00 PM
It may not have been reported, but that is almost certainly a condition of his probation.

You are correct sir.

Any time you get a DWI or anything of that nature, there are several terms to your probation that make you attend AA, a victim's impact panel class, and other alcohol education classes.

gary
07-01-2009, 05:47 PM
Good.

wags
07-10-2009, 05:46 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4318550

He has already been released from jail. Time flies. Seems like just yesterday he killed that guy.

HOU-TEX
08-13-2009, 09:20 AM
The NFL has suspended Donte Stallworth for the 2009 season,.

Any other outcome would have been surprising. Some want Commissioner Goodell to suspend Stallworth for life after his felony manslaughter guilty plea, but that seems unlikely. Stallworth probably won't ever play for the Browns again, and his age and talent level don't guarantee that he'll get a job next year anyway, assuming he's reinstated.

http://www.rotoworld.com/Content/home_NFL.aspx