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CloakNNNdagger
08-21-2008, 08:22 AM
Gene Upshaw is dead at 63 from pancreatic cancer (http://www.examiner.com/x-514-Oakland-Raiders-Examiner~y2008m8d21-Sad-Day-for-the-Raider-NationLegendary-Raider-Gene-Upshaw-Passes-Away). I have been on both sides of the fences with some of Upshaw's stances over the years. However, there can be no doubt that he is a hallmark in NFL history. Rest in peace.

TigerV1
08-21-2008, 08:24 AM
I am pretty shocked about this. He hadn't disclosed his illness so its very surprising.

gary
08-21-2008, 08:30 AM
RIP Gene.

PapaL
08-21-2008, 09:00 AM
I thought this was bad joke...wow. I'm stunned.

Thank you for your many years of service to the NFL and it's players and fans Mr. Upshaw.

Texan_Bill
08-21-2008, 09:03 AM
I'm with PapaL. I thought this was leading into a bad joke.

Anyway, despite differences in the way he ran the PA, his service to the league for such a long time should be commended.

Thanks for your service and RIP.

HoustonFrog
08-21-2008, 09:11 AM
I'm with PapaL. I thought this was leading into a bad joke.

Anyway, despite differences in the way he ran the PA, his service to the league for such a long time should be commended.

Thanks for your service and RIP.

I agree with you. While I didn't like his stances as the Union chief I respect his service and his days as a player. This is really sad as I didn't know he was sick.

Seņor Stan
08-21-2008, 09:17 AM
I agree with you. While I didn't like his stances as the Union chief I respect his service and his days as a player. This is really sad as I didn't know he was sick.


Double Agreed.

Despite his tenure in the NFLPA, I liked Upshaw.

Texas A&I grad and a native Texans (Robstown).

RIP Gene.

Wolf
08-21-2008, 09:17 AM
oh wow R.I.P. Gene

hobie
08-21-2008, 09:18 AM
RIP.... Just goes to show that some people work and fight right to the end !!

gtexan02
08-21-2008, 09:22 AM
Wow this is a shock...

nunusguy
08-21-2008, 09:35 AM
Died from pancreatic cancer. That's some nasty stuff.
Before he was union chief, he was a tremendous NFL Olineman with the Raiders.
RIP GU.

HOU-TEX
08-21-2008, 09:59 AM
Hopefully he's remembered for his accomplishments as a player and not his antics as NFLPA Chief.

R.I.P.

I don't want to sound like an ass, but I'm curious as to how they will go about bringing in a new Chief. Does anyone know? Do the players vote? Is there someone in waiting?

Specnatz
08-21-2008, 10:10 AM
WOW is all I got. Like most of you I did not know he was sick and thought this was leading somewhere into a joke.

texasguy346
08-21-2008, 10:43 AM
I don't want to sound like an ass, but I'm curious as to how they will go about bringing in a new Chief. Does anyone know? Do the players vote? Is there someone in waiting?

I remember some rumbling a few months back about the NFLPA trying to replace Upshaw, but most every player in the NFLPA denied it. At the time it was said they were looking to have Troy Vincent take over Upshaw's duties. It makes sense now in that I'd imagine they were likely looking for someone to replace Upshaw once they found out about his pancreatic cancer. They might have been looking to replace him simply so he could concentrate on his recovery. Either way it's very sad news to hear this morning.

WWJD
08-21-2008, 10:57 AM
Wow. Surprising to hear this. Interesting that he chose not to publicize that he was ill and dying. Most famous people are "outed" and on death watch for months by the public. Really sad.

Hooston Texan
08-21-2008, 10:59 AM
Hopefully he's remembered for his accomplishments as a player and not his antics as NFLPA Chief.

R.I.P.

I don't want to sound like an ass, but I'm curious as to how they will go about bringing in a new Chief. Does anyone know? Do the players vote? Is there someone in waiting?

What "antics" are you referring to?

Upshaw's union rose from the ashes of the 1987 strike to become the richest union that ever existed. His players will make over $3.5 billion this year, far more than their counterparts in any other sport. He was about two decades ahead of baseball in realizing that steroid testing was actually in his rank-and-file's best interest (even though he opposes blood testing now). Part of the reason the league's TV money is so rich is the labor peace he presided over.

The criticism of Upshaw seems to come from these fronts:

1. That he wasn't tough enough (in general) with the NFL. He tried striking in 1987 and it broke his union in half. He obviously decided that splashy "strike is looming" headlines were less effective than being a true partner with the owners. The players owe their bank accounts to that decision. The media loves to cover labor disputes, but Upshaw would not give them one after 1987.

2. No guaranteed contracts. With injuries a fact of life, a system where all contracts were guaranteed would be, at worst, completely unworkable and, at best, fundamentally change (and probably not for the better) the economics of the game.

3. Relations with retired players. The sad fact is that retired players who are screaming the loudest played when salaries were--even in those times--low. Most every other pension system keys benefits to the recipients' salaries when they were active. So they've missed out on the explosion in salaries. Plus, many of the ones whom Mike Ditka has cited cashed in their pensions very early--some in the 40s. When you do that, you get very little. Just a hard fact. Yes, Upshaw could have taken some money from the active players and given it to the retired ones, but he answers to those current players. Good luck with that.

I frankly think that Upshaw was one of the most effective leaders of a sports union in my lifetime. But I hope, hope, hope, hope his death does not adversely affect the current CBA negotiations. Both sides (and we fans) have way too much to lose if those negotiations to fail.

Overalls
08-21-2008, 11:00 AM
I was taken back by this also. Just like with everyone you meet in life you won't agree with everything they do but overall he lead the Player Union though the times where the players made the most. Whether good or bad. I hope the person that takes over for him doesn't decide to play hard ball with the posibility of a non capped year coming up and the lock out that could follow. He lead the union through some tough times and was a heck of a player. May he rest in peace.

feebleminded
08-21-2008, 11:06 AM
This statement from the NFLPA says that he just found out this Sunday. Wow, just wow.

http://www.nflplayers.com/user/content.aspx?fmid=178&lmid=443&pid=1822

Vinny
08-21-2008, 11:15 AM
Great, great, dominant lineman who had a Super Bowl ring on a team in 3 decades and was on the 75th anniversary all-NFL team. Sadly those big guys don't tend to live long lives. RIP

Brando
08-21-2008, 11:16 AM
I'm shocked....He definitely made his mark on the NFL. RIP Gene.

WWJD
08-21-2008, 11:22 AM
This statement from the NFLPA says that he just found out this Sunday. Wow, just wow.

http://www.nflplayers.com/user/content.aspx?fmid=178&lmid=443&pid=1822

Well that would certainly explain why his illness wasn't publicized.

toronto
08-21-2008, 11:35 AM
What "antics" are you referring to?

Upshaw's union rose from the ashes of the 1987 strike to become the richest union that ever existed. His players will make over $3.5 billion this year, far more than their counterparts in any other sport. He was about two decades ahead of baseball in realizing that steroid testing was actually in his rank-and-file's best interest (even though he opposes blood testing now). Part of the reason the league's TV money is so rich is the labor peace he presided over.

The criticism of Upshaw seems to come from these fronts:

1. That he wasn't tough enough (in general) with the NFL. He tried striking in 1987 and it broke his union in half. He obviously decided that splashy "strike is looming" headlines were less effective than being a true partner with the owners. The players owe their bank accounts to that decision. The media loves to cover labor disputes, but Upshaw would not give them one after 1987.

2. No guaranteed contracts. With injuries a fact of life, a system where all contracts were guaranteed would be, at worst, completely unworkable and, at best, fundamentally change (and probably not for the better) the economics of the game.

3. Relations with retired players. The sad fact is that retired players who are screaming the loudest played when salaries were--even in those times--low. Most every other pension system keys benefits to the recipients' salaries when they were active. So they've missed out on the explosion in salaries. Plus, many of the ones whom Mike Ditka has cited cashed in their pensions very early--some in the 40s. When you do that, you get very little. Just a hard fact. Yes, Upshaw could have taken some money from the active players and given it to the retired ones, but he answers to those current players. Good luck with that.

I frankly think that Upshaw was one of the most effective leaders of a sports union in my lifetime. But I hope, hope, hope, hope his death does not adversely affect the current CBA negotiations. Both sides (and we fans) have way too much to lose if those negotiations to fail.


This is one of the stories that got a lot of publicity....

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2893714

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2900936

RIP Gene, as a human being...But I suspect there will always been three sides to these stories, and we'll never know the real truth.
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2900936

Specnatz
08-21-2008, 11:42 AM
3. Relations with retired players. The sad fact is that retired players who are screaming the loudest played when salaries were--even in those times--low. Most every other pension system keys benefits to the recipients' salaries when they were active. So they've missed out on the explosion in salaries. Plus, many of the ones whom Mike Ditka has cited cashed in their pensions very early--some in the 40s. When you do that, you get very little. Just a hard fact. Yes, Upshaw could have taken some money from the active players and given it to the retired ones, but he answers to those current players. Good luck with that.


Yes because most of those guys had large amounts of medical bills and really nothing in the way of a skill set to fall back on. So to feed themselves and their family and pay all those medical bills for years of banging around they cashed in their pensions. Damn what were they thinking.

Of course Upshaw was making $3.5 mil as head of the players association. Some of the players today said they would be happy to give money to the guys who paved the way but Upshaw would not even listen. He could have saved himself a lot of bad PR but giving just even a little before the bad PR, so when he gave just a little it was not even really noticed because by then the media was in full on shark attack mode no matter what was done.

texasguy346
08-21-2008, 12:05 PM
This statement from the NFLPA says that he just found out this Sunday. Wow, just wow.

http://www.nflplayers.com/user/content.aspx?fmid=178&lmid=443&pid=1822


Schefter just reported that on NFL network, and I was shocked to hear how little time he had between being diagnosed & his death. Very sad news indeed.

Specnatz
08-21-2008, 12:22 PM
Schefter just reported that on NFL network, and I was shocked to hear how little time he had between being diagnosed & his death. Very sad news indeed.

That is why you are suppose to get checked every year after age of 40.

steelbtexan
08-21-2008, 12:37 PM
He did a great job working in partnership with the owners. They developed the most sucessful sports league ever & only had one work stoppage.

The retired players didn't invest their money properly &are paying the price for those choices. While retired players didn't make the money todays players make they were still in the upper 10 % of wage earners in society @ the time they were playing. While I have sympathy for their plight I understand GU stance that he worked for active players.

He was one of the greatest OL to have ever played. A great leader as a player & with the NFLPA.
A great Texan who left his mark on the NFL & in life.
An exceptional husband & father. The world lost a pioneer today.

RIP Gene you will be missed.

HOU-TEX
08-21-2008, 12:53 PM
That is why you are suppose to get checked every year after age of 40.

Heck, I'm now getting checkups every 6 months........and I'm not even 40 yet! Freakin genetic BS! :aggressive:

Carr Bombed
08-21-2008, 01:08 PM
I was shocked to hear how little time he had between being diagnosed & his death. Very sad news indeed.

I look at it as a blessing in a way.......If I was to get sick like that, that's how I would like to go. Live a happy life then something pops up and I find out I've got terminal cancer one day than die a couple of days later. I watched cancer literally eat my grandfather alive over the course of 2 years......it was very painful, painful for everybody, towards the end I would just pray for the good lord to just take him already.

Anyways, RIP Gene.

Texan_Bill
08-21-2008, 01:09 PM
I look at it as a blessing in a way.......If I was to get sick like that, that's how I would like to go. Live a happy life then something pops up and I find out I've got terminal cancer one day than die a couple of days later. I watched cancer literally eat my grandfather alive over the course of 2 years......it was very painful.

Anyways, RIP Gene.

Great point....

toronto
08-21-2008, 01:49 PM
I look at it as a blessing in a way.......If I was to get sick like that, that's how I would like to go. Live a happy life then something pops up and I find out I've got terminal cancer one day than die a couple of days later. I watched cancer literally eat my grandfather alive over the course of 2 years......it was very painful, painful for everybody, towards the end I would just pray for the good lord to just take him already.

Anyways, RIP Gene.

Ditto after watching my uncle crumble to colorectal cancer in 6 weeks.

The Pencil Neck
08-21-2008, 02:59 PM
I was really shocked by this.

RIP, Gene.

BattleRedRaider
08-21-2008, 04:30 PM
The greatest person to ever come out of Robstown, Texas.

R.I.P.

Showtime100
08-21-2008, 05:36 PM
The man has been in my football conscience all of my life. RIP Gene. You and Larry Little made names for yourselves in the faceless trenches of the '70's NFL offensive lines.

My thoughts go to his family.

cc_me
08-21-2008, 11:59 PM
Heck, I'm now getting checkups every 6 months........and I'm not even 40 yet! Freakin genetic BS! :aggressive:

That is why you are suppose to get checked every year after age of 40.
He death was a shock to the Nation also. RIP Gene.

But, what he had was pancreatic cancer, not prostate cancer. I do not think that one gets their pancreas checked. That type of cancer is one of the fastest killers. Every person that I ever heard that had pancreatic cancer lasted less than a month. What a shame, but if I had to get it, that's the one I'd want to get.

WWJD
08-22-2008, 10:13 AM
He death was a shock to the Nation also. RIP Gene.

But, what he had was pancreatic cancer, not prostate cancer. I do not think that one gets their pancreas checked. That type of cancer is one of the fastest killers. Every person that I ever heard that had pancreatic cancer lasted less than a month. What a shame, but if I had to get it, that's the one I'd want to get.

Patrick Swayze has pancreatic cancer and is doing very well! Working on a new series in Chicago. He's quoted as saying he's a miracle and I would agree. The cancer may get him eventually..hope not...but right now he's doing very well.

cuppacoffee
08-22-2008, 12:00 PM
The greatest person to ever come out of Robstown, Texas.

R.I.P.


Well..probably the most famous...:thinking:

He was a very successful football player and later on made millions as NFL players union president..:money:

Many a son and daughter in Robstown probably think their parents were the greatest person to come out of Robstown.

Sad time for his family and friends, but I don't necessarily attach greatness as a person to sports heros'.

There are sports figures who have done great things selflessly helping others, I don't recall G.U as being one of them.

Just using BRRs' post to express my own opinion.

Not trying to be a cold hearted bastid, just saying....

RIP Gene Upshaw.

:coffee:

whiskeyrbl
08-22-2008, 12:30 PM
Rip

Sal Rosenberg
08-22-2008, 12:47 PM
Rip

Specnatz
08-22-2008, 01:28 PM
He death was a shock to the Nation also. RIP Gene.

But, what he had was pancreatic cancer, not prostate cancer. I do not think that one gets their pancreas checked. That type of cancer is one of the fastest killers. Every person that I ever heard that had pancreatic cancer lasted less than a month. What a shame, but if I had to get it, that's the one I'd want to get.

I was referring to anything relating to cancer.

CloakNNNdagger
08-22-2008, 05:44 PM
He death was a shock to the Nation also. RIP Gene.

But, what he had was pancreatic cancer, not prostate cancer. I do not think that one gets their pancreas checked. That type of cancer is one of the fastest killers. Every person that I ever heard that had pancreatic cancer lasted less than a month. What a shame, but if I had to get it, that's the one I'd want to get.

Median survival from diagnosis to death is approximately 3 to 6 months. The chances that anyone with pancreatic cancer is alive at 5 years is less than 5% (You will virtually never see a complete cure). There is a good reason for all this. There is no true screen for the cancer and by the time the patient shows any symptoms, the cancer is usually metastatic. The typical presentation is only dramatic unexplained weight loss. In some presentations, there is a dull ache in the upper abdomen that is misinterpretted as heartburn because it is worsened by eating. Fortunately, this cancer is a relatively rare cancer. However, indeed, the end invariably is accompanied by excrutiating pain controlled only partially by heavy sedation with powerful narcotics. You have to feel for anyone who has developed cancer, but especially so for one as viscous as this one.

BattleRedRaider
08-22-2008, 05:49 PM
Well..probably the most famous...:thinking:

He was a very successful football player and later on made millions as NFL players union president..:money:

Many a son and daughter in Robstown probably think their parents were the greatest person to come out of Robstown.

Sad time for his family and friends, but I don't necessarily attach greatness as a person to sports heros'.

There are sports figures who have done great things selflessly helping others, I don't recall G.U as being one of them.

Just using BRRs' post to express my own opinion.

Not trying to be a cold hearted bastid, just saying....

RIP Gene Upshaw.

:coffee:

I said "most famous" in another forum...I know Solomon Ortiz is a Congressman, and he's probably helped the most people in his lifetime.

I only say "greatest" in my opinion, since I played football and thought of him as an idol of sorts. Ortiz is great too, I just never wanted to grow up to be a Congressman.

cuppacoffee
08-24-2008, 12:07 AM
I said "most famous" in another forum...I know Solomon Ortiz is a Congressman, and he's probably helped the most people in his lifetime.

I only say "greatest" in my opinion, since I played football and thought of him as an idol of sorts. Ortiz is great too, I just never wanted to grow up to be a Congressman.



I was sure of your intent...I just wanted to add my :twocents: and my unsolicited opinion.

A congressman?

We just don't realize in our formative years just how much..:money:.there is in politics. :D

OK salary..boosted incredibly by perks'...:winky:

Great retirement pay...and you don't even have to show up for work.

Football...you get your brains bashed regularly..coaches call you bad names, and you must perform ( most players ) to keep your job.

But we alpha males rather play football...go figure.:wacko:


:coffee:

Brando
09-01-2008, 08:35 PM
NFL players to wear uniform patch this season in honor of Upshaw



NEW YORK -- NFL players will wear a uniform patch this season to honor NFL Players' Association leader Gene Upshaw, who died Aug. 20.

The league announced Monday that the patch will have the initials GU and the number 63, which he wore while playing for the Oakland Raiders.

Upshaw died of pancreatic cancer just three days after he was diagnosed.

The patch will be worn on the left chest of jerseys and is scheduled to make its debut Thursday, when the New York Giants and Washington Redskins open the season. Upshaw's wife, Terri, and his three sons will participate in the coin toss.

LINK (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=3563858&campaign=rss&source=ESPNHeadlines)